User Tools

Site Tools


194301

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
194301 [2016/10/16 21:51]
tyreless
194301 [2016/10/16 21:57] (current)
tyreless
Line 16: Line 16:
 |Quiet days on "​Canobla"​|H.I.S.|2 & 3| |Quiet days on "​Canobla"​|H.I.S.|2 & 3|
 |Beautiful Asbestos|Kath McKay|3 & 4| |Beautiful Asbestos|Kath McKay|3 & 4|
-|Fears that Infest the Night|"​Uol"| 5|+|Fears that Infest the Night|"​Ubi"| 5|
 |January Flowers|Ray Birt| 6| |January Flowers|Ray Birt| 6|
 |Pink Elephants|Dot English| 7| |Pink Elephants|Dot English| 7|
Line 36: Line 36:
 ---- ----
  
-... She slid through the opening of the mia-mia and stood erect outside it stretching luxuriously. Through the trees the water was just visible, cool and grey in the morning light, and she left the camp and wandered down the hillside, stopping now and then on some rocky outcrop to look about her. She was hardly conscious of what she saw, for it was all too familiar; she looked at it not to see it, but to feel the stability which flowed from it to her. When she pushed through a grove of honey-scented wattles, or trod knee-deep among the pink boronia she did not notice their fragrance - but its absence would have touched her nerves with warning. Her reaction to her elivironment ​was that of all her people; to whom the earth was simply cradle, hunting ground and beer. Because it had never occurred to them to coerce the soil they lived ih utter harmony with it. They did not demand that it produce and produce, exhausting its fertility, but were content with what it gave them, leaving undisturbed its serene cycle of disintegration and renewal. The trees which passed, clambering down to the water'​s edge, she recognised as she would have recognised a man or woman of her tribe, and although their fallen branches would feed her fire and their dark bark fashion her canoes, they maintained, not in her thoughts, but more deeply, their place as fellow inhabitants of a land in whose earth both their lives and her own were rooted.+... She slid through the opening of the mia-mia and stood erect outside it stretching luxuriously. Through the trees the water was just visible, cool and grey in the morning light, and she left the camp and wandered down the hillside, stopping now and then on some rocky outcrop to look about her. She was hardly conscious of what she saw, for it was all too familiar; she looked at it not to see it, but to feel the stability which flowed from it to her. When she pushed through a grove of honey-scented wattles, or trod knee-deep among the pink boronia she did not notice their fragrance - but its absence would have touched her nerves with warning. Her reaction to her environment ​was that of all her people; to whom the earth was simply cradle, hunting ground and beer. Because it had never occurred to them to coerce the soil they lived in utter harmony with it. They did not demand that it produce and produce, exhausting its fertility, but were content with what it gave them, leaving undisturbed its serene cycle of disintegration and renewal. The trees which passed, clambering down to the water'​s edge, she recognised as she would have recognised a man or woman of her tribe, and although their fallen branches would feed her fire and their dark bark fashion her canoes, they maintained, not in her thoughts, but more deeply, their place as fellow inhabitants of a land in whose earth both their lives and her own were rooted.
  
 From The Timeless Land - Eleanor Dark. From The Timeless Land - Eleanor Dark.
Line 90: Line 90:
 We looked about us for mine-shafts or machinery, but saw only long trenches in the smooth dark rock. There, gleaming like moonlit water, ran the asbestos seams. Some were pale as silver, some dark as the New Zealand greenstone, some like polished jade. We broke off fragments of the brittle stuff, and shredded it in our fingers till it was a mass of silken filaments. To think that this lovely substance formed the dull asbestos of commerce! It was satin-smooth and chill to the touch, though the sun had come out between showers, and rocks and earth were warm. We looked about us for mine-shafts or machinery, but saw only long trenches in the smooth dark rock. There, gleaming like moonlit water, ran the asbestos seams. Some were pale as silver, some dark as the New Zealand greenstone, some like polished jade. We broke off fragments of the brittle stuff, and shredded it in our fingers till it was a mass of silken filaments. To think that this lovely substance formed the dull asbestos of commerce! It was satin-smooth and chill to the touch, though the sun had come out between showers, and rocks and earth were warm.
  
