User Tools

Site Tools


194312

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Last revision Both sides next revision
194312 [2016/11/07 05:00]
tyreless
194312 [2016/11/08 02:28]
tyreless
Line 174: Line 174:
 ---- ----
  
-IETTERS FROM TBE LADS BILLY DUKE (continued, +=====Letters From The Lads.===== 
-This orderly carried ​the, for half a,mile - a might man is all I can say. We were packed like flies'​orithe ​jeeps, I sat on the bonnet along with two other chaps. They'​re invaluableup'this way. + 
-Reached the M.D.S. find things not to b'ight; Tojo was conducting a regular bus run in the egg laying line. His best effort was five raids before ​b eakfast ​one notning. I became converted to a walking patient here as did practicaliy everyone else in the tent. A slit trench is nuch more comforting that a stretcher raised off the groundHe has sugh a lovely daisy cutter bomb - the best I've seen. By the time I left all the tents had been dug-in which made us all much ha-rgier. Spent my birthday herebut the lads were kind and didn't wish me many happy returns of the day. +===Billy Burke (Continued):=== 
-The field ambulance unit here were doing a meesnificent ​job, it was more like an A.G.H. than a M.D.S. and their cook was co ,kin for everyone + 
-on threeprimus stoves as fires were out of the question. I t,ke my hat off to the whole crowd. The night I arrived their surgeons never stoe ed, I was the last to be done about 9 a mthe following day. +This orderly carried ​me for half a mile - a might man is all I can say. We were packed like flies on the jeeps, I sat on the bonnet along with two other chaps. They'​re invaluable up this way. 
-After a week of fun 71nd games here I finally got awly a walking patent - and once the first stage was over the going became smooth. Became a 81tretcher ​case again and did the rest of my travelling by plane. I'​m ​aefiaitely ​air miilded ​alreadyit's far better than foot slogging on those dirty, greasy barges. Think I'll' ​have to join'the parachutists. Life at presentecould ​hardly be improved on, a hospital bed and all its attendant + 
-10; +Reached the M.D.S. find things not too bright; Tojo was conducting a regular bus run in the egg laying line. His best effort was five raids before ​breakfast ​one morning. I became converted to a walking patient here as did practicaliy everyone else in the tent. A slit trench is much more comforting that a stretcher raised off the groundHe has sugh a lovely daisy cutter bomb - the best I've seen. By the time I left all the tents had been dug-in which made us all much happier. Spent my birthday herebut the lads were kind and didn't wish me many happy returns of the day. 
-Luxuries, ​However, have only been here couple of days so may change my 'mind before long. + 
-By the way I've baen talking you'll be bezinnin, ​to believe that this New Guinea is as bad as its cracked up to be, far from it; put some beer and some guns up here and it would be a pretty popular ​snot with the ladsThe rain Is heavy when it sterts ​but there are f,-,r more fine than wet days; the weather is hotbut Ilve experienced worse at our training area,in Aussie and the seille applieE ​even iTlore ​so to the denseness of ,the jungle. The nights are beautiful, jut Vflrm enough to keep one warm without a blanket. As far as the m66;,​ies ​are concerned they must be here but I haven'​t been troubled in the slightent ​up to date and I haven'​t seen a mosquito net for the past month. Have haled one and that was in the hospital ward. Tojo was the biggest surprise of all, he's treacherous and has a lot of dirty tricks such as using the dead and wounded as bait, but we're awake to them by now and he doesn'​t have much luck'in that directionWe lose good men finding out where he is, but once we know it's just too bad for him. Our main trouble is trying to keep up with him, if he stops long enough to let us have a go itts the same old story, already mentioned. He's too cunning for his own good, waits until we are right on top of him before he fires, which is all right if its only a patrol, but if it's an attack we're on t p of him before he can inflict many casultiesOnce his defences are broached he loses his head and then it'​s ​jlist "fruit for the looys"How he loves our grenade S too; it's a,joy to listen tb him screaming no moregrenades Charlie"​. The P.O.W. situation is first class - there isn't any apart from one or two for information ​-purposes. We handed one of them a grenade.(det. removed of course) to commit' h7tri keri, but he wasn't interested, just simply refused to play. I'​m ​begin nin to think that fear drives them td fight to the end and no sme perbon ​would kick, scratch and bite to prevent himself being taken. +The field ambulance unit here were doing a magnificent ​job, it was more like an A.G.H. than a M.D.S. and their cook was cooking ​for everyone on three primus stoves as fires were out of the question. I take my hat off to the whole crowd. The night I arrived their surgeons never stopped, I was the last to be done about 9 a.mthe following day. 
