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194605 [2016/04/26 05:42]
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194605 [2016/04/27 00:30] (current)
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 By J.C.H. By J.C.H.
  
-Windowless walls like eyeless faces, white skeletons in the encroaching green, starkly rising chimney stacks that have not smolsed ​for sixty years, and English trees now grown tall and wild with passing of the years - that is Joadja, ghost mining town of the Southern Tablelands, which at one time housed five hundred families.+Windowless walls like eyeless faces, white skeletons in the encroaching green, starkly rising chimney stacks that have not smoked ​for sixty years, and English trees now grown tall and wild with passing of the years - that is Joadja, ghost mining town of the Southern Tablelands, which at one time housed five hundred families.
  
 The mines that had produced the richest shale ever discovered are in the hillside to the North. With difficulty owing to the overgrown nature of the tracks can be traced the path of the coal and shale to four rows of rusted iron retorts where the crude oil was extracted. Owing to the massive nature of this section decay has proceeded here at a slower rate, but tall saplings grow through crevices in the brickwork. The mines that had produced the richest shale ever discovered are in the hillside to the North. With difficulty owing to the overgrown nature of the tracks can be traced the path of the coal and shale to four rows of rusted iron retorts where the crude oil was extracted. Owing to the massive nature of this section decay has proceeded here at a slower rate, but tall saplings grow through crevices in the brickwork.
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 Standing in the ruins of the refinery now overgrown with blackberry vines a feeling of depression is experienced. Seeing on every hand tumbled ruins and the encroaches of the bush one is troubled with thoughts of the transience of life and the futility of human endeavour. In winter the bare limbs of the strange trees add to the general effect of desolation. Standing in the ruins of the refinery now overgrown with blackberry vines a feeling of depression is experienced. Seeing on every hand tumbled ruins and the encroaches of the bush one is troubled with thoughts of the transience of life and the futility of human endeavour. In winter the bare limbs of the strange trees add to the general effect of desolation.
  
-Soundness of construction is indicated in a number of buildings now stripped of floors and roof-iron. The sturdyschoolhouse ​was for many years untouched, complete with blackboards and school books showing the childish writing of people now in their seventies. The director'​s house, in attractive red brick, has now disappeared behind it's grove of poplar trees. The Manager'​s house is maintained as a farm-house by the present occupier, a Mr. Trotter. The old groves of fruit and nut trees have been destroyed by fire and now grazing seems to be the only activity in the valley. The community hall has lost its fine dance floor to a hall in Mittagong. This hall, in its day, with the hotel was the scene of many revels when money was plentiful, and cares were few.+Soundness of construction is indicated in a number of buildings now stripped of floors and roof-iron. The sturdy schoolhouse ​was for many years untouched, complete with blackboards and school books showing the childish writing of people now in their seventies. The director'​s house, in attractive red brick, has now disappeared behind it's grove of poplar trees. The Manager'​s house is maintained as a farm-house by the present occupier, a Mr. Trotter. The old groves of fruit and nut trees have been destroyed by fire and now grazing seems to be the only activity in the valley. The community hall has lost its fine dance floor to a hall in Mittagong. This hall, in its day, with the hotel was the scene of many revels when money was plentiful, and cares were few.
  
 The grassy streets are lined with avenues of well-grown imported trees, oaks, pines and sycamores. The houses are in various stages of disrepair, those in what was known as "​Stringybark Row" surviving the bushfire only as a chimney or hearthstone. The grassy streets are lined with avenues of well-grown imported trees, oaks, pines and sycamores. The houses are in various stages of disrepair, those in what was known as "​Stringybark Row" surviving the bushfire only as a chimney or hearthstone.
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 Behind the palm in whose shade he sat rose a large factory. Over my head rumbled three floors of machinery. But between those busy factories was a man who reclined at peace among growing things, and read his paper. Read, probably, of the shells whining and bursting as Communist and fellow Chinese spilt blood, of riots and bloodshed among the teeming millions of India; of horrors near and far, that show what man can do to follow-man. Behind the palm in whose shade he sat rose a large factory. Over my head rumbled three floors of machinery. But between those busy factories was a man who reclined at peace among growing things, and read his paper. Read, probably, of the shells whining and bursting as Communist and fellow Chinese spilt blood, of riots and bloodshed among the teeming millions of India; of horrors near and far, that show what man can do to follow-man.
  