-We sat on the tussocky grass and wolfed bread and jam while the caretaker talked with the pent-up energy of many lonely weeks. Every couple of months he trudged to the nearest settlement, leading a pack-horse, and brought back supplies and mail. Oh yes, they got mail more often than that - when a man came to pack away a load of asbestos he generally brought any letters there were. Nom the output wasn't very large from this mine. The raw stuff was railed to the factory and carded and spun into fibre with cotton added to it, or sometimes fine brass or copper wire.+We sat on the tussocky grass and wolfed bread and jam while the caretaker talked with the pent-up energy of many lonely weeks. Every couple of months he trudged to the nearest settlement, leading a pack-horse, and brought back supplies and mail. Oh yes, they got mail more often than that - when a man came to pack away a load of asbestos he generally brought any letters there were. Now the output wasn't very large from this mine. The raw stuff was railed to the factory and carded and spun into fibre with cotton added to it, or sometimes fine brass or copper wire.
  
 We didn't export much to Britain, he said - she got most of her raw asbestos from Rhodesia and Canada. Her bill for one year's imports was somewhere over £700,000 and the annual world consumption was about 400,000 tons, and always increasing. Italy, it seemed, was the first place where commercial use was made of asbestos fibre, about 1870; but he had read that it was well known in the time of Ancient Rome. It was even mixed up in their mythology - the perpetual lamp-wick of the Vestal Virgins was said to have been asbestos. We didn't export much to Britain, he said - she got most of her raw asbestos from Rhodesia and Canada. Her bill for one year's imports was somewhere over £700,000 and the annual world consumption was about 400,000 tons, and always increasing. Italy, it seemed, was the first place where commercial use was made of asbestos fibre, about 1870; but he had read that it was well known in the time of Ancient Rome. It was even mixed up in their mythology - the perpetual lamp-wick of the Vestal Virgins was said to have been asbestos.
Line 137: Line 137:
 With more of wonder and delight?"​ With more of wonder and delight?"​
  
-This poem calls to mind an interestins ​remark of a friend of mine who was formerly an atheist. Meeting him some years after having taken up the study of flowers and plants he told me that through his studies, he was forced to the conviction that there was a guiding principal behind the universe and all its wonderful creation. One cannot help but see the work of the "high Builder"​ in the marvellous formation of flowers - their wonderful ​symetry ​an exquisite beauty.+This poem calls to mind an interesting ​remark of a friend of mine who was formerly an atheist. Meeting him some years after having taken up the study of flowers and plants he told me that through his studies, he was forced to the conviction that there was a guiding principal behind the universe and all its wonderful creation. One cannot help but see the work of the "high Builder"​ in the marvellous formation of flowers - their wonderful ​symmetry ​an exquisite beauty.
  
-One of the most prolific flowerers at the present time is the Angophora Cordifolia (Dwarf Apple). The genus Angophora, taken from the Greek Auges - a vessel, and phero - to bear - was named in allusibn ​to the goblet shaped fruit borne by its species. They were called Apple Trees by the early settlers because of the resemblance of some of the species to the orchard tree. The genus is very closely allied to the Eucalyptus, from which it differs in the usually opposite leaves and the over-lapping pointed calyx lobes, instead of the "​operculum"​ or lid of that genus. The Angophores are all trees with the exception of the Cordifolia, which is a very handsome scrub with its masses of red flower buds and large sweet scented creams white flowers, which attract large numbers of bees etc. by its abundance of easily obtained honey. The leaves are broad and whitish on the surface. The blooms are produced in short compact inflorescence. The petals are absent but the petal like sepals and numerous long white stamens form a flower approximately 1" across. It is common in the sandstone areas round Sydney and at the present time is blooming in great profusion in French'​s Forest and Kuring-gai Chase.+One of the most prolific flowerers at the present time is the Angophora Cordifolia (Dwarf Apple). The genus Angophora, taken from the Greek Auges - a vessel, and phero - to bear - was named in allusion ​to the goblet shaped fruit borne by its species. They were called Apple Trees by the early settlers because of the resemblance of some of the species to the orchard tree. The genus is very closely allied to the Eucalyptus, from which it differs in the usually opposite leaves and the over-lapping pointed calyx lobes, instead of the "​operculum"​ or lid of that genus. The Angophores are all trees with the exception of the Cordifolia, which is a very handsome scrub with its masses of red flower buds and large sweet scented creams white flowers, which attract large numbers of bees etc. by its abundance of easily obtained honey. The leaves are broad and whitish on the surface. The blooms are produced in short compact inflorescence. The petals are absent but the petal like sepals and numerous long white stamens form a flower approximately 1" across. It is common in the sandstone areas round Sydney and at the present time is blooming in great profusion in French'​s Forest and Kuring-gai Chase.
  
