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194602 [2016/04/21 04:23]
tyreless
194602 [2016/04/21 06:11]
tyreless
Line 79: Line 79:
 The weight of fishing gear is negligible, just a few well chosen hooks, artificial flies and a piece of line, yet in an emergency, such as getting lost, these few extras could mean sustenance for a considerable time. The weight of fishing gear is negligible, just a few well chosen hooks, artificial flies and a piece of line, yet in an emergency, such as getting lost, these few extras could mean sustenance for a considerable time.
  
-THERMOSTATS FOR BUSHWALKES ​(PART 11) By "Bush Chemist"​ +=====Thermostats For Bushwalkers ​(Part 11).===== 
-Man, though he may be cold-hearted,​ is warm-blooded,​ and his body temperature normally remains amazingly constant at 98.4 degrees F. Most folk know that the body is cooled by the evaporation of sweat from the sebaceous + 
-glands, with which the skin is abu-ede.,​1.nt1y ​provided. As it requires heat to evaporate water - ask any boiler attendant - the body loses heat according to the amount of perspiration evaporated. +By "Bush Chemist"​ 
-A noteworthy point is at once apparent. If -,ou are perspiring profusely in the body'​s ​attem-es ​to keep cool, don't mop your face. Nature intended the tieet to evaporate on the skin, and if you make it evaporate from your handl:​eeeh-i,​ef ​instead, that is so much water wasted as far as its cooling effect goes. + 
-The other side of the temrerature regulation question is how the body keeps warm. The answer is, by burning up food in muscular exertion. That may be all-very well, you say, while walking or taking other active exercise. How about when the body is at rest?+Man, though he may be cold-hearted,​ is warm-blooded,​ and his body temperature normally remains amazingly constant at 98.4 degrees F. Most folk know that the body is cooled by the evaporation of sweat from the sebaceous glands, with which the skin is abundantly ​provided. As it requires heat to evaporate water - ask any boiler attendant - the body loses heat according to the amount of perspiration evaporated. 
 + 
 +A noteworthy point is at once apparent. If you are perspiring profusely in the body'​s ​attempts ​to keep cool, don't mop your face. Nature intended the sweat to evaporate on the skin, and if you make it evaporate from your handkerchief ​instead, that is so much water wasted as far as its cooling effect goes. 
 + 
 +The other side of the temrerature regulation question is how the body keeps warm. The answer is, by burning up food in muscular exertion. That may be all very well, you say, while walking or taking other active exercise. How about when the body is at rest? 
 When the body is resting or sleeping, the majority of the required warmth comes from the muscular exertion of breathing. Should this not be sufficient to maintain that 98.4 degrees, more muscles must be exercised, so what does the body do? It shivers. When the body is resting or sleeping, the majority of the required warmth comes from the muscular exertion of breathing. Should this not be sufficient to maintain that 98.4 degrees, more muscles must be exercised, so what does the body do? It shivers.
-Once in my tenderfoot days I shivered vigorously and continuously for about four hours, while sleeping in camp at Katoombal ​in midwinter, with only one blanket between me and the cold, hard world. It was really remarkable that after a while the steady shivering made me almost comfortably warm, and certainly ​tte night passed with no ill effects, not even a cold. + 
-To warm up after that chilling reminiscence,​ let us imagine a blazing hot summer day, and a party of walkers making their way some Place, preferably to the nearest swimming pool. What headgear do they wear if they are wise?.-- white hats, the reason being that white reflects away the sun's rays, while dark colours or black trap the infra red and high frequency heat waves, converting them all to low frequency waves of tangible heat. (A further advantage of white lets if, of courne ​that they make it easier for the Search and Rescue party to see you when you ae e lost). +Once in my tenderfoot days I shivered vigorously and continuously for about four hours, while sleeping in camp at Katoomba, ​in midwinter, with only one blanket between me and the cold, hard world. It was really remarkable that after a while the steady shivering made me almost comfortably warm, and certainly ​the night passed with no ill effects, not even a cold. 
-Finalj y, a cheering note for those who dislike the chores around the camp. By an extension of the winciple ​mentioned in connection with hats, we know that a bright metallic surface such as a polished billy tends to reflect away the heat waves of your fire, while a smoked or black surface absorbs nearly allthe heat waves striking it. Hence a blackened billy will boil faster, ​Aher things being equal, than a bright and shining one. The solution is, in general, to clean only the inside of your billy and let the outside stay biztck, However, watch that you don't acquire a thick black coating of ash plus weod-tar, as this acts as an excellent insulator and often accounts for a billy which is very slow to boil. + 
-NIGHT SCENE "M. Bacon"​ +To warm up after that chilling reminiscence,​ let us imagine a blazing hot summer day, and a party of walkers making their way some place, preferably to the nearest swimming pool. What headgear do they wear if they are wise? -- white hats, the reason being that white reflects away the sun's rays, while dark colours or black trap the infra red and high frequency heat waves, converting them all to low frequency waves of tangible heat. (A further advantage of white hats is, of course, ​that they make it easier for the Search and Rescue party to see you when you are lost). 