-The breeze caught his paper, and he had to clutch it for a momont. Then he turned a page, and relaxed again among the grasses, at peace in the shade of a waving palm.+The breeze caught his paper, and he had to clutch it for a moment. Then he turned a page, and relaxed again among the grasses, at peace in the shade of a waving palm.
  
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 The following has been extracted from the New Zealand journal, "​Alpinesport"​. Though the writer obviously has in mind climbing under rather different conditions from those generally met by bushwalkers here it makes interesting reading. Perhaps an adaptation of these precepts by us would make easier the filling of the "​leader"​ column of the Walks Programme: The following has been extracted from the New Zealand journal, "​Alpinesport"​. Though the writer obviously has in mind climbing under rather different conditions from those generally met by bushwalkers here it makes interesting reading. Perhaps an adaptation of these precepts by us would make easier the filling of the "​leader"​ column of the Walks Programme:
  
-"There are certain walking manners, the observance of which will do much to promote the harmony of the party and save the leader'​s temper. If your leader sets the pace keep to it. If it is too slow for you, remember the slowest man for whom it is just right: that i8 why the leader does it. If your leader makes a slight error in the choice of route, do not pass him on a shorter line; even he is not infallible, ​andyour ​action implies a criticism of his judgment which is ill-deserved. Concede the mistake and take the longer way. If you are zig-zagging up an open hillside and each member of the party is choosing his own line, it is again good manners to see that your line, however widely spaced from the leader'​s,​ does not overtake the level at which he is climbing. Further, if you are converging ultimately on a common object such as the commencement of a track, or a large shady rock, it is his privilege to arrive there first so that he can decide the future movements of the party merely by going on or stopping. Always give your leader the opportunity of making a decision by action rather than by words. His position then becomes the less obvious. After negotiating a slightly steeper or more difficult piece of ground, check your pace when you come to easier terrain. It is annoying for the man behind you on the difficult section to see you forge ahead when he, perforce, has to slow down. When returning from a climb, ​successfu ​or otherwise, do not race ahead. Others are not as fresh as you and if someone should twist an ankle or slip on easy ground your help is useless a mile further down the track. For what shall it profit man if he gain the summit end lose his own party?"​+"There are certain walking manners, the observance of which will do much to promote the harmony of the party and save the leader'​s temper. If your leader sets the pace keep to it. If it is too slow for you, remember the slowest man for whom it is just right: that i8 why the leader does it. If your leader makes a slight error in the choice of route, do not pass him on a shorter line; even he is not infallible, ​and your action implies a criticism of his judgment which is ill-deserved. Concede the mistake and take the longer way. If you are zig-zagging up an open hillside and each member of the party is choosing his own line, it is again good manners to see that your line, however widely spaced from the leader'​s,​ does not overtake the level at which he is climbing. Further, if you are converging ultimately on a common object such as the commencement of a track, or a large shady rock, it is his privilege to arrive there first so that he can decide the future movements of the party merely by going on or stopping. Always give your leader the opportunity of making a decision by action rather than by words. His position then becomes the less obvious. After negotiating a slightly steeper or more difficult piece of ground, check your pace when you come to easier terrain. It is annoying for the man behind you on the difficult section to see you forge ahead when he, perforce, has to slow down. When returning from a climb, ​successful ​or otherwise, do not race ahead. Others are not as fresh as you and if someone should twist an ankle or slip on easy ground your help is useless a mile further down the track. For what shall it profit man if he gain the summit end lose his own party?"​
  
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 =====June Holiday Weekend - Walks.===== =====June Holiday Weekend - Walks.=====
  
-Although there'​s been a change in the date of the King's Birthday, Fraser Ratcliff'​s 3-day jaunt will still take place on June 7-10th. However, itinerary will be: Wentworth Falls - Kedumba Pass - Korrowall Buttress - Cedar Ck - Cox R. - Konangaroo-  Mt.Guouegang ​- Mt.Jenolan - Cox R. - 6 foot Track - Medlow Bath (about 45 miles).+Although there'​s been a change in the date of the King's Birthday, Fraser Ratcliff'​s 3-day jaunt will still take place on June 7-10th. However, itinerary will be: Wentworth Falls - Kedumba Pass - Korrowall Buttress - Cedar Ck - Cox R. - Konangaro o-  Mt.Guouogang ​- Mt.Jenolan - Cox R. - 6 foot Track - Medlow Bath (about 45 miles).
  
