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194209 [2016/03/15 03:27]
vievems
194209 [2016/03/15 04:09] (current)
vievems [From our Melbourne Correspondent]
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 "The pretty brave things thro the coldest days\\ Imprisoned in vale of brown,\\ They never lost heart, tho the blast shrieked loud\\ and the hail and the snow came down.\\ But patiently each wrought her wonderful dress,\\ Or fashioned her beautiful crown,\\ And now they are coming to lighten the world\\ Still shadowed by winter'​s frown."​ "The pretty brave things thro the coldest days\\ Imprisoned in vale of brown,\\ They never lost heart, tho the blast shrieked loud\\ and the hail and the snow came down.\\ But patiently each wrought her wonderful dress,\\ Or fashioned her beautiful crown,\\ And now they are coming to lighten the world\\ Still shadowed by winter'​s frown."​
  
 +The Springelia Incarnate (Swamp Heath) is one of the "​pretty brave things"​ brightening the world this month. It is an erect small shrub, with leaves tapering from a broad base. Each pale pink flower has a very short corolla tube and long narrow lobes and the narrow white sepels are as long as the corolla lobes. ​ Another one of the brave army is the Dillwynia Drecifolia (Parrot Pea or Eggs and Bacon). The latter name, to my mind is far too prosaic for its golden loveliness. It is one of the commonest of the bush plants, the leaves are fine and heath like and the flowers small, peashaped and so profuse that the small bushes rarely more than 3 ft. high, are literally a mass of yellow. The large back petal has a splash of red.
  
-The Springelia Incarnate (Swamp Heath) is one of the "​pretty brave things brightening the world this month. It is an erect small shrub, with leaves tapering from a broad base. Each pale pink flower has a very short corolla tube and long narrow lobes and the narrow white sepels are as long as the corolla lobes, Another one of the brave army is the Dillwynia Drecifolia (Parrot Pea or Eggs and Bacon), The latter name, to my mind is far too prosaic for its golden loveliness. It is one of the commorast of the bush plants,the leaves are fine and heath like and the flowers small, peashaped and so profuse that the small bushes rarely more than 3 ft. high, are literally a mass of yellow. The large back petal has a splash of red. +The Acacia longiflora also joins the bandflowering in great profusion on the lower Mountains at the present time, it has bright ​yellow flower heads arranged in a dense spike, often more than l" long.  Which calls to mind a marvellous picture which burst upon our sight last September. ​ As we wended our way up Con Creek prior to climbing on to the Dampier Range a golden glory met our delighted gaze, proving to be whole hillsides of wattle in full bloom. ​ And the perfumeLastly comes the Epacris ​Longiflora ​(Native Fuchsia). An erect straggling shrub with slender crimson and white tubular flowers, growing singly on short stalks and dropping from the axils of the leaves. ​ As Emerson so beautifully puts it.  May we also like the flowers bring forth from the bitterness and strife "a beautiful crown"​. 
-The Acacia longiflora also joins the bandflowering in great profusion on the lower Mountains at the present time, it has bricht ​yellow flower heads arranged in a dense spike, often more than l" long. Which calls to mind a marvellous picture which burst upon our sight last September. As we wended our way up Con Creek prior to climbing on to the Dampier Range a golden glory met our delighted gaze, proving to be whole hillsides of wattle in full bloom. And the perfumeLastly comes the Epacris ​Longiflcra ​(Native Fuchsia). An erect straggling shrub with slender crimson and white tubular flowers, growing singly on short stalks and dropping from the axils of the leaves. As Emerson so beautifully puts it. May we also like the flowers bring forth from the bitterness and strife "a beautiful crown"​. + 
-6, + 
-- +==== Visit to the Observatory ==== 
-VISIT TO THE OBSERVATORY + 
-Thursday July 16th was a groat day for the Club's stargazers. Often we had looked at the stars and wondered perhaps what that blurred patch was, or how such and such a star could possibly be, in reality, two starsOften we had read of the many beautiful objects visible through a large telescope, and few of us had ever seen them. +by "​CANOPUS"​ 
-At 8 o'​clock,​ as the sirens wailed for the commencement of a full 'test black-out, fifteen of us were groping our way through the dark to thJ door of the Observatory. A perfectly clear night and a blackout - perfect conditions for observation. We wore admitted by Mr. Rayner, who took us 42 a dark s-eiral ​staircase to the big copper dome where the sift-inch teLc-seom,​ + 
-is housed. Through the top of the dome we could see a strip of che ek-s, and +Thursday July 16th was a great day for the Club's stargazers. Often we had looked at the stars and wondered perhaps what that blurred patch was, or how such and such a star could possibly be, in reality, two stars.  ​Often we had read of the many beautiful objects visible through a large telescope, and few of us had ever seen them. 
