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194604 [2016/04/24 22:09]
tyreless
194604 [2016/04/25 00:31] (current)
tyreless
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 Brian Barden & Ted. Smith. Brian Barden & Ted. Smith.
  
-We came to Cooktown by way of a small R.A.A.F. crash boat and, while waiting on the jetty there for transport, we happened to ask one of the lads how far the town was and whether we could "take a '​bus"​. ​Fqr a second he looked at us in amazement and then in typical R.A.A.F. style said "Are you kiddin?"​+We came to Cooktown by way of a small R.A.A.F. crash boat and, while waiting on the jetty there for transport, we happened to ask one of the lads how far the town was and whether we could "take a '​bus"​. ​For a second he looked at us in amazement and then in typical R.A.A.F. style said "Are you kiddin?"​
  
 That just about sums up the whole place - it makes one wonder how it ever exists. The town from a distance looks very much like any other country town... the same dusty streets with the typical weatherboard buildings on either side and the inevitable assortment of cattle dogs lounging around in the shade. However, this is only from a distance. One seems to realise and feel its deadness only when one stands beside those ramshackle buildings; or in the centre of that dusty road. Most of the structures are two storied with the windows of the shops underneath boarded up, and here and there a door stands open, showing some relic of former trade. In one shop there still stand ancient barber'​s chairs where, most likely, gold miners came in days gone by to spruce up before going for entertainment at one of the many hotels that now stand empty along the main street. For the most part, however, these shops hold only huge empty shelves and counters, the dust of ages covering their vast expanses. That just about sums up the whole place - it makes one wonder how it ever exists. The town from a distance looks very much like any other country town... the same dusty streets with the typical weatherboard buildings on either side and the inevitable assortment of cattle dogs lounging around in the shade. However, this is only from a distance. One seems to realise and feel its deadness only when one stands beside those ramshackle buildings; or in the centre of that dusty road. Most of the structures are two storied with the windows of the shops underneath boarded up, and here and there a door stands open, showing some relic of former trade. In one shop there still stand ancient barber'​s chairs where, most likely, gold miners came in days gone by to spruce up before going for entertainment at one of the many hotels that now stand empty along the main street. For the most part, however, these shops hold only huge empty shelves and counters, the dust of ages covering their vast expanses.
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 The beach is a mile from town and is quite reasonable at high tide but this one and others of its kind in Northern Queensland are greatly over-rated. We would prefer even Bondi on a Sunday with its crowds to some of these mud covered expanses with never a sign of a decent "​shoot"​. The beach is a mile from town and is quite reasonable at high tide but this one and others of its kind in Northern Queensland are greatly over-rated. We would prefer even Bondi on a Sunday with its crowds to some of these mud covered expanses with never a sign of a decent "​shoot"​.
  
-Cooktown can never hope to return to its former greatness. Gold and oopper ​mining were once the magnet which attracted thousands of people to it. Now that these are gone the only contact with the outside world is by the small coastal boat "​Mirinda"​ which calls with supplies once a week. The people that are left here dream happily on; all seem contented but for a few "​strangers"​ (who have been there only ten or twelve years).+Cooktown can never hope to return to its former greatness. Gold and copper ​mining were once the magnet which attracted thousands of people to it. Now that these are gone the only contact with the outside world is by the small coastal boat "​Mirinda"​ which calls with supplies once a week. The people that are left here dream happily on; all seem contented but for a few "​strangers"​ (who have been there only ten or twelve years).
  
 Their means of livelihood baffles us. Except for the government jobs... Post Office, Police Station, etc. there seems nothing to do but drink oneself to death and that with a choice of only two pubs. Even to a Bushwalker the country would not appeal but for a few square miles out of town near the '​drome'​ which is fairly clear ground and quite pretty. Their means of livelihood baffles us. Except for the government jobs... Post Office, Police Station, etc. there seems nothing to do but drink oneself to death and that with a choice of only two pubs. Even to a Bushwalker the country would not appeal but for a few square miles out of town near the '​drome'​ which is fairly clear ground and quite pretty.
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 By "​Mumbedah"​. By "​Mumbedah"​.
  
-It is my oripicn ​that insufficient notice and careful consideration was given in the matter of determination of the nature or selection of a site of the proposed Bushwalkers War Memorial. The decision to recommend o the Federation the creation of a park on Narrow Neck Peninsula was made with undue haste, and, incidentally,​ by no means unanimously.+It is my opinion ​that insufficient notice and careful consideration was given in the matter of determination of the nature or selection of a site of the proposed Bushwalkers War Memorial. The decision to recommend o the Federation the creation of a park on Narrow Neck Peninsula was made with undue haste, and, incidentally,​ by no means unanimously.
  