 Eloscarpus Cyaneus (Blueberry Ash). A remnant of the brush flora which once extended over the whole of Eastern Australia. This shrub is most attractive both in foliage, flower and fruit. The leaves are lanceolate and serrated and when young are a bright red. The delightful flowers are shower-like and spendulous and rather resemble the lily of the valley. Fruit is bright blue. The name is taken from Eloeagnus (one of the wild olives) Cyaneus-bluish-referring to the fruit. Eloscarpus Cyaneus (Blueberry Ash). A remnant of the brush flora which once extended over the whole of Eastern Australia. This shrub is most attractive both in foliage, flower and fruit. The leaves are lanceolate and serrated and when young are a bright red. The delightful flowers are shower-like and spendulous and rather resemble the lily of the valley. Fruit is bright blue. The name is taken from Eloeagnus (one of the wild olives) Cyaneus-bluish-referring to the fruit.
Line 161: Line 161:
 Our food and clothing and many of the raw materials used in industry are produced on the land. Much of the natural fauna and flora must be destroyed on land used for these purposes. We cannot sow crops in the bush, nor graze sheep on gum-leaves. But there is quite a lot of land which cannot, or need not, be used for producing the means of life. Our food and clothing and many of the raw materials used in industry are produced on the land. Much of the natural fauna and flora must be destroyed on land used for these purposes. We cannot sow crops in the bush, nor graze sheep on gum-leaves. But there is quite a lot of land which cannot, or need not, be used for producing the means of life.
  
-Most of the land which cannot be used for these purposes is barren or rough or inaccessible. These qualities, however, often enhance its value as a reservation. What could be more beautiful than the "​Barren Lands" near Kiama, or the rough grandeur of the Gangerang Range? Nor does inaccessibility rule out most places. There is probably no place in N.S.W. too inaecessible ​for Bushwalkers. But barrenness, roughness or inaccessibility does render land useless for productive purposes. This land should therefore have the first claim to reservation. It includes many of the finest scenic areas.+Most of the land which cannot be used for these purposes is barren or rough or inaccessible. These qualities, however, often enhance its value as a reservation. What could be more beautiful than the "​Barren Lands" near Kiama, or the rough grandeur of the Gangerang Range? Nor does inaccessibility rule out most places. There is probably no place in N.S.W. too inaccessible ​for Bushwalkers. But barrenness, roughness or inaccessibility does render land useless for productive purposes. This land should therefore have the first claim to reservation. It includes many of the finest scenic areas.
  
-There are also many areas which contain a little fertile land, some third rate grazing land, and scattered stands of good timber. Often the flora and fauna on this land is spoiled by indiscriminate ringbarking and burning-off,​ or by the depedations ​of timber-getters. The upper Cox Valley, where thousands of acres of poor, steep country, covered with loose granite gravel, have been rung and exposed to erosion, is a good example of this type of land. We have also seen many examples of beautiful little gullies being spoilt for the sake of a few marketable trees. There is a good case for reserving this type of country, particularly if it is near large centres of population. The Blue Mountains area is perhaps the best area of this type. Something like a million and a half people are within a few hours journey of the Blue Mountains, and they can be reached from most parts of the State within 24 hours.+There are also many areas which contain a little fertile land, some third rate grazing land, and scattered stands of good timber. Often the flora and fauna on this land is spoiled by indiscriminate ringbarking and burning-off,​ or by the depredations ​of timber-getters. The upper Cox Valley, where thousands of acres of poor, steep country, covered with loose granite gravel, have been rung and exposed to erosion, is a good example of this type of land. We have also seen many examples of beautiful little gullies being spoilt for the sake of a few marketable trees. There is a good case for reserving this type of country, particularly if it is near large centres of population. The Blue Mountains area is perhaps the best area of this type. Something like a million and a half people are within a few hours journey of the Blue Mountains, and they can be reached from most parts of the State within 24 hours.
  