-within the dome was one small light - all we could use in the blr=7.-;​kout- ​Soon + 
-the telescope was trained on a ptrt of the sky and one by one we into +At 8 o'​clock,​ as the sirens wailed for the commencement of a full test black-out, fifteen of us were groping our way through the dark to the door of the Observatory. ​ A perfectly clear night and a blackout - perfect conditions for observation. ​ We were admitted by Mr. Rayner, who took us up a dark spiral ​staircase to the big copper dome where the six-inch telescope ​is housed. ​ Through the top of the dome we could see a strip of the sky, and 
-regions of space far beyond the reach of ordinary eyesight. As we locked ​an intricate mechanism turned the telescope so as to follow the cur vd path +within the dome was one small light - all we could use in the blackout Soon the telescope was trained on a part of the sky and one by one we looked ​into regions of space far beyond the reach of ordinary eyesight. ​ As we looked, ​an intricate mechanism turned the telescope so as to follow the curved ​path of the stars under observation. The stars are continually moving across the sky, and would soon move out of sight in so large a telescope, if it were
-of the stars under observation. The stars are continually moving across the +
-sky, and would soon move out of sight in so large a telescope, if it were+
 fixed. fixed.
-The telescope was trained on a region in Argo where few, if any, stars are visible to the naked eye. In the yepiece ​we could see scores of bright stars + 
-over the whole circle of vision. Next we looked at a well known nebula about +The telescope was trained on a region in Argo where few, if any, stars are visible to the naked eye. In the eyepiece ​we could see scores of bright stars over the whole circle of vision. ​ Next we looked at a well known nebula about Eta Argus. We could see a great number of small stars and, beyond the clouds of luminous matter which form the nebula. ​ Then we looked at the triple star, Alpha Crucis (at the foot of the Cross). This star, which to the naked eye appears to be one bright star, is really three stars.  ​Through the telescope two bright stars could be seen, appearing ​almost to touch one another, ​although actually they are thousands of millions of miles apart. Further away was another faint star.  Next we looked at Alpha Centaurus (the larger of the two pointers) which is the second nearest star to the earth.  ​I was interested to see whether it would look round in shape, like a small sun, but it still appeared like a bright, flashing, far-away light. ​ Mr. Rayner told us that it is only with the largest telescope, of 100 inches diameter, that it is possible to measure the diameter of any of the stars. 
-Eta Argus. We could see a great number of small stars and, beyond the clouds + 
-of luminous matter which form the nebula. Then we looked at the triple star, Alpha Crucis (at the foot of the Cross). This star, which to the naked eye +Next we looked at a star cluster ​not far from the Cross. ​ This can be seen with the naked eye and looks to be a faint blue in the sky.  Seen through the small sighting telescope attached to the six-inch telescope it was like a small round cloud, or a light seen at a distance ​through ​a mist.  In the large telescope it filled the whole field of vision and was revealed as a vast number of pin-points of light against a nebulous background. ​ ​We ​were now looking at a great aggregation of stars, so far away as to appear to the naked eye as a faint blur, but actually an enormous group of stars far beyond any of the stars we can see individually with the naked eye.  It takes 20,000 years for the light of this star cluster to reach us.  ​When ​the light waves of these stars started on their journey through space our stone age ancestors were living in caves and hunting mammoth and bison on the forested ​plains of Europe. ​ ​When ​you look at this cluster you may reflect that for 20,000 years the light waves have travelled through space, and the first solid object they have encountered in their journey is the retina of your eye. 
-appears to be one bright star, is really three starsThrough the telescope ​two bright stars could be seen, a-epearing ​almost to touch one anoth:​r5 ​although actually they are thousands of millions of miles apart. Further away was another faint star. Next we looked at Alpha Centaurus (the larger of the two pointers) which is the second nearest star to the earthe ​I was interested to see whether it woula look round in shale, like a small sun, but it still appeared like a bright, flashing, far-away light. Mr. Rayner told us that it is only with the largest telescope, of 100 inches diameter, that it is possible to measure the diameter of any of the stars. + 
-Next we looked at a star clister ​not far from the Cross. This can be seen with the naked eye and looks to be a faint blue in the sky. Seen through the small sighting telescope attached to the six-inch telescope it was like a small round cloud, or a light seen at a distance ​thrnugh ​a mist. In the large telescope it filled the whole field of vision and was revealed as a vast number of pin-points of light against a nebulous background. ​'​('​e ​were now looking at a great aggregation of stars, so far away as to appear to the naked eye as a faint blur, but actually an enormous group of stars far beyond any of the stars we can see individually with the naked eye. It takes 20,000 years for the light of this star cluster to reach us. lihen the light waves of these stars started on their journey through space our stone age ancestors were living in caves and hunting mammoth and bison on the for,​sted ​plains of Europe. ​-hon you look at this cluster you may reflect that for +Lastly we looked at Antares, the first magnitude ​red star in Scorpio. ​ This is an immense star 500 times the diameter of our sun and 4,000 times more luminous. ​ The light waves from this star take 380 years to reach us, so that left about the time Queen Elizabeth ascended the throne of England. ​ Antares flashed violet and yellow in the telescope and seemed to fill the whole circle of vision with its light, to the exclusion of most other stars. Mr. Rayner said that its light did not exclude other stars from our sight, but that there happened to be few other stars in its vicinity. ​ It seemed as if a special ​place had been reserved in space for this blazing jewel. ​ For a brief space I forgot I was on solid earth and dwelt far out in space in the light of this other great blazing sun. 