 The Annual General Meeting should have been confined to the election of officers and to urgent problems where delay may embarrass the Federation or be the means of losing an opportunity. The folk present were "​caught on the hop" and I think an ill-considered decision made. The Annual General Meeting should have been confined to the election of officers and to urgent problems where delay may embarrass the Federation or be the means of losing an opportunity. The folk present were "​caught on the hop" and I think an ill-considered decision made.
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 Whatever may be the outcome of an approach to the Federation on these lines, I think this Club should, in the event of an unfavourable view being taken by the Federation Council, erect our own commemoration tablet to the memory of Gordon Smith and Gordon Manrell on Splendour Rock and I am sure any such move will receive the full approval and support of all club members. Whatever may be the outcome of an approach to the Federation on these lines, I think this Club should, in the event of an unfavourable view being taken by the Federation Council, erect our own commemoration tablet to the memory of Gordon Smith and Gordon Manrell on Splendour Rock and I am sure any such move will receive the full approval and support of all club members.
  
 +=====Through The Easter Byways.=====
  
-THROUGH THE EASIER BYWAYS 
 Allen A. Strom. Allen A. Strom.
-tert ali'o?ry Yap the Barrington Tops. See that long, + 
-drawn-cut separates the 7L1lians ​from the Chichester? ​Vhat a +Let's read this Military Map of the Barrington Tops. See that long, drawn-out ridge which separates the Williams ​from the Chichester? ​what terrific, broken, ​zig-zagging, creek-eaten ​mass of evil it isWith the egoism of the raw chum, we goaded ​ourselves ​into believing that we'd manage this ridge as we'd managed the Williams Ridge or any other decent, self-respecting, straight-forward tapering ​roof of a denuded ​landscape. 
-terrifict ​zig-zaggings ore a'​1 ​mass of evil it is With the + 
-egoinm t ;T1 chum, we goaded ​o-,​-1e17-up ​into believing that we'd manage +But then, the Barrington is different ​-- its Snow Gums ate a wretched cross between the mallee type of the Australia ​Alps and the Scribbly ​Gums of our sandstone ​tops. Good Lordthey grow everywhere, up the peaks and down, tumbled and broken or growing in groves as spindly saplings ​-- and, what is more desperate, it's impossible to take a bearing or a sight __anywhere__! The military (upon the map) says in its wisdom, -- "​complete camouflage";​ if only this were a paper of disrepute, I could have my say. 
-this ridge as w,-)d managed the or any other decent, self... + 
-respecting, straight-forward tapering ​rr)e of a denuded ​landsdape+Coming from the Tops we tried to pick that ridge -- in one -- and as we proceeded gently down and down, with rain forest just peeping over the edge to the right and left -- we breathed nervously -- breathed with fear -- and then it happened! We were hemmed in by brush! Racked with thirst and saturated with sweat, I looked at Doug. -- "Go on" he said, "the brush is better than a return through those Snow Gums". 
-But then, the Barrington is differo/,​L ​-- its Stow Gums ate a wretched cross between the mallee type of the Australia ​Lips and the Seribbly ​Gums of our sand-. ) stone tops. Good Lord they grow everywhere, up the peaks and downs tumbled and + 
-broken or growing in groves as spindly saplings and, what is more desperate, +Down and through ​-- through that pitilessly cruel vine, the Lawyer Vine; and two thousand feet below we are on the Chichester - sometimes with water round our chest, sometimes with raging, narrow gulches and maddening waterfalls -- twisting, turning -- always with the silent, green, clammy brush -- occasionally the blood-curdling,​ screaming whistle of the great black and yellow cockatoo. 
-it's impossible to take a bearing or a sight matal! The military (upon the + 
-map) says in its wisdom, -- "​complete camouflage";​ if only this were a paper of disrepute, I could have my say. +That night we slept the clock round as we lay on a flat patch hewn from the virgin forest ​-- next day we moved off with the hope that soon we would see the green swards cut by man from the army of the giant timbers; before two hours had passed, we were confronted with a narrow ravine charging down, down -- by walls of wretched hornfels -- God never made a harder rock! "What now?" my eyes asked -- and it was up and up, higher and higher, towards the crown of the ridge -- four thousand feet at the crest, the brush as thick as ever, and whistling Lyre Birds scattering at their first sight of man! For four hours we hacked and pushed, and swore, and fell -- following the ridge, following the ridge -- that confusing, ​ever-branching ridge between the Williams ​and the Chichester -- with ne'​er ​a sight worthwhile -- not a check to flutter the flagging spirit, only torn legs, torn arms, torn thighs; the tender flesh finds irritation ​from the softest rustle of the grasses. 
-Coming from the Tops we tried to pick that ridge -- in one -- and as we + 
-proceeded gently down and downs with rain forest just peeping over the edge to the right and left ..- we breathed nervously -- breathed with fear -- and +.... 
-then it happened! We were hemmed in by brush! Racked with thirst and saturated with sweat, I looked at Doug. -.- "Go on" he said, "the brush is better than a return through those Snow Gums"​. + 