-Some of the land now used for productive ​purpeses ​could well be devoted to parks or reservations. Town planners recognise this when they set aside acres of very valuable city land for parks. But once we get to the outskirts of the city we come to scrubby, untidy areas, from which everything marketable has been plundered, or where the bush has been destroyed to make way for poor subsistence farms. There is a very geod case for the creation of a "green belt" around Sydney, though it would admittedly mean the resumption of a little good farm land and a lot of poor farm . Why shouldn'​t the outskirts of the city merge into bushland instead of unsightly scrublands?+Some of the land now used for productive ​purposes ​could well be devoted to parks or reservations. Town planners recognise this when they set aside acres of very valuable city land for parks. But once we get to the outskirts of the city we come to scrubby, untidy areas, from which everything marketable has been plundered, or where the bush has been destroyed to make way for poor subsistence farms. There is a very good case for the creation of a "green belt" around Sydney, though it would admittedly mean the resumption of a little good farm land and a lot of poor farm . Why shouldn'​t the outskirts of the city merge into bushland instead of unsightly scrublands?
  
-The typos of land I have described are perhas ​the most we can hope to have reserved at the present time. But let us look into the future and suppose that a wise public authority planned the use of land. It would put our essential needs, such as food, clothing and housing, first. But it would not permit bushlands to be destroyed so as to produce materials which would be wasted. In Tasmania at present forests are being pulped to produce newsprint. Have a look at your newspaper and see how much of it is wasted in inch-high headlines and useless advertisements,​ telling you not to buy things. Was it worth destroying those trees to produce these headings and advertisements?​ As for food, how much is wasted? How much disease is caused from overeating? Countless acres have been ringbarked to graze sheep for wool. How much clothing is wasted in peace-time through trade-inspired fashion changes? Numberless similar examples of waste could be quoted. To produce these wasted commodities bushlands have been destroyed.+The typos of land I have described are perhaps ​the most we can hope to have reserved at the present time. But let us look into the future and suppose that a wise public authority planned the use of land. It would put our essential needs, such as food, clothing and housing, first. But it would not permit bushlands to be destroyed so as to produce materials which would be wasted. In Tasmania at present forests are being pulped to produce newsprint. Have a look at your newspaper and see how much of it is wasted in inch-high headlines and useless advertisements,​ telling you not to buy things. Was it worth destroying those trees to produce these headings and advertisements?​ As for food, how much is wasted? How much disease is caused from overeating? Countless acres have been ringbarked to graze sheep for wool. How much clothing is wasted in peace-time through trade-inspired fashion changes? Numberless similar examples of waste could be quoted. To produce these wasted commodities bushlands have been destroyed.
  
 In many countries the need for conservation,​ in the broad sense of preventing waste and destruction,​ has long been recognised. In Canada the Reconstruction Committee has established four sub-committees. One of those deals with "​Conservation and development of natural resources."​ In Australia, we seem bent only on developing, not on conserving. Dr. Evatt for instance, did not ask for power to conserve anything, except for powers to combat soil erosion. In many countries the need for conservation,​ in the broad sense of preventing waste and destruction,​ has long been recognised. In Canada the Reconstruction Committee has established four sub-committees. One of those deals with "​Conservation and development of natural resources."​ In Australia, we seem bent only on developing, not on conserving. Dr. Evatt for instance, did not ask for power to conserve anything, except for powers to combat soil erosion.
  
-Our country was one of the last big areas to be thrown open to the rapid and ruthkess ​exploitation made possible by modern machinery and transport. Our broad, flat fertile plains were ideally suited to great grazing properties and mechanical farming. Great flocks of sheep covered the plains in good seasons, chewing out the fine native grasses which bound the soil. In the drier areas most of the sheep would die in droughts when they had eaten out the last of the herbage, and after some years of alternate overstocking and drought there were few of the fine native grasses left. Soon the wind started to blow away the dry powdery soil and millions of acres were added to the desert. But, what did it matter? Fortunes were to be made in good seasons. On our forested mountain areas axe and fire destroyed the timber and soon the irreplaceable top-soil, built up over the centuries, was being carried down to silt up the streams. In the remaining forest areas timber-getters played havoc with the bush, wherever they could take their bullock teams. Cattle men dropped matches indiscriminately (and still do) so as to burn off the undergrowth and dry grass and provide a green shoot for their stock. The fact that thousands of acres of bushland might be destroyed and the valuable humus burnt out of the soil, didn't matter - cattle were worth £10 a head in good times.+Our country was one of the last big areas to be thrown open to the rapid and ruthless ​exploitation made possible by modern machinery and transport. Our broad, flat fertile plains were ideally suited to great grazing properties and mechanical farming. Great flocks of sheep covered the plains in good seasons, chewing out the fine native grasses which bound the soil. In the drier areas most of the sheep would die in droughts when they had eaten out the last of the herbage, and after some years of alternate overstocking and drought there were few of the fine native grasses left. Soon the wind started to blow away the dry powdery soil and millions of acres were added to the desert. But, what did it matter? Fortunes were to be made in good seasons. On our forested mountain areas axe and fire destroyed the timber and soon the irreplaceable top-soil, built up over the centuries, was being carried down to silt up the streams. In the remaining forest areas timber-getters played havoc with the bush, wherever they could take their bullock teams. Cattle men dropped matches indiscriminately (and still do) so as to burn off the undergrowth and dry grass and provide a green shoot for their stock. The fact that thousands of acres of bushland might be destroyed and the valuable humus burnt out of the soil, didn't matter - cattle were worth £10 a head in good times.
  