-I've made Paddy'​s list of gear required ​'for a light weight walker ​ldok sick; the clothes I'm wearing, ​gro,​undsheet, half a dixie and toilet gear isr - not bad and all I possessed ​"right -through the scrap. Even ,discarded the towel in favour of a handkerciliefc.Not biaat trivel:light however ​'as my old pal Lady Godiva:-IL (that'​s the bren so called ​b,Aceb:e e, she is alvvays stript,ed + 
-for aCtion) plus acceseories ​Lees 'the weight up round the 50 lbs. Food +After a week of fun and games here I finally got away a walking patent - and once the first stage was over the going became smooth. Became a stretcher ​case again and did the rest of my travelling by plane. I'​m ​definitely ​air minded ​alreadyit's far better than foot slogging on those dirty, greasy barges. Think I'll have to join the parachutists. Life at present could hardly be improved on, a hospital bed and all its attendant ​luxuries. ​However, have only been here couple of days so may change my mind before long. 
-was our main problem ​throu,;hout, a tin of bully and a :2- cket of biscuits per day perhaps. ​improved ​on this with a litqe,bit of jungle fare; natiVe tro, green paw-paws and green tem:​Inas ​either fried or boiled make a tasty dish. Taro done up as chie-ced ​potatoes is excellent. I'm afraid the natives are sky quite a few pigs and fowls, wasn't lucky enough to bump ir2to any myself, but I certainly triedAt one spot we could he-,,​r ​a rooster crowing in the JaP lines, we made elaborate plans for his welcome but whether anyone finally ​go-b + 
-him I don't know,+By the way I've baen talking you'll be beginning ​to believe that this New Guinea is as bad as its cracked up to be, far from it; put some beer and some gurls up here and it would be a pretty popular ​spot with the ladsThe rain is heavy when it starts ​but there are far more fine than wet days; the weather is hot but I'​ve ​experienced worse at our training area in Aussie and the same applies ​even more so to the denseness of the jungle. The nights are beautiful, jut warm enough to keep one warm without a blanket. As far as the mozzies ​are concerned they must be here but I haven'​t been troubled in the slightest ​up to date and I haven'​t seen a mosquito net for the past month. Have killed ​one and that was in the hospital ward. Tojo was the biggest surprise of all, he's treacherous and has a lot of dirty tricks such as using the dead and wounded as bait, but we're awake to them by now and he doesn'​t have much luck in that directionWe lose good men finding out where he is, but once we know it's just too bad for him. Our main trouble is trying to keep up with him, if he stops long enough to let us have a go it'​s ​the same old story, already mentioned. He's too cunning for his own good, waits until we are right on top of him before he fires, which is all right if it'​s ​only a patrol, but if it's an attack we're on top of him before he can inflict many casultiesOnce his defences are broached he loses his head and then it'​s ​just "fruit for the boys"How he loves our grenades ​too; it's a joy to listen tb him screaming ​"no more grenades Charlie"​. The P.O.W. situation is first class - there isn't any apart from one or two for information purposes. We handed one of them a grenade (det. removed of course) to commit ​hari kari, but he wasn't interested, just simply refused to play. I'​m ​beginning ​to think that fear drives them to fight to the end and no sane person ​would kick, scratch and bite to prevent himself being taken. 
 + 
 +I've made Paddy'​s list of gear required for a light weight walker ​look sick; the clothes I'm wearing, ​groundsheet, half a dixie and toilet gear is not bad and all I possessed right through the scrap. Even discarded the towel in favour of a handkerchief. Not that travel ​light however as my old pal Lady Godiva-IL (that'​s the bren so called ​because ​she is always stripped ​for action) plus acceseories ​keeps the weight up round the 50 lbs. mark. Food was our main problem ​throughout, a tin of bully and a packet ​of biscuits per day perhaps. ​Improved ​on this with a little ​bit of jungle fare; native taro, green paw-paws and green bananas ​either fried or boiled make a tasty dish. Taro done up as chipped ​potatoes is excellent. I'm afraid the natives are sky quite a few pigs and fowls, wasn't lucky enough to bump into any myself, but I certainly triedAt one spot we could hear a rooster crowing in the Jap lines, we made elaborate plans for his welcome but whether anyone finally ​got him I don't know
 + 
 +When we first got here four of us decided to operate a jungle juice distillery. On the boat coming over we had discussed numerous recipes and made great plans. We could even see headlines in "​Guinea Gold" "​Sparso'​s Distillery for Mango WineTropical Cocktail and the Finest Brews of Jungle Juice"​. "​Spraso"​ reckoned he got his recipes from a book that had been handed down in his family for generations. I nearly killed myself climbing cocoanut palms after the green nuts; we all sold our souls to the devil to get sugar raisins etc. and then after a week of blissful dreams had to throw the lot out. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +====="​With Swag And Billy - by H.J. Tomkins.===== 
 + 
 +A Book issued by the Government Tourist Bureau in 1910 - Described by Alex. Colley. 