-Down and through through that pitilessly cruel vines the Lawyer Vine; and two thousand feet below we are on the Chichester - sometimes with water +And so came the quiet, the calm, after exertion! The blood pounding thru' the temples; the limbs aching with excess activity; 'tis all finished and quietly we ramble along the fertile, cultivated banks of the Chichester -- the light chlorophyll green of grass and herb ending ​abruptly against the still-wooded hills. An age-old church and a school, farm-houses by a swift, crystal-clear stream, the terrors of ravine now hidden in the blue smirk of the far-off Tops, dominating the background. 
-round our chest, sometimes with raging, narrow gulches and maddening waterfalls -- twisting, turning -- always with the silent, green, clammy brush -- occasionally the blood-curdling,​ screaming whistle of the great black and yellow cockatoo. + 
-That night we slept the clock round as we lay on a flat patch hewn from the virgin forest next day we moved off with the hope that soon we would +Slowly we mooched along, ceasing to remark ​on the soft [illegible] from sheer boredom of repetition, until we enter the precincts ​of the Wanget Dam. Suffice here to say, I have seen nothing more beautiful -- Kangaroo Grass reaching to the knees, extending from dam-edge to the trailstraight, clean and upright Spotted ​Gums. Did we suffer mountain ​peak and gorge whilst here, nestling in quiet and easy simplicity, was this hidden ​valley, ​this masterpiece of colour, ​tone, and contour? For one day we faltered and caught our breath, paid homage and thought of those who must tear the muscle-tissue from the bone before their lust for bushwalking is appeased. 
-see the green swards cut by man from the army of the giant timbers; before + 
-two hours had passed, we were confronted with a narrow ravine charging ​downs down +---- 
--- by walls of wretched hornfels -- God never made a harder rock! "What now?" my eyes asked and it was up and up, higher and higher, towards the crown of the + 
-ridge -- four thousand feet at the crest, the brush as thick as ever, and +The merits of Narrow ​Neck as a park were under discussion. "It has practically no earth on it" chorussed severalWell, we have seen a number of necks with not quite so much dirt on them. 
-whistling Lyre Birds scattering at their first sight of man! For four hours VO hacked and pushed, and swore, and fell following the ridge, following + 
-the ridge -- that conftsings ​ever-branching ridge between the Wil:​liams ​and the Chichester -- with neer a sight worthwhile -- not a check to flutter the +---- 
-flagging spirit, only torn legs, torn arms, torn thighs; the tender flesh + 
-finds irritation ​fron the softest rustle of the grasses. +Who left a bottle at the Reunion campfire? Anyone answering this question is sure to receive our thanks and a black eye some dark night. 
- OS  S -  + 
-And so came the elliet, the calm, after exertion! The blood pounding thru' +---- 
-9.  +
-the temples; the limbs aching with excess activity; 'tis all finished +
-and quietly we ramble along the fertile, cultivated banks 'of the Chichester -- the light chlorophyll green of grass and herb enning ​abruptly against the still-wooded hills. An age-old church and a school, farm-houses by a swift, crystal-clear stream, the terrors of ravine now hidden in the blue smirk of the far-off Tops, dominating the background. +
-Slowly we mooched along, ceasing to rclIa77: ​on -!410, soa +
-sheer boredom of repetition, until in enter the ,​)r,​D(.14.c-LEI ​of t*.noWt 171, +
-Suffice here to say, I have seen nothing more Kanzftrno GrasJ +
-reaching to the knees, extending from dam-edNc t tho iMll tra=:,[.;ht c:Lean +
-and upright Spotted ​GwIls. Did we suffer mountain ​pur. and gorge whilst here, nestling in quiet and easy simplicity, was this hidden ​valley3 ​this masterpiece of colour, ​tonev and contour? For one day we faltered and caught our breath, paid homage and thought of those who must tear the muscle-tissue from the bone before their lust for bushwalking is appeased. +
-The merits of Narrow ​Ndck as a park were under discussion. "It has practically no earth on it" chorussed severalWell, we have seen a number of necks with not quite so much dirt on them. +
-Eho left a bottle at the Reunion campfire? Anyone answering this question is sure to receive our thanks and a black eye some dark night. +
-1.1.+
 Readers are asking, these questions. Readers are asking, these questions.
-Why was not a Government Investigator sent by plane to see the appalling living conditions in some parts of + 
-. MOorabinda+Why was not a Government Investigator sent by plane to see the appalling living conditions in some parts of Moorabinda 
 Cannot better lights be installed in the corridors at Paddy'​s for the convenience of queues in the long Winter mornings? Cannot better lights be installed in the corridors at Paddy'​s for the convenience of queues in the long Winter mornings?
-Evc r7nne should know that a psychological meteorologist is a who looks into a girl's eyes to see weather. + 
- OBBLIGATO_ ​By K.M. +---- 
-The scene was the monthly meeting of the Council of Federated Bush Walking Clubs an occasion where decorur4 ​rules, where formality holds sway; where members, though they may have shared ​ei 6ent, nay,even toothpaste, at the previous week-end, address one another ​distant y as Miss Wotherspoon or Mr.Cholmondeley as the case may be: or rather ​do not address one another at all, but make oblique references via the chairman. + 