-Much of our bushland has been wastefully destroyed. Quite a lot still remains and can still be censerved. And perhaps some time in the future, it will be considered a crime to destroy it except to provide for real needs.+Much of our bushland has been wastefully destroyed. Quite a lot still remains and can still be conserved. And perhaps some time in the future, it will be considered a crime to destroy it except to provide for real needs.
  
 ---- ----
Line 189: Line 189:
 The weather is as good as ever it gets; the days not too hot with cool nights and only an infrequent dust storm. Even the flies are only up to half their normal strength. The wind blew from the south yesterday - the first of the winter "​blows"​ - and brought with it a dust storm. It was only a mild blow compared with some I struck last year, but was sufficient to keep us all below ground for the day. The only time I poked my head up was when the cook yelled, "come and get it". As far as tucker is concerned the situation is better than ever. The section is on what is called "post cooking",​ the rations are delivered to us and we have to cook them ourselves. A former bushman from out Hillston way was nominated cook, and he's not too bad on the pots and pans either. Provided us with a treat the other day when he turned out a batch of scones for morning tea. We are out of baking powder at present, but an s.o.s. has gone forth and as soon as it arrives he's promised us fruit fritters and one or two other luxuries. Our favourite occupation is boiling the billy, there'​s no rationing here and it usually goes on about six times a day. Seems to help pass the time away. I would have taken on the cooking myself except for the bren. It's enough for one man especially with half a dozen others loafing about the post. Between eating, sleeping and watching, the days are slipping by fairly quickly. Have to have someone on duty the whole time in case he tries anything. Occasionally we receive an alarm and all have to occupy our weapon pits for an hour or so. The weather is as good as ever it gets; the days not too hot with cool nights and only an infrequent dust storm. Even the flies are only up to half their normal strength. The wind blew from the south yesterday - the first of the winter "​blows"​ - and brought with it a dust storm. It was only a mild blow compared with some I struck last year, but was sufficient to keep us all below ground for the day. The only time I poked my head up was when the cook yelled, "come and get it". As far as tucker is concerned the situation is better than ever. The section is on what is called "post cooking",​ the rations are delivered to us and we have to cook them ourselves. A former bushman from out Hillston way was nominated cook, and he's not too bad on the pots and pans either. Provided us with a treat the other day when he turned out a batch of scones for morning tea. We are out of baking powder at present, but an s.o.s. has gone forth and as soon as it arrives he's promised us fruit fritters and one or two other luxuries. Our favourite occupation is boiling the billy, there'​s no rationing here and it usually goes on about six times a day. Seems to help pass the time away. I would have taken on the cooking myself except for the bren. It's enough for one man especially with half a dozen others loafing about the post. Between eating, sleeping and watching, the days are slipping by fairly quickly. Have to have someone on duty the whole time in case he tries anything. Occasionally we receive an alarm and all have to occupy our weapon pits for an hour or so.
  