-20,000 years the light waves have travelled through space, and the first solid object they have encountered in their journey is the retina of ynur eye. +
-Lastly we looked at Antares, the first maghitude ​red star in Scorpio. This is an immense star 500 times the diameter of our sun and 4,000 times more luminous. The light waves from this star take 380 years to reach us, so that left about the time Queen Elizabeth ascended the throne of England. Antares flashed violet and yellow in the telescope and seemed to fill the whole circle of vision with its light, to the exclusion of most other stars. Mr. Rayner said that its light did not exclude other stars +
-from our sight, but that there happened to be few other stars in its vicinity. It seemed as if a spacial ​place had been reserved in space for this blazing jewel. For a brief space I forgot I was on solid earth and dwelt far out in space in the light of this other great blazing sun.+
 For nearly two hours we had been taking it in turn to look through the eyepiece of the telescope, and for two hours Mr. Rayner had described and explained and had answered an almost continuous barrage of questions about almost everything in the sky, as well as the workings of the telescope. For nearly two hours we had been taking it in turn to look through the eyepiece of the telescope, and for two hours Mr. Rayner had described and explained and had answered an almost continuous barrage of questions about almost everything in the sky, as well as the workings of the telescope.
-After this he took us down to the library ​arid showed,us some lantern slides. These slides are of particular interest as they reveal on a large scale detailed photographs taken through large telescopes. A photograph of the star clister Tucanae 47, for instance, revealed a great mass of stars grouped so closely as to appear like a swarm of bees. The great nebula in Andromeda looked an almost solid mass of light, and a spiral nebula, invisible to the naked eye, occupied the whole screen. Photographs of the moon and planets showed a great deal of detail also. Mountains, craters and plains could be clearly seen on the moon.+ 
 +After this he took us down to the library ​and showed us some lantern slides. These slides are of particular interest as they reveal on a large scale detailed photographs taken through large telescopes. A photograph of the star clister Tucanae 47, for instance, revealed a great mass of stars grouped so closely as to appear like a swarm of bees.  The great nebula in Andromeda looked an almost solid mass of light, and a spiral nebula, invisible to the naked eye, occupied the whole screen. ​ Photographs of the moon and planets showed a great deal of detail also. Mountains, craters and plains could be clearly seen on the moon. 
 We had to be practically pushed out Of the observatory at 11 o'​clock,​ still asking questions in particular when the planets would be visible. November is the best month this year and we have hoped of another evening. We had to be practically pushed out Of the observatory at 11 o'​clock,​ still asking questions in particular when the planets would be visible. November is the best month this year and we have hoped of another evening.
 +
 Our thanks are due to Mr. Rayner for devoting his evening to our visit, and I am sure he has never spoken to a more fascinated audience. Our thanks are due to Mr. Rayner for devoting his evening to our visit, and I am sure he has never spoken to a more fascinated audience.
-by "​CANOPUS"​. + 
-8. +==== Whispered on the Wind ==== 
-WHISPERED ON THE WIND.+
 Members are hiding their sins very cleverly these days, or the publicity has sent them to earth. In spite of snooping round regularly on Friday nights we can't raise a thing. Members are hiding their sins very cleverly these days, or the publicity has sent them to earth. In spite of snooping round regularly on Friday nights we can't raise a thing.
-No engagements,​ no. marriages, definitely not the mating season for bushwalkers,​ though we did notice a strong tendency to touchiness in + 
-those recently engaged. +No engagements,​ no. marriages, definitely not the mating season for bushwalkers,​ though we did notice a strong tendency to touchiness in those recently engaged. 
-The latest male recruit to the ranks of the engaged, took exception + 
-to the way we spelt his fiancee's name, and we would like to say here and +The latest male recruit to the ranks of the engaged, took exception to the way we spelt his fiancée's name, and we would like to say here and now that it was just as Irish as her own, and as someone mentioned, she will be changing it soon anyway, so why worry. 
-now that it was just_as ​Irish as her own, and as someone mentioned, she + 
-will be changing it soon anyway, so why worry. +Can'​t ​__think__ ​what we have done to Joan Atthill, but she is another who reproved us for misspelling her name.  In this case we left a T out of it and couldn'​t think how it happened, till someone ​suggested ​that the shortage of tea!!! 