 + 
 +Most of the old members can remember the day when a walker was somebody to be gaped at. If you go far away from Sydney, they still gape. Imagine what it must have been like in 1910, or before! 
 + 
 +This old book gives you a glimpse of our forerunners. They used often to walk quite long distances - up to 39 miles a day, though they seldom left a road road or a broad track. How they did it, covered from neck to toe in hot clothes, is rather astounding to modern walkers. All the photographs show the men clothed in long pants and usually with jerseys and coats. The ladies, too, exposed nothing but their faces. Even their hats were about a foot and a half wide and arranged in tiers, after the fashion of the day. Their skirts reached to within about 2 inches of the ground. On their backs they carried small swags. It must have been pretty torrid going - but - were they gone? Think of the flutter in the drawing rooms! 
 + 
 +There were mixed parties in those days too. Says the writer - "What a merry company such a mixed party is! The merest peep at one of these expeditions must suffice. It is a beautiful, clear, fresh forenoon in October. The party, having negotiated the long steep hill in front of Jenolan Caves in the early hours and breakfasted by the roadside, is making good progress towards Oberon. As it makes its way through the scented woodland, the girls form the advance guard, tripping along expectant, chatting merrily and feeling that it is a joy to be alive; the men smoke and bring up the rear - and most of the luggage. To observe the zest with which the girls enter into the more or less commonplace incidents by the way - epoch-maing events to them - is to be re-juvenated. They remark on the rude manner in which we prepare the chops for breakfast..."​ 
 + 
 +It is interesting to see how much of our present walking country was known to them. In fact, some of the walks are still done, such as Katoomba - Jenolan Caves via Nellies Glen and the Black Range. Another favourite was Wentworth Falls to Piton, which, by the way, is described as a three day trip. The country between Moss Vale and Kiama was very popular and this country has recently come back into favour. The Bell Kurrajong route was a popular one. In the days before cars these must all have been good walking. 
 + 
 +Some of the trips, on the other hand, look queer now. Watson'​s Bay to Bondi Junction: Edgecliff Road to Bellevue Hill and Parramatta to Burwood are recommended as half-day walks. This was in the days before the city spread over these areas. 
 + 
 +One of the most interesting parts of the book is the spirit of the walkers in those days. The walks are described in typically Victorian language. They were constantly being "​refreshed"​ or "​rejuvenated",​ they "​descried"​ rather than "​saw"​ things and so on. Take, for instance, the following passage - "What days were those, Parmenides! No morning paper, no post, no tram, train or boat to catch. Sky overhead, mother earth under foot, pumping God's pure air into his lungs and halting to camp at his own sweet will. Weary of limb at times and blistered feet, perhaps. But the ecstasy of it!" We wouldn'​t say it that way now, but we know just what he means. 
 + 
 +In the days before light-weight camping, before framed rucksacks, down sleeping bags and japara tents, it was a great adventure to sleep in the open for the night. The writer describes a night spent out at Little River (Megalong district), when they found the old hut too dirty to sleep in. He says, as a matter of course, - not that it mattered much, for nobody slept. 
 + 
 +These walkers of 30 years ago look funny to us. They dressed differently and they spoke differently. But they were real walkers. The bush meant the same to them as it does to us now. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====At Our Own Meeting.===== 
 + 
 +One new member, Max Nathan, was welcomed by the President. 
 + 
 +The President announced that permission to have more badges made had been refused. If any old badges are returned by resigning members they will be issued to new members. 
 + 
 +The B.S.C. is in a "high state of activity"​ at present. Christmas parcels for the ten boys overseas are already on the sea, and a further sixty are on order for some of the boys nearer home. The Committee wants people to join the Rucksack Club's pea-picking parties and give the B.S,C. 2/- in the £ of their earnings. 
 + 
 +The Katoomba Council wants to know of tracks which need repair. Paddy Pallin would be glad of any information on this. 
 + 
 +Myles Dunphy presented the Club with maps of the new Snow Leases National Park and a vote of thanks was passed to him. 