-(next half page was censored) good honest sweat that night, We had a poker school going; which used to keep us occupied for best part of the day until "​Sykes"​ my cobber and one of the payers, got knocked. It happened on the ridge just mentioned, The ground was practically solid rock, with the result that we wore only down a couple of feet by daybreak. We should have spent the entire day under cover, but the holes were too uncomfortable,​ so a few of us got fed up and hopped out in the afternoon for a cup of tea. It as a mad thing to do. But it is in keeping with the opinion that everyone has of the Australians over here. Hermann was quite decent about the whole business and let us finish our cup of tea, before he sent his little messengers whispering past our ears. Everyone was quite happy with the outcome; we were still intact and "​Sykes",​ with a perfect blighty - a bullet through the fleshy part of the thigh - wasn't particularly disappointed with the prospects of a month or so back near civilisation. At least he'd be able to poke his head up and set a spot of leave. Jerry must be saving his shells up as he doesn'​t worry us much. Occasionally gets a rush of blood to the brain and sends over half a dozen. Have his guns tagged by now however, and know which one shoots closest to us. I've lost a bit of skin at times in my hurry to clasp mother earth to my bosom and now and again we get a laugh when someone is caught in an awkward position. Our arty pops away all day long just to let him know that they are here. Once every so often they put on a shoot and belt away a few thousand shells. They cause us more annoyance than Jerry as when the big guns open up, the ground just shudders and ahakes ​and sleep is impossible. Saw some of them firing in daylight and with each shot the guns jumped about three feet in the air. Strolled over to ---- one day and was allowed to send a souvenir over his way. Hope it did some good. Had a couple of ---- attached to us for a while learning the tricks of the trade. They were quite taken up with us and were sorry to leave. Don't blame them as they were getting decent tucker for a change and could dress as they pleased. I've been getting around barefoot and with only a pair of shorts on for the past three weeks. Haven'​t had a shave in that time either. I scored a victory a week ago. Was sitting on the edge of my sabger when up strollod ​the Brig. and the Colonel. We had quite a chat before they passed on. It's usually the other way about, I'm standing up while they remain seated. Still having no trouble from the planes. One came a little close a few days ago and I grabbed my bren and let him have a burst. Wanted to try her out firing from the shoulder. The Stukas were over a couple of times bombing a mine or so away, but our planes got amongst them one day and they'​ve sort of given up the idea. Rarely a day goes past without us hearing sounds of a "​mix-in"​ up above, but no planes have crashed close enough for me to be first to them. It's a great elief to be able to blaze away at any that come instead of just sitting and taking it.+(next half page was censored) good honest sweat that night, We had a poker school going; which used to keep us occupied for best part of the day until "​Sykes"​ my cobber and one of the payers, got knocked. It happened on the ridge just mentioned, The ground was practically solid rock, with the result that we wore only down a couple of feet by daybreak. We should have spent the entire day under cover, but the holes were too uncomfortable,​ so a few of us got fed up and hopped out in the afternoon for a cup of tea. It as a mad thing to do. But it is in keeping with the opinion that everyone has of the Australians over here. Hermann was quite decent about the whole business and let us finish our cup of tea, before he sent his little messengers whispering past our ears. Everyone was quite happy with the outcome; we were still intact and "​Sykes",​ with a perfect blighty - a bullet through the fleshy part of the thigh - wasn't particularly disappointed with the prospects of a month or so back near civilisation. At least he'd be able to poke his head up and set a spot of leave. Jerry must be saving his shells up as he doesn'​t worry us much. Occasionally gets a rush of blood to the brain and sends over half a dozen. Have his guns tagged by now however, and know which one shoots closest to us. I've lost a bit of skin at times in my hurry to clasp mother earth to my bosom and now and again we get a laugh when someone is caught in an awkward position. Our arty pops away all day long just to let him know that they are here. Once every so often they put on a shoot and belt away a few thousand shells. They cause us more annoyance than Jerry as when the big guns open up, the ground just shudders and shakes ​and sleep is impossible. Saw some of them firing in daylight and with each shot the guns jumped about three feet in the air. Strolled over to ---- one day and was allowed to send a souvenir over his way. Hope it did some good. Had a couple of ---- attached to us for a while learning the tricks of the trade. They were quite taken up with us and were sorry to leave. Don't blame them as they were getting decent tucker for a change and could dress as they pleased. I've been getting around barefoot and with only a pair of shorts on for the past three weeks. Haven'​t had a shave in that time either. I scored a victory a week ago. Was sitting on the edge of my sabger when up strolled ​the Brig. and the Colonel. We had quite a chat before they passed on. It's usually the other way about, I'm standing up while they remain seated. Still having no trouble from the planes. One came a little close a few days ago and I grabbed my bren and let him have a burst. Wanted to try her out firing from the shoulder. The Stukas were over a couple of times bombing a mine or so away, but our planes got amongst them one day and they'​ve sort of given up the idea. Rarely a day goes past without us hearing sounds of a "​mix-in"​ up above, but no planes have crashed close enough for me to be first to them. It's a great relief ​to be able to blaze away at any that come instead of just sitting and taking it.
  