-Sentiment and frivolity ​haVe no pl-co on the agenda, as all who have been present at a meeting will agree. +Everyone ​should know that a psychological meteorologist is a man who looks into a girl's eyes to see weather. 
-But the month was February, the night wa ho ai in the Olympian heights four floors above the council chamber dwelt a broadcasting station, which shall be nameless. Why should we give it a free plug in our popular magazine? + 
-The Federation'​s tireless secretary ​wasp as usual, one of the first to arrive. +---- 
-"I think we shall have some air" she said, flinging the windows ​vidd with the utmost abandon. + 
-Delegates trickled in by ones and twos, mopping their brows, and the meeting opened in its wonted orderly manner. Indeed there was no untoward ​circwoostances ​until the proceedings were well advanced. The trouble began quietly, one might say insidioUsly, while the secretary was reading the correspondence. +=====Obligato.===== 
-"Re toilet rooms on Cheltenham station the Commissioner for Railways writes refusing our request"​.+  
 +By K.M. 
 + 
 +The scene was the monthly meeting of the Council of Federated Bush Walking Clubs an occasion where decorum ​rules, where formality holds sway; where members, though they may have shared ​a tent, nay, even toothpaste, at the previous week-end, address one another ​distantly ​as Miss Wotherspoon or Mr.Cholmondeley as the case may be: or ratherdo not address one another at all, but make oblique references via the chairman. 
 + 
 +Sentiment and frivolity ​have no place on the agenda, as all who have been present at a meeting will agree. 
 + 
 +But the month was February, the night was hot, and in the Olympian heights four floors above the council chamber dwelt a broadcasting station, which shall be nameless. Why should we give it a free plug in our popular magazine? 
 + 
 +The Federation'​s tireless secretary ​was, as usual, one of the first to arrive. 
 + 
 +"I think we shall have some air" she said, flinging the windows ​wide with the utmost abandon. 
 + 
 +Delegates trickled in by ones and twos, mopping their brows, and the meeting opened in its wonted orderly manner. Indeed there was no untoward ​circumstances ​until the proceedings were well advanced. The trouble began quietly, one might say insidiously, while the secretary was reading the correspondence. 
 + 
 +"Re toilet rooms on Cheltenham station ​the Commissioner for Railways writes refusing our request"​. 
 "Lay your little head on my shoulder"​ screened a husky baritone voice sympathetically from upstairs. "Lay your little head on my shoulder"​ screened a husky baritone voice sympathetically from upstairs.
 +
 Ignoring the invitation the secretary continued: Ignoring the invitation the secretary continued:
-"A letter from a Mr.Golightly of Come-by-Chance,​ saying that he has a tent for sale, 8 x 6+ 
 +"A letter from a Mr.Golightly of Come-by-Chance,​ saying that he has a tent for sale, 8 x 6 -" 
 "​Whispering while you cuddle near me" the wheedling voice vent on. "​Whispering while you cuddle near me" the wheedling voice vent on.
-The meeting stirred uneasily on its hard chairs. Really, this was not the + 
-time..., +The meeting stirred uneasily on its hard chairs. Really, this was not the time... 
-"​Can'​t they shut their windows?"​ asked the Hon.Sec a little unreasonably. "They too need the air" murmured the sotto-secretary,​ blotto voce. + 
-"They appear to have it what:" said Mr.Cholmondeley,​ secretary of the Lollback Loungers. +"​Can'​t they shut their windows?"​ asked the Hon.Sec a little unreasonably. 
-"They do indeed"​ said Miss WotherspOon, guiltily checking the action of her foot which was beating time to the music.+ 
 +"They too need the air" murmured the sotto-secretary,​ blotto voce. 
 + 
 +"They appear to have itwhat!" said Mr.Cholmondeley,​ secretary of the Lollback Loungers. 
 + 
 +"They do indeed"​ said Miss Wotherspoon, guiltily checking the action of her foot which was beating time to the music. 
 "​Proceed"​ said the President. "​Proceed"​ said the President.
-"​Letter from Mr.Rufus Baggs, saying that he has reconsidered his decision to resign from the Federation.'+ 
-"​Whispering why you'​ll ​neVer leave me, whispering why you'​ll ​aver grieve me -" chimed in the voice from aloft. +"​Letter from Mr.Rufus Baggs, saying that he has reconsidered his decision to resign from the Federation ​-" 
- "​Letters from six new nembers w guiries ​re bush walking clubs"​. + 
-aw11.111. 11+"​Whispering why you'​ll ​never leave me, whispering why you'​ll ​never grieve me -" chimed in the voice from aloft. 
 + 
 +"​Letters from six new members with enquiries ​re bush walking clubs"​. 
 The orchestra finished its whispering campaign and paused before embarking on deeper seas of passion. They began the Beguine. The orchestra finished its whispering campaign and paused before embarking on deeper seas of passion. They began the Beguine.
 +
 "The Federation Reunion will be held in October as it was last year, on the week-end nearest the full moon-" "The Federation Reunion will be held in October as it was last year, on the week-end nearest the full moon-"
 +
 "It brings back a night of tropical splendour"​ sang the voice from above this time a throaty tenor. "It brings back a night of tropical splendour"​ sang the voice from above this time a throaty tenor.
-"​Letter to the fth Hostel Association. re use of hostels for conferences. It was feared thoy mig:-A degenerate into cheap boarding houses. It was reported that people even took portable gramophone and wirelesses with them", 
  