 Please note Fraser'​s 'phone No. F0444 Xtm 509 (not 503 as on Walks Programme). Tickets will be required to Medlow Bath and members are reminded to notify the leader of their intentions of going. Please note Fraser'​s 'phone No. F0444 Xtm 509 (not 503 as on Walks Programme). Tickets will be required to Medlow Bath and members are reminded to notify the leader of their intentions of going.
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 J.C.H. J.C.H.
  
-A few Sundays ago, skippered by Rene Brown, 85 eager kiddies spilled themselves from the bus at the gates of National Park, Fuller'​s Bridge, Chatswood, and with joyous whoops raced along devious paths to the chosen ​glearing ​where the annual Xmas Treat (postponed on account of strikes) was to be held.+A few Sundays ago, skippered by Rene Brown, 85 eager kiddies spilled themselves from the bus at the gates of National Park, Fuller'​s Bridge, Chatswood, and with joyous whoops raced along devious paths to the chosen ​clearing ​where the annual Xmas Treat (postponed on account of strikes) was to be held.
  
 Despite the coolness of the day the hardier soon donned their costumes and dived and swam in the river: others gathered around a skipping rope or took part in a game of rounders, while a few of the hungrier souls looked on at the busy helpers madly buttering bread and cutting salads (both vegetable and fruit), which were soon to disappear down the yawning throats of our young guests. Despite the coolness of the day the hardier soon donned their costumes and dived and swam in the river: others gathered around a skipping rope or took part in a game of rounders, while a few of the hungrier souls looked on at the busy helpers madly buttering bread and cutting salads (both vegetable and fruit), which were soon to disappear down the yawning throats of our young guests.
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 Shortly (all too shortly for the small band of helpers Rene had) lunch time came and it didn't take long for the hungry kiddies to form a circle and begin on their eats. What piles of food they devoured - meat and salads, hot mashed potatoes ("Oh boy, mashed potatoes!"​) accompanied by bread and butter, followed by fruit salad and ice cream. Did I say ice-cream? Never have I soon so much ice-cream eaten by so few! (This applies to the helpers too). Shortly (all too shortly for the small band of helpers Rene had) lunch time came and it didn't take long for the hungry kiddies to form a circle and begin on their eats. What piles of food they devoured - meat and salads, hot mashed potatoes ("Oh boy, mashed potatoes!"​) accompanied by bread and butter, followed by fruit salad and ice cream. Did I say ice-cream? Never have I soon so much ice-cream eaten by so few! (This applies to the helpers too).
  
-Lunch over, what next? Races, of course. After the ordinary races, i.e. straight running for all age groups, the fun began. Have you ever seen a frog race? The competitor places the hands on the ground and hops the course in a squatting position. Or a duck waddle race? One gets down on one's haunches and, with hands on knees, waddles the distance! Then there was the vheelbarrow ​race - generally the barrow collapsed on the wheel and flattened the said wheel in the dust, with accompanying squeals and yells.+Lunch over, what next? Races, of course. After the ordinary races, i.e. straight running for all age groups, the fun began. Have you ever seen a frog race? The competitor places the hands on the ground and hops the course in a squatting position. Or a duck waddle race? One gets down on one's haunches and, with hands on knees, waddles the distance! Then there was the wheelbarrow ​race - generally the barrow collapsed on the wheel and flattened the said wheel in the dust, with accompanying squeals and yells.
  