-."HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY" was a picture noted for many things. + 
-Not the least was the glorious choral singing which was used as a background almost throughoutthe picture. +Finally, a cheering note for those who dislike the chores around the camp. By an extension of the principle ​mentioned in connection with hats, we know that a bright metallic surface such as a polished billy tends to reflect away the heat waves of your fire, while a smoked or black surface absorbs nearly all the heat waves striking it. Hence a blackened billy will boil faster, ​other things being equal, than a bright and shining one. The solution is, in general, to clean only the inside of your billy and let the outside stay black, However, watch that you don't acquire a thick black coating of ash plus wood-tar, as this acts as an excellent insulator and often accounts for a billy which is very slow to boil. 
-The same Glee Club (or rather a better one, because it was more sp,​ohtaneous) was singing in Hyde Park, London. It was a warm, moonlight + 
-night, the centuries-old plane trees the foregraund ​for a deep-blue sky, flecked with white clouds and sprinkled with stars. +=====Night Scene.===== 
-A number of groups were singing nearby - some singing hot jazz, some jv st the end of a night after a couple of pots; but the largest and most earnest was a group singing in Welsh. A man of about 40 had a crumpled penny novelette to do duty as a baton to a choir of singers who had just come to raise their voices in song. These rich and earnest voices were singing the folk-songs of Wales - young girls, old men, soldiers and passersby. Some just came to watch and wonder - like myself! + 
-One soldier, about 251 6f4n tall, who had cap to one side and a radiant expression from the sheer joy of singing, stood in the open and +"M. Bacon"​ 
-sang and sang in his native tongue - a superb bass to go with his wide, deep + 
-chest. There was a glorious soprano, full and rich, singing again with an earnestness that was most real. +"How Green Was My Valley" was a picture noted for many things. Not the least was the glorious choral singing which was used as a background almost throughout the picture. 
-Now the conductor had them singing in four parts - now in unison - + 
-now with a solo and chorus. The harmony was amazing. The group swelled as solemn men and women opened their mouths and poured out song.+The same Glee Club (or rather a better one, because it was more spontaneous) was singing in Hyde Park, London. It was a warm, moonlight night, the centuries-old plane trees the foreground ​for a deep-blue sky, flecked with white clouds and sprinkled with stars. 
 + 
 +A number of groups were singing nearby - some singing hot jazz, some just the end of a night after a couple of pots; but the largest and most earnest was a group singing in Welsh. A man of about 40 had a crumpled penny novelette to do duty as a baton to a choir of singers who had just come to raise their voices in song. These rich and earnest voices were singing the folk-songs of Wales - young girls, old men, soldiers and passersby. Some just came to watch and wonder - like myself! 
 + 
 +One soldier, about 25, 6'​4" ​tall, who had cap to one side and a radiant expression from the sheer joy of singing, stood in the open and sang and sang in his native tongue - a superb bass to go with his wide, deep chest. There was a glorious soprano, full and rich, singing again with an earnestness that was most real. 
 + 
 +Now the conductor had them singing in four parts - now in unison - now with a solo and chorus. The harmony was amazing. The group swelled as solemn men and women opened their mouths and poured out song. 
 Behind me, a tenor came up. Behind me, a tenor came up.
-I saw, right in the centre, almost overshadowed by the Conductor, a sailor lad, perhaps 17, singing with all his soul and with all the fervour of a fanatic, these songs in the Welsh tongue. Others saw him, and heads nodded ​mad eyes turned towards him to watch his enthusiasm. It was as if this lad was lonely in the great heart of London, and found full and deep friendship in this group reminding him so strongly of home. + 
-More songsRequests came from the people gathered round. Every heart was joining in, and nearly all were singing. +I saw, right in the centre, almost overshadowed by the conductor, a sailor lad, perhaps 17, singing with all his soul and with all the fervour of a fanatic, these songs in the Welsh tongue. Others saw him, and heads nodded ​and eyes turned towards him to watch his enthusiasm. It was as if this lad was lonely in the great heart of London, and found full and deep friendship in this group reminding him so strongly of home. 
-'On the edge there appeared a lean and obviously under-nourished + 
-lad, tiny neck and chin, face widening towards the temples, and crowned with a tangled, crinkly mass of gingerish hair, but - THE VOICE - a full, rich baritone, that would have done justice to a soloist in a symphony orchestra and full chorus - even for the solo in Beethoven'​s Ninth; +More songsRequests came from the people gathered round. Every heart was joining in, and nearly all were singing. 
-aune Winsbury would like to hear from anyone interested in doing a trip to the Alps (Australian) leaving Sydney the week end Lt to 3rd March next. Ring B0531 extension 236. + 
-..11,+On the edge there appeared a lean and obviously under-nourished lad, tiny neck and chin, face widening towards the temples, and crowned with a tangled, crinkly mass of gingerish hair, but - THE VOICE - a full, rich baritone, that would have done justice to a soloist in a symphony orchestra and full chorus - even for the solo in Beethoven'​s Ninth! 
 + 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +June Winsbury would like to hear from anyone interested in doing a trip to the Alps (Australian) leaving Sydney the week end 1st to 3rd March next. Ring B0531 extension 236. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 NATIONAL PARKS AND RECREATION RES:77MS NATIONAL PARKS AND RECREATION RES:77MS
 Extract from the Third Report to the Minister for Post-War Reconstruction of the Rural Reconstruction Commission. Extract from the Third Report to the Minister for Post-War Reconstruction of the Rural Reconstruction Commission.
194602.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/22 03:29 by tyreless