-" - and Oawn by the shore an orchestrals ​playing"​ warbled the songsteroostenutoe+"​Letter to the the Hostel Association. re use of hostels for conferences. It was feared they might degenerate into cheap boarding houses. It was reported that people even took portable gramophone and wirelesses with them"​. 
 + 
 +" - and down by the shore an orchestra'​s ​playing"​ warbled the songster, sostenuto. 
 "Re portions of land north of Burning Palms -" "Re portions of land north of Burning Palms -"
-" - and even the palms seem to be swaying -0' + 
-"the Minister for Lands writes that no satisfaction can be expected"​ the secretary went on valiantly. "Nor is anything to be hoped for as regards resumptions at +" - and even the palms seem to be swaying -
-Narrabeen"​. + 
-" and now when I hear people curse the chance they have wasted, ​know but too well what they mean" carolled the tenor with a surprising return to commonsense:​ in +"the Minister for Lands writes that no satisfaction can be expected"​ the secretary went on valiantly. "Nor is anything to be hoped for as regards resumptions at Narrabeen"​. 
-fact the words might have sprung from the lips of the secretary herself.+ 
 +" and now when I hear people curse the chance they have wasted, ​know but too well what they mean" carolled the tenor with a surprising return to commonsense:​ in fact the words might have sprung from the lips of the secretary herself. 
 "The Bouddi Working Bee will be held on the second week end in May -" "The Bouddi Working Bee will be held on the second week end in May -"
 +
 "To live it again is past all endeavour"​ the singer declared, con spirito. "To live it again is past all endeavour"​ the singer declared, con spirito.
-"By Jove, he's right there" murmured several voices approvingly,​ thinking-of tie heavy loads on them by Governor Byles in last year's punitive expedition. + 
-"Order:" said the President.+"By Jove, he's right there" murmured several voices approvingly,​ thinking of the heavy loads on them by Governor Byles in last year's punitive expedition. 
 + 
 +"Order!" said the President. 
 "Here are letters from the secretaries of several clubs which had been on the unfinancial list, apologising,​ enclosing fees and promising that the oversight will not occur again"​. "Here are letters from the secretaries of several clubs which had been on the unfinancial list, apologising,​ enclosing fees and promising that the oversight will not occur again"​.
-"and here we are, swearing to love for ever, and promising never to part" added the tenor, who was'now accompanied vocally by several other lads of the village and full orchestra. + 
-"​Louder Marie'." cried Dave above tha: din, forgetting the oblique form of address in his agitation. +"and here we are, swearing to love for ever, and promising never to part" added the tenor, who was now accompanied vocally by several other lads of the village and full orchestra. 
-The secretary obliged by raising her voice a few eamitomes+ 
-"Bush Fire Posters. Suggestions for new posters have been received - one is +"​Louder Marie!" cried Dave above the din, forgetting the oblique form of address in his agitation. 
-'Put out Your Picnic Fire' -" + 
-" - let the love that was once a fire remain an ember" sobbed the voice, con +The secretary obliged by raising her voice a few semitones. 
-fuoco e con amore. + 
-"and I would add, poor cold water on it till you can walk through it barefoot"​ continued the Secretary.+"Bush Fire Posters. Suggestions for new posters have been received - one is 'Put out Your Picnic Fire' -" 
 + 
 +" - let the love that was once a fire remain an ember" sobbed the voice, con fuoco e con amore. 
 + 
 +"and I would add, pour cold water on it till you can walk through it barefoot"​ continued the Secretary. 
 "Oh yes let them begin the Beguine -" bellowed the boys upstairs - but at this point the chairman was understood to remark that if they were just going to begin the Beguine it was time we ended, and he therefore declared the meeting closed. "Oh yes let them begin the Beguine -" bellowed the boys upstairs - but at this point the chairman was understood to remark that if they were just going to begin the Beguine it was time we ended, and he therefore declared the meeting closed.
  