 ---- ----
Line 201: Line 201:
 ===Visits to the Observatory:​=== ===Visits to the Observatory:​===
  
-This month two parties of Bushwalkers will be visiting the observatory. The following are some of the most interesting objects to be seen now through a telescope - Three planets are visible - Venus, the nearest and brightest planet, Saturn with its rings and moons, and Jupiter with its belts and seven moons. Sirius and the star cluster M41 (see diagram) are in good positions for obsrvation. The nebula in the belt of Orion will also be near the Zenith. The times at which the planets rise are in the "​Herald"​ meteorological reports. Star maps for January, and other information about these and other objects of interest, are to be found in Sir James Peck's "​Constellations"​ (now in the library) and James Nangle'​s "Stars of the Southern Heavens."​+This month two parties of Bushwalkers will be visiting the observatory. The following are some of the most interesting objects to be seen now through a telescope - Three planets are visible - Venus, the nearest and brightest planet, Saturn with its rings and moons, and Jupiter with its belts and seven moons. Sirius and the star cluster M41 (see diagram) are in good positions for observation. The nebula in the belt of Orion will also be near the Zenith. The times at which the planets rise are in the "​Herald"​ meteorological reports. Star maps for January, and other information about these and other objects of interest, are to be found in Sir James Peck's "​Constellations"​ (now in the library) and James Nangle'​s "Stars of the Southern Heavens."​
  
 ---- ----
Line 213: Line 213:
 A letter of thanks was received from the Rucksack Club for the help rendered by Ray Kirkby when Millie Horne sprained her ankle on Mount Solitary. A letter of thanks was received from the Rucksack Club for the help rendered by Ray Kirkby when Millie Horne sprained her ankle on Mount Solitary.
  
-The Services Committee sent away Christmas cards, parcels and Bushwalkor ​Annuals in November. Photographs of the Federation Reunion will be sent next.+The Services Committee sent away Christmas cards, parcels and Bushwalker ​Annuals in November. Photographs of the Federation Reunion will be sent next.
  
 At the suggestion of Tom Kenny-Roya I and Marie Byles it was decided to write to Miss Ruth Schleicher and express our appreciation of her letters written to the "​Herald"​ protesting against timber cutting on Mount Wilson. The Federation is to be asked to investigate the matter and take any necessary action. At the suggestion of Tom Kenny-Roya I and Marie Byles it was decided to write to Miss Ruth Schleicher and express our appreciation of her letters written to the "​Herald"​ protesting against timber cutting on Mount Wilson. The Federation is to be asked to investigate the matter and take any necessary action.
Line 229: Line 229:
 =====Federation News.===== =====Federation News.=====
  
-A special meeting of the Federation was held to discuss its attitude towards Youth Hostels. It was made quite clear that the trouble was our fear of destruction of the bush; that we wanted any hostels kept outside ​Primituve ​areas.+A special meeting of the Federation was held to discuss its attitude towards Youth Hostels. It was made quite clear that the trouble was our fear of destruction of the bush; that we wanted any hostels kept outside ​Primitive ​areas.
  
-Messrs. W. Roots and G.W. Kenyon were appointed delegates to the Yotth Hostels Committee.+Messrs. W. Roots and G.W. Kenyon were appointed delegates to the Youth Hostels Committee.
  
 The third annual camp was held in delightful weather. The S.B.W. was well represented in the crowd of a hundred or more who enjoyed a real, oldtime reunion. The third annual camp was held in delightful weather. The S.B.W. was well represented in the crowd of a hundred or more who enjoyed a real, oldtime reunion.
Line 270: Line 270:
 | |29th (Friday)|8 p.m.|**"​Scope Night"​**. that night of surprises. By and for the Services Committee.| | |29th (Friday)|8 p.m.|**"​Scope Night"​**. that night of surprises. By and for the Services Committee.|
 |February|17th (Friday)|8 p.m.|**"​Geology and the Bushwalker"​**. A talk by Mr. Strom.| |February|17th (Friday)|8 p.m.|**"​Geology and the Bushwalker"​**. A talk by Mr. Strom.|
-| |26th (Friday)|7.45 p.m.|**Second Watercolour Exhibition** of Australian wildflowers ​+| |26th (Friday)|7.45 p.m.|**Second Watercolour Exhibition** of Australian wildflowers. (Lent by Malcolm McGregor).|
  
 ---- ----
194301.txt · Last modified: 2016/10/16 21:57 by tyreless