 The afternoon sped by, but what is that over there? A sick child? And that? A sick Bushwalker? The excitement of the day, plus the huge lunch, had affected quite a few, and the position became nightmarish as one after another became violently ill. The afternoon sped by, but what is that over there? A sick child? And that? A sick Bushwalker? The excitement of the day, plus the huge lunch, had affected quite a few, and the position became nightmarish as one after another became violently ill.
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 ===='​Ere We Come!!==== ===='​Ere We Come!!====
  
-Applications are invited for a new era in walking! Pioneered by Racing Ratcliff'​s Burragorang burn-up. Munching on the march supersedes eating at ease, as the four-miles-an-hour minimum slows down to a steady 3 m.p.h. for lunch! We're hours overdue ​fcr the bus, but what care we? A timely lift in Rus. Wilkins'​ jallopy enables us to catch the 3 p.m. Bimlow bus at 3.15. Unionists need not apply.+Applications are invited for a new era in walking! Pioneered by Racing Ratcliff'​s Burragorang burn-up. Munching on the march supersedes eating at ease, as the four-miles-an-hour minimum slows down to a steady 3 m.p.h. for lunch! We're hours overdue ​for the bus, but what care we? A timely lift in Rus. Wilkins'​ jallopy enables us to catch the 3 p.m. Bimlow bus at 3.15. Unionists need not apply.
  
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 Jumping Jehosaphat, what a ride! You've heard the parody of course: Jumping Jehosaphat, what a ride! You've heard the parody of course:
  
-"​Oh ​milordt ​How he roared,\\+"​Oh ​milord! ​How he roared,\\
 In his old tin-fashioned Ford,\\ In his old tin-fashioned Ford,\\
 Upon the road to Gundagai!"​ Upon the road to Gundagai!"​
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 By Bona Dea. By Bona Dea.
  
-Most Bushvalkers ​have known what it is to be hungry. Only a very few have known what it is to be genuinely short of food, and realize, as Ninian Melville said on his Colo trip, that food fads did not matter, what did matter was to have some kind of food in your inside, no matter what sort. But no bushwalker has known what it is to starve. Millions of people in Europe are starving, really starving. Every loaf of bread you waste means so much less wheat to send to Europe.+Most Bushwalkers ​have known what it is to be hungry. Only a very few have known what it is to be genuinely short of food, and realize, as Ninian Melville said on his Colo trip, that food fads did not matter, what did matter was to have some kind of food in your inside, no matter what sort. But no bushwalker has known what it is to starve. Millions of people in Europe are starving, really starving. Every loaf of bread you waste means so much less wheat to send to Europe.
  
