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194004 [2015/08/11 07:42]
sbw [The Grose Valley Excursions]
194004 [2019/01/29 23:47] (current)
tyreless
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 It was possible to reach the ledge above, but there were no holds. Subsequently we lassoed two trees and formed a kind of ladder in the middle. It was impossible to use either tree singly, as they were on each side of the portion we needed to climb, and to have used one or the other would have necessitated swinging over space. Once Ken was up, it was quite simple. There was one delightful spot where the rocks form a natural balcony with balustrade, from which you can look down to the river and realise the height you have made. It was possible to reach the ledge above, but there were no holds. Subsequently we lassoed two trees and formed a kind of ladder in the middle. It was impossible to use either tree singly, as they were on each side of the portion we needed to climb, and to have used one or the other would have necessitated swinging over space. Once Ken was up, it was quite simple. There was one delightful spot where the rocks form a natural balcony with balustrade, from which you can look down to the river and realise the height you have made.
  
-The most difficult portion is near the top. The creek bed divides into two chimneys, the one on the right being quite impossible, and the one on the left for some time did not look very hopeful. The rock forms a shallow ​typo of chimney with practically no walls and flat at the back,; However Ken got up and having arrived, spent a considerable time studying the balance of the cliff before lowering the rope for Colin and me. It was dreadful. The thought of not making the top after having come so far was tragic. However, having studied the position carefully, Ken lowered the rope and went up the chimney. I was a bit staggered when I saw the small rock - and more particularly the angle of the rock - to which the rope had been belayed. In those circumstances it is well to be aware of your own ignorance and have lots of faith in your leader; I decided cheerfully that "Ken knew best". We found that the difficulty which had been concerning him was a nasty corner with a drop of sixty or seventy foot beneath. There was no danger while the rock held, but it was the kind of thin lodged rock that crumbles away. However this was successfully negotiated and then it was no distance to the top.+The most difficult portion is near the top. The creek bed divides into two chimneys, the one on the right being quite impossible, and the one on the left for some time did not look very hopeful. The rock forms a shallow ​type of chimney with practically no walls and flat at the back; However Ken got up and having arrived, spent a considerable time studying the balance of the cliff before lowering the rope for Colin and me. It was dreadful. The thought of not making the top after having come so far was tragic. However, having studied the position carefully, Ken lowered the rope and went up the chimney. I was a bit staggered when I saw the small rock - and more particularly the angle of the rock - to which the rope had been belayed. In those circumstances it is well to be aware of your own ignorance and have lots of faith in your leader; I decided cheerfully that "Ken knew best". We found that the difficulty which had been concerning him was a nasty corner with a drop of sixty or seventy foot beneath. There was no danger while the rock held, but it was the kind of thin lodged rock that crumbles away. However this was successfully negotiated and then it was no distance to the top.
  
-We had talked of this climb since Eight-Hour Weekend when with Marie, Peter and Ray, we had made a set camp at the back of Mount King George and explored the tops. Now, having made our objective, we were more contented than triumphant, and all walkers know the satisfaction of a feat accomplished+We had talked of this climb since Eight-Hour Weekend when with Marie, Peter and Ray, we had made a set camp at the back of Mount King George and explored the tops. Now, having made our objective, we were more contented than triumphant, and all walkers know the satisfaction of a feat accomplished.
  
 It was a glorious morning - blue sky, fleecy clouds and a gentle breeze. It was a glorious morning - blue sky, fleecy clouds and a gentle breeze.
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-Anniversary weekend we returned to the Grose, but camped about four miles below Blue Gum. Our objective this time was what we call the Coal Mine Gully [Zobel Gully], and no doubt you have all noticed the mine on the map and the zig zag track marked loading to it. I had tried to pick out the mine from below, above and across the valley, but without success. This was not remarkable as the mine entrance we found to be facing the creek bed and entering straight into the cliff side. The shaft only goes in about twenty odd feet. We held a council of war here, and decided that Ken and Dorothy would take the right hand side of the crook, Fred Svenson and Colin the left, and I would continue up the creek bed. My way proved simple and there were evidences of wallaby tracks and, we thought, signs that this route had been used by the prospectors. From the top we had previously decided that this gully would undoubtedly prove impossible, but were anxious to "give it a go". It proved remarkably easy. Following up the creek bed there is an obvious way out to the right, and this gully can be recommended to anyone interested in a new way out of the Grose. There are well defined tracks loading to the Bell Road, but it would be best to discuss this portion with someone who has been there - unless you have plenty of time to spare. The going on the tracks is easy, and presumably they are used by cattle.+Anniversary weekend we returned to the Grose, but camped about four miles below Blue Gum. Our objective this time was what we call the Coal Mine Gully [Zobel Gully], and no doubt you have all noticed the mine on the map and the zig zag track marked loading to it. I had tried to pick out the mine from below, above and across the valley, but without success. This was not remarkable as the mine entrance we found to be facing the creek bed and entering straight into the cliff side. The shaft only goes in about twenty odd feet. We held a council of war here, and decided that Ken and Dorothy would take the right hand side of the creek, Fred Svenson and Colin the left, and I would continue up the creek bed. My way proved simple and there were evidences of wallaby tracks and, we thought, signs that this route had been used by the prospectors. From the top we had previously decided that this gully would undoubtedly prove impossible, but were anxious to "give it a go". It proved remarkably easy. Following up the creek bed there is an obvious way out to the right, and this gully can be recommended to anyone interested in a new way out of the Grose. There are well defined tracks loading to the Bell Road, but it would be best to discuss this portion with someone who has been there - unless you have plenty of time to spare. The going on the tracks is easy, and presumably they are used by cattle.
  
-Leaving the creek bed, we climbed over Mt Catey [now called Mt Caley] across another knob and then reached a very green gully [Garrad Gulch] which we had observed from the other side of the Grose and had considered looked very promising. It proved to be the most beautiful of the four gullies we had climbed, being full of tree ferns and lower down we came to a delightful running stream, which, after the murky Grose and other streams we have come to regard as usual this summer, was a real joy. We had lunch in a pleasant spot half way down, beside a pool and surrounded by tree ferns. The only snags in this descent ​wore the lower vines and the thorns of the tree forns. They