-Can'​t ​think what we have done to Joan Atthill, but she is another + 
-who reproved us for misspelling her name. In this case we loft a T out of it and couldn'​t think how it happened, till someone ​8uggested ​that the shortage of tea141:: +Dot English tells us she visited Brian and Jean Harvey on two successive Sundays. "​Isn'​t Brian getting beautifully ​FAT!" ​says Jean. "​Fatter"​ gurgles Brian deep down in his 7th chin. They are quite pleased with the life and Jean is developing into some cook. 
-Dot English tells us she visited Brian and Jean Harvey on two successive Sundays. "​Isn'​t Brian getting beautifully ​FATI".sayd Jean. "​Fatter"​ + 
-gurgles Brian deep down in his 7th chin. They are quite pleased with the life and Jean is developing into some cook. +==== Important Dates for your Social Calendar ==== 
-IMPORTANT DATED + 
-FOR YOUR +|Sept. 16th|Wednesday|Theatre or Picture Party - if there is anything worth seeing| 
-.SOCIAL, +|Sept. 25th|Friday|Lecture ​with slides "On the Barrier Reef" by Miss Dorothy Taylor| 
-CALENDAR +|Oct. 16th|Friday|The Bushwalker Services Committee will entertain| 
-Sept. 16th Wednesday ​THEATRE OP PICTURE PARTY - if there is anything +|Oct. 30th|Friday|Epidiascope Night please ​bring lots of interesting photographs| 
-worth seeing. +
-Sept. 25th Friday ​LECTURE ​with slides "ON THE BARRIER REEF" by +
-Miss Dorothy Taylor. +
-Oct. 16th Friday ​THE BUSHWALKER SERVICES COMMITTEE WILL ENTERTAIN. +
-Oct. 30th Friday ​EPIDIASCOPE NIGHT pleace ​bring lots of interesting photographs. +
-9.+
  
 ==== Federation Notes ==== ==== Federation Notes ====
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 There has been another surge of Bushwalking folk into Melbourne. We had a party at Perce Woodman'​s place to welcome the ex-president of...what?​....The Warrigals?​....The Coast & Mountain Walkers?​....Rover Ramblers? Alas, I There has been another surge of Bushwalking folk into Melbourne. We had a party at Perce Woodman'​s place to welcome the ex-president of...what?​....The Warrigals?​....The Coast & Mountain Walkers?​....Rover Ramblers? Alas, I
-have forgotten the lad's testimonials,​ but he is a very pleasant youth. From him we learn that Ray XX Mitchell (plus wife) are down here also the young Savage brother (plus wife also, if I have my information correct or+have forgotten the lad's testimonials,​ but he is a very pleasant youth. From him we learn that Ray (?) Mitchell (plus wife) are down here also the young Savage brother (plus wife also, if I have my information correct or
 maybe wife to be, or something like that - the old memory seems to be failing somewhat) also several other bushwalking pals of his (plus wives newly acquired). He was a bit perturbed at this toomuchness,​ this fartoomanyness maybe wife to be, or something like that - the old memory seems to be failing somewhat) also several other bushwalking pals of his (plus wives newly acquired). He was a bit perturbed at this toomuchness,​ this fartoomanyness
 in the way of matrimonial engagements,​ but boasted that he would be able to withstand the general rot from single blessedness. I was tempted to tell him that bushwalking folk from Sydney get married in Melbourne because there'​s nothing else to do, and felt like adding the story about the Esquimeaux who have only two furms of entertainment and they can't fish in the winter time. However it seemed a pity to damp his enthusiasm too early in the piece, and no doubt he will hope to do some bushwalking in Melbourne, and will hope, and will hope until the scales fall from his disillusioned eyes. Then I guess he'll get married like all his other pals. in the way of matrimonial engagements,​ but boasted that he would be able to withstand the general rot from single blessedness. I was tempted to tell him that bushwalking folk from Sydney get married in Melbourne because there'​s nothing else to do, and felt like adding the story about the Esquimeaux who have only two furms of entertainment and they can't fish in the winter time. However it seemed a pity to damp his enthusiasm too early in the piece, and no doubt he will hope to do some bushwalking in Melbourne, and will hope, and will hope until the scales fall from his disillusioned eyes. Then I guess he'll get married like all his other pals.
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 ==== Notice ==== ==== Notice ====
  
-=== New Additions to the Library ===+__New Additions to the Library__
  
 "​AUSTRALIA'​S ALPS" by Elyne Mitchell\\ "​PACIFIC WONDERLAND"​ by Charles Barrett. "​AUSTRALIA'​S ALPS" by Elyne Mitchell\\ "​PACIFIC WONDERLAND"​ by Charles Barrett.
194209.1458012473.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/03/15 03:27 by vievems