 + 
 +Mr. Bennett, Chairman of the Blue Gum Forest Trust, would like anybody visiting the forest to take some wattle seeds to plant there so as to stop the erosion of the river banks. Some discussion followed this announcement. Myles Dunphy pointed out that there would be a great danger of fire if wattle was planted there. Wattles not only burned readily but came up more thickly after a fire. He suggested Pussy Willow, Myrtle, Kanuka or Ti-tree. Ray Kirkby was against the introduction of any exotic shrubs and thought a suitable grass might be found. Marie Byles suggested asking the advice of Thistle Harris and of the Forestry Dept.
  
-When we i first got here four of us decided to operate a jungle juice 
-distillery. On the boat coming over we had discussed numerous recipes and 
-0 maeio great Plans, We couldeven see headlines in "​Guinea Gold" "​Sparso'​s 4 
-Distillery for Mango Wine, Tropical Cocktail and the Finest Brews of Jungle Juice" "​Spraso"​ reckoned he got his recipes from a book that had been handedo down in his family for generations. I nearly killed myself climbing cocoanut- , palms after the green nuts; w- all sold our souls to the ,devil to get sugar raisins etc. and then after a week of blissful dreams had to throw the lot out. 
-11. 
-WITH SWAG AND BILL" - By H. J. Tomkins ​ 
-A Book issued by the Government Tourist Bureau in 1910 - Described by Alex. Colley, 
-Most of the old members can remember the day when a walker was somebody 
-to be gaped at. If you go far away from Sydney, they still gape. Imar;ine what it must have been like in 1910, or before! 
-This old book gives you a glimpse of our forerunners. They used often to valk quite long distances - up to 39 miles a day, though they seldom left a road road or a broad track. How they did it, covered from neck to toe in hot clothes, is rather astounding to modern walkers, All the photographs show the men clothed in long pants and usually with jerseys and coats. The ladies, too, exposed nothing but their faces. Even their hats were about a foot and a half wide and arranged in tiers, after the fashion of the day. Their skirts reached to within about 2 inches of the ground. On their backs they carried small swags. It must have been pretty torrid going - but - were they gone? Think of the flutter in the drawing rooms! 
-There were mixed parties in those days too. Says the writer - What a merry company such a mixed party is The merest peep at one of these expeditions must suffice. It is a beautiful, clear, fresh forenoon in October, The party, having negotiated the long steep hill in front of Jenolan Caves in the early hours and breakfasted by the roadside, is making good progress towards Oberon. As it makes its way through the scented woodland, the girls form the advance guard, tripping along expectant, chatting merrily and feeling that it is a joy to be alive; the men smoke and bring 1213 the rear - and most of the luggage. To observe the zest with which the girls enter into the more or less commonplace incidents by the way - epoch-maing events to them- is to be re-juvenated. They remark on the rude manner in which we prepare the 
-chops for breakfast ​ 
-It is interesting to see how much of our preEent walking country was known to them. In fact, some of the walks are still done, such as Katoomba-. Jenolan Caves via Nellies Glen and the Black Range. Another favourite was Wentworth Falls to Piton, which, by the way, is described as a three day trip. The country between Moss Vale and Kiama was very popular and this country has recently come back into favour. The Bell Kurrajong route was a-' popular one. In the days before cars these must all have been good walking, 
-Some of the trips, on the other hand, look queer now. Watson'​s Bay to Bondi Junction: Edgecliff Road to Bellevue Hill and Parramatta to Burwood are recommended as half-day walks. This was in the days before the city spread over these areas, 
-One of the most interesting parts of the book is the spirit of the walkers in those days. The walks are described in typically Victorian 
-language. They were constantly being "​refreshed"​ or "​rejuvenated",​ they 
-0 
-"​descried"​ rather than "​saw"​ things and so on, Take, for instance, the 
-.. following passage - "What days were those, Parmenides! No morning paper, 
-0 no post, no tram, train or boat to catch. Sky overhead, mother earth under foot, pumping God's pure air into his lungs and halting to camp at his own sweet will. Weary of limb at times and blistered feet, perhaps. But the ecstasy of it!" We wouldn'​t say it that way now, but we know just what 
-he means. 
-In the days before light-weight camping, before framed rucksacks, down sleeping bags and japara tents, it was a great adventure to sleep in the open for the night. The writer describes a night spent out at Little River. (Megalong district), when they found the old but too dirty to sleep in. He says, as a matter of course, - not that it mattered much, for nobody slept. 