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-UPPER SHULHAVEN +=====Upper Shoalhaven.===== 
-By FRANK LtYDEN+ 
-"Ahat Marulan at lastWake Johno."​ Johno was awakened. "Time? 2 a m., Hand out the packs."​ +By Frank Leyden. 
-"Hullot ​Here come Clem and Peter frob up frot"The party assembled on platform. + 
-"​All ​heroNot Where'​sthe elite? The 'First-class passenger"​ Not in sigat+"Aha! Marulan at lastWake Johno."​ Johno was awakened. 
-The guard blow his whistle and waved his lamp, whereupon the train started moving out from the platform. + 
-"Look', Looks There he is We're here, Billt Get out, quick'​. ​Here, grab his gear, someone!"​ +"Time? 2 a m., Hand out the packs."​ 
-"Whew! He's just made itt He'll never live this down,+ 
-.A voluble crescendo of censure was unsuccessfully parried with ineffective ​refmtation:​hs ​the ten second-class and one first-class sahib bunked down on the floor of the waiting room. +"Hullo! ​Here come Clem and Peter from up front"The party assembled on the platform. 
-Came 6 a m a rising up and a stamping along the main street + 
-looking for a truck. An urchins ​screamed out "HeyYou's hikers? Dad'​s ​gain' to take yore out". So "​Dad"​ filled the radiator and brought his timber truck out into the street. We clambered aboard and after tying on the door set forth for Inverary ParkSomewhere, we passed through a gate and followed the rough road below Cooper'​s farm. About-a mile across the paddocks another gate led us into the bushHere,-wo left the truck and walked some half a mile down hill to a hut by a dam. Water was procurable in the tank, and as we breakfasted we sheltered in the hut from icy wind and rain., +"​All ​hereNo! Where'​s the elite? The First-class passenger"​ Not in sight. 
-That does the map say? Walk duo south for forty minutes and then + 
-duo oast until In see the Shoalhaven. We should then be able to pick the ridge 4?. loading ​to the junction of Norrimunga ​Creek. +The guard blew his whistle and waved his lamp, whereupon the train started moving out from the platform. 
-Well, first we beat it out across the paddocks, then into the timber. Johno startod'​off too far to left, and then too far to right of what wasn'​t ​rigerb anyway, The country became a maze of indeterminate little ridges; it was cold and it was pouring rainThe compass succumbed to instinct, and the dictator of vIrd'​ey ​weaved a vicious circle of confusion as Emaciation vied with Duty for the supremacy of left over right. + 
-Then a track arrived. This brought us to a gold diggings on top of a high ridgeStrange; we thought the Shoalhaven gold was in the river beds. Someone murmured, "​Perched river gravels",​ and another muttered, "​Reefs"​. A view opened up: below was Nerrimunga Creek in a gorge as grand and fearsome as the Upper Kowmung. As our purpose was to follow a ridge to the junction, we +"Look! Look! There he isWe're here, Bill! Get out, quickHere, grab his gear, someone!"​ 
-11. + 
-retreated north to head off the creeks, then sidled onto a north-south ridge with the Shoalhaven far below on' ​the eastern side. A track brought us out above the junction, but the ridge ahead seemed far too steep. Working to left, we came to a pecipitous creek. Water, and we had lunch. +"Whew! He's just made it! He'll never live this down.
-After lunch, we attacked what appeared to be the middle of three riason ​leading down to the junction - this ridge brought us out above everything on either handIt turned downward, and dropped with ever-increasing steepness; no more than a few yards were visible as a foreground to the depths below. But soon we found a knife-edge spur with more gradual angle; escape after all, + 
-is with no need for paraohutos,To the loft was a smooth wall of ranito out by a waterfall, whilst ahead across the creek waR a high steep ridge of talus, and to the +A voluble crescendo of censure was unsuccessfully parried with ineffective ​refutation as the ten second-class and one first-class sahib bunked down on the floor of the waiting room. 
-right the gorge of Nerrimunga Creek, ​curve back into blue distance. The + 
-knife-edge itself was easy, and led all the way to the creek. +Came 6 a.ma rising up and a stamping along the main street looking for a truck. An urchin ​screamed out "HeyYou's hikers? Dad'​s ​goin' to take yers out". So "​Dad"​ filled the radiator and brought his timber truck out into the street. We clambered aboard and after tying on the door set forth for Inverary ParkSomewhere, we passed through a gate and followed the rough road below Cooper'​s farm. About a mile across the paddocks another gate led us into the bushHere, we left the truck and walked some half a mile down hill to a hut by a dam. Water was procurable in the tank, and as we breakfasted we sheltered in the hut from icy wind and rain. 
-At last, in the solitude of the Shoalhaven ​v0 stopped to rest, and now relaxed on red-brown ​ro-cks ​in sunlight, enjoying the beauty and peace of + 
-the scene. Suddenly with a rustling in the bushes, two dogs appeared and a +What does the map say? Walk due south for forty minutes and then due east until we see the Shoalhaven. We should then be able to pick the ridge leading ​to the junction of Nerrimunga ​Creek. 
-bearded figure rushed out with a loaded shotgun. "Hat ahat Good dayYous blokes ain't the blokes been rustling my sheep, ​takint ​'em across the river?"​ Then he saw Betty and checked himself visibly. "Oh, you're a womant"? (Blushes from Bet.). His demeanour changed under Betty'​s spell, he became quite affable, + 
-This was Mr. Wells, a local, and after assuring him that we +Well, first we beat it out across the paddocks, then into the timber. Johno started ​off too far to left, and then too far to right of what wasn'​t ​rightanyway. ​The country became a maze of indeterminate little ridges; it was cold and it was pouring rainThe compass succumbed to instinct, and the dictator of wizardry ​weaved a vicious circle of confusion as Emaciation vied with Duty for the supremacy of left over right. 