-BATS IN : THE- -.BELFRY ​?  +=====Bats In The Belfry?===== 
-Well not exactly, but if we had one we'd have them in it. Instead they (the bats)content themselves with wheeling and cavorting in a super display of aerogymnastics in thegarden and the street in front of the house. Their powers of flight are amazing; they beat any bird in their ability to change direction in quick time. They appear at dusk and wing their way in silence avoiding with uncanny precision obstacles such +  
-as branches and phone wires. The lack of noise is rather +Well not exactly, but if we had one we'd have them in it. Instead they (the bats) content themselves with wheeling and cavorting in a super display of aerogymnastics in the garden and the street in front of the house. Their powers of flight are amazing; they beat any bird in their ability to change direction in quick time. They appear at dusk and wing their way in silence avoiding with uncanny precision obstacles such as branches and phone wires. The lack of noise is rather interesting for if we had bats ears we would hear quite a lot which raises the interesting question "If a noise is something which can be heard, is something we can't hear a noise?"​ Apparently the bats make plenty of noise (or should we say vibration) but is of such a frequency as cannot be detected by most human ears. I say most advisedly because I had a camping companion once who affected a very superior air because his ears were capable of hearing bat talk. Scientists ​think that the bat uses the reflections (or echoes) of these vibrations for avoiding obstacles in the dark in a similar way to the modern devices used by ships to detect ​icebergs. Nature generally gets in first with these bright ideas. 
-interesting for if we had bats ears we would hear quite a lot which raises the interesting question "If a noise is something which can be heard, is something we can't hear a noise?"​ Apparently the bats make plenty of noise (or should we say vibration) but is of such a frequency as cannot be detected + 
-by most human ears. I say most advisedly because I had a camping companion once who affected a very superior air because +---- 
-his ears were capable of hearing bat talk. Scientiets ​think that the bat uses the reflections (or echoes) of these vibrations for avoiding obstacles in the dark in a similar way to the modern devices used by ships to detect ​ioebergs. Nature generally gets in first with these bright ideas. +
-xxxxx 3C. X IC x XX+
 Paddy is pleased to advise that he now has stocks of first quality green japara for the making of tents. Orders will be accepted for any stock pattern tent. Paddy is pleased to advise that he now has stocks of first quality green japara for the making of tents. Orders will be accepted for any stock pattern tent.
- PADDY FALUN, 
-'​Phones B3101. 327 George Street SYDNEY. 
-CAMP GEAR FOR MIXERS ​ 
-. 
-el 
  
 +Paddy Pallin.
 +
 +'​Phone:​ B3101. 327 George Street Sydney.
 +
 +__Camp Gear For Walkers__
194604.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/25 00:31 by tyreless