-These walkers of 30 years ago look funny to us. They dresEod differently and they spoke differently. But they were real walkers. The bush meant the same to them as it does to us now. 
-AT OUR OWN MEETING 
-One new member, Max Nathan, was welcomed by the Presid,nt, 
-The President announced that permission to have more badges made had 
-been refused, any old badges are returned by resigning members they will be issued to new members. 
-, The B.S.C. is in a "high stete of activity"​ at present. Christmas parcels for the ten boys overseas are already on the sea, and a further sixty are on order for some of the boys nearer home. The Committee wants people to join the Rucksack Club's pea-picking parties and give the B.S,C. 2/- in the k, of their earnings. 
-- The Ka,toomba Council wants to know of tracks which need repair. Paddy Pallin:​-would be glad of any information on this. 
-Myles Dunphy presented the Club with males of the new Snow Leases National Park and a vote of thanks was passed to hit. 
--Mr.Bennett,​ Chairman of the Blue Gum Forest Trust, would like anybody visiting the forest to take some wattle seeds to plant there so as to stop the erosion of the river banks.. Some discussion followed this announcement. Myles Dunphy pointed out that there would be a great danger of fire if wattle was planted there. Wattles not only burned readily but came up more thickly after a fire. He suggested Pussy Willow, Myrtle, Kanuka or Ti-tree. Ray Kirkby was against the introduction of any exotic shrubs and thought a' suitable grass might be found. Marie Byles suggested asking the advice of Thistle Harris and of the Forestry Dept. 
 Frank Ricketts and Vic Bailey were elected room stewards for the next two months. Frank Ricketts and Vic Bailey were elected room stewards for the next two months.
-SOCIAL NEWS 
-ABOUT THE XMAS PART! 
-That much looked for Annual Event - the Xmas Part - will be held in the Club Rooms on the 17th December. Dancing and games will be the order of the night and we promise a good supper - also something special in the way of novelties, 
-Come along and join in the fun - by the way, SHORTS & SPORTSWEAR are recommended as the dress for the night, 
-^ 
-ELC,C,L @g@@MW=gf,​@@Cr g,a2g1. 
-@ YOUR OPTOMETRIST 
-@ 
-F. GOODMAN M. 1.0. 
-Optometrist & Optician - 
-20 Hunter Street, Sydney. Tel. B3438 
-Modern methods of eye examination an aye training 
-Careful Spectacle Fitting, 
-0 
-@ Fixing an appointment will fncilit)te the reservation of 
- time for giving you proper attention, but should you be 
-@ unable to ring us beforehand, your visit will be welcome at any time you may choose to call. 
--@ 
-0 
  
- I +---- 
-* I I + 
-tiL@.?:LX +=====Social News.===== 
-HAPPY XMAS (NO COUPONS+ 
-Butter +===About the Xmas Party.=== 
-Sugar + 
-Tea +That much looked for Annual Event - the Xmas Party - will be held in the Club Rooms on the 17th December. Dancing and games will be the order of the night and we promise a good supper - also something special in the way of novelties. 
-Clothes + 
-Linen +Come along and join in the fun - by the way, shorts and sportswear are recommended as the dress for the night. 
-Meat (soon)+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Happy Xmas (no coupons).===== 
 + 
 +Butter, ​SugarTeaClothesLinenMeat (soon)
 All on the official ration list. All on the official ration list.
-Smokes, + 
-Films +Smokes, FilmsLiquor (walkers don't mind this of course)BooksTravel (This hurts)
-Liquor (walkers don't mind this of course)Books +
-Travel (This hurts)+
 All on the "​difficult"​ list and worst of all camping gear in short supply. All on the "​difficult"​ list and worst of all camping gear in short supply.
-Still we're not so badly off after all. Few of us (who are not in the forces) go short of food. None of us misses a night'​s sleep cringing in some shelter with the big bombrs overhead. 
-The bush has never looked so glorious and there are still a few places left to camp on within easy reach of Sydney'​s electric railways, 
-Heigho Come to the bush! 
-'​BestwishS to all Bushtalkers from -PADDY 
-You know where to find him 
  
 +Still we're not so badly off after all. Few of us (who are not in the forces) go short of food. None of us misses a night'​s sleep cringing in some shelter with the big bombers overhead.
 +
 +The bush has never looked so glorious and there are still a few places left to camp on within easy reach of Sydney'​s electric railways.
 +
 +Heigho, Come to the bush!
 +
 +Best wishes to all Bushwalkers from Paddy. You know where to find him.
 +
 +----
194312.txt · Last modified: 2016/11/08 02:33 by tyreless