-' ​knew nothing of rustling sheep, we had a long yarn about local history, gold + 
-mining and the fearsome Tallong Tiger. +Then a track arrived. This brought us to a gold diggings on top of a high ridgeStrange; we thought the Shoalhaven gold was in the river beds. Someone murmured, "​Perched river gravels",​ and another muttered, "​Reefs"​. A view opened up: below was Nerrimunga Creek in a gorge as grand and fearsome as the Upper Kowmung. As our purpose was to follow a ridge to the junction, we retreated north to head off the creeks, then sidled onto a north-south ridge with the Shoalhaven far below on the eastern side. A track brought us out above the junction, but the ridge ahead seemed far too steep. Working to left, we came to a pecipitous creek. Water, and we had lunch. 
-A Tiger at Tallong? ​Yairst ​he'd seen the beast himselfHe'd seen its spoor along the banks; he'd seen a kangaroo, the back of which had been broken at one blow, and the body fearfully mauled. Yes, and in the end he'd seen the foreign creature in a tree, one day while mustering ​sheept ​Our suggestion of a dingo received vehement denial, as he proceeded on another tale. Yes, + 
-a story of man's evil to feillow ​man, and to substantiate the yarn he produced a nugget of gold from a tin In a sugar bag. It seems that he'd become interested in a gold mining venture, and took in two partners to help him work the claim+After lunch, we attacked what appeared to be the middle of three ridges ​leading down to the junction - this ridge brought us out above everything on either handIt turned downward, and dropped with ever-increasing steepness; no more than a few yards were visible as a foreground to the depths below. But soon we found a knife-edge spur with more gradual angle; escape after all, with no need for parachutes. ​To the left was a smooth wall of granite cut by a waterfall, whilst ahead across the creek was a high steep ridge of talus, and to the right the gorge of Nerrimunga Creek, ​curved ​back into blue distance. The knife-edge itself was easy, and led all the way to the creek. 
-In dead of night the two blackguards had attempted to murder their benefactor. Such ingratitude'​. ​However, he had made a timely escape by the aid of an unloaded shotgun; and the solitary nugget ​eerves ​to perpetuate his mistrust + 
-of man. +At last, in the solitude of the Shoalhaven ​we stopped to rest, and now relaxed on red-brown ​rocks in sunlight, enjoying the beauty and peace of the scene. Suddenly with a rustling in the bushes, two dogs appeared and a bearded figure rushed out with a loaded shotgun. "Ha! aha! Good dayYous blokes ain't the blokes been rustling my sheep, ​takin' ​'em across the river?"​ Then he saw Betty and checked himself visibly. "Oh, you're a woman!"? (Blushes from Bet.). His demeanour changed under Betty'​s spell, he became quite affable
-Tillth ​doubting looks, we turned to go. The river was low and muddy. + 
-Following the right-hand bank, we came to Little ​Horseshaw ​Bend, where we camped for the night. +This was Mr. Wells, a local, and after assuring him that we knew nothing of rustling sheep, we had a long yarn about local history, gold mining and the fearsome Tallong Tiger. 
-Again we were up at six. Bacon and eggs,​harmonica and "ghoul hash" for breakfast. Big Horseshoe Bend was next on the itinerary, and + 
-after a swim we went up the track on the inside ridge. +A Tiger at Tallong? ​Yairs! ​he'd seen the beast himselfHe'd seen its spoor along the banks; he'd seen a kangaroo, the back of which had been broken at one blow, and the body fearfully mauled. Yes, and in the end he'd seen the foreign creature in a tree, one day while mustering ​sheep! ​Our suggestion of a dingo received vehement denial, as he proceeded on another tale. Yes, a story of man's evil to fellow ​man, and to substantiate the yarn he produced a nugget of gold from a tin in a sugar bag. It seems that he'd become interested in a gold mining venture, and took in two partners to help him work the claimIn dead of night the two blackguards had attempted to murder their benefactor. Such ingratitudeHowever, he had made a timely escape by the aid of an unloaded shotgun; and the solitary nugget ​serves ​to perpetuate his mistrust of man. 
-This track is plain and well graded, affording easy access to + 
-this part of the Shoalhaven. Looking downstream from the top, we had a view of the upper end of the Blockup. Four miles along the track, we found the +With doubting looks, we turned to go. The river was low and muddy. Following the right-hand bank, we came to Little ​Horseshoe ​Bend, where we camped for the night. 
-hut where we had breakfasted on the morning,..befcire ​After lunch we walked into Inveray Park, there to meet transportfor the 'eighteen miles back into 4arulan.+ 
 +Again we were up at six. Bacon and eggs, harmonica and "ghoul hash" for breakfast. Big Horseshoe Bend was next on the itinerary, and after a swim we went up the track on the inside ridge. 
 + 
 +This track is plain and well graded, affording easy access to this part of the Shoalhaven. Looking downstream from the top, we had a view of the upper end of the Blockup. Four miles along the track, we found the hut where we had breakfasted on the morning ​before. After lunch we walked into Inveray Park, there to meet transport for the eighteen miles back into Marulan. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +====Wanted.====
   ​   ​
-WANT1Dg ​"THILf-771F BUSHWKER ANNUAL" No]. 1934. lc oJ1-0(ite the sa t. Good. price. offered. WINULLO HOUSE, SYDNEY +__"The Sydney Bushwalker Annual" No.1934.__
-K70C9 or BW5275 +
-RIVMI CANOE CLUB -. TOPOGRAPHICAL SECTION+
  
-TED.. OAYNES PHILLIPS',​ 39 SILVER STREET ST. KTERS convenor of the aic54.d'​sectioin,​ advises that the following map is now available for perusal'​by -those interested. +To complete ​the setGood price offered.
-MapjNo.35. 'Web 's Creek (Hawkesbury River) Complete tidal section +
-'​Phone:​ 1A2667. +
-We are still hearitg of fish, reputedly a trout, given to a party +
-of five on the Geehi. How their eyes glisten when they tell us of. it, and how often",​ Latest estimates give its dimensions as twenty inches long, six inches deep and fifteen pounds around the girth. +
-Convulsive noises from the Committ. Room each Friday night represent nothing more than the apoplectic explosions of Joan Savage trying to knock share into aspiring stars. But we remind you: the Play Night +
-is now scheduled for May 24 _instead of May 31. Bearers of rotten eggs will be refused admission. +
-SubterfUge iS-still'​athongst us, The current Walks Programme included +
-to Mt; Guouogant but impromptu variations at the start found eight fine'​k6Ung bucks far from their scheduled Course, and all we have heard of Guouggang savours of blue distance. The car ride, acrOss the Megalong is reported to be comfortable.+
  
 +K.A. Handwood, Wingello House, Sydney.
 +
 +BW7009 or BW5275
 +
 +----
 +
 +====River Canoe Club - Topographical Section.====
 +
 +Mr. Ted. Caines Phillips, 39 Silver Street St. Peters convenor of the above section, advises that the following map is now available for perusal by those interested.
 +
 +Map No.35. Webb's Creek (Hawkesbury River) - Complete tidal section
 +
 +'​Phone:​ LA2667.
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 +We are still hearing of fish, reputedly a trout, given to a party of five on the Geehi. How their eyes glisten when they tell us of it, and how often! Latest estimates give its dimensions as twenty inches long, six inches deep and fifteen pounds around the girth.
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 +Convulsive noises from the Committ. Room each Friday night represent nothing more than the apoplectic explosions of Joan Savage trying to knock shape into aspiring stars. But we remind you: the Play Night is now scheduled for May 24 instead of May 31. Bearers of rotten eggs will be refused admission.
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 +Subterfuge is still amongst us. The current Walks Programme included a walk to Mt. Guouogang but impromptu variations at the start found eight fine young bucks far from their scheduled course, and all we have heard of Guouogang savours of blue distance. The car ride, across the Megalong is reported to be comfortable.
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194605.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/27 00:30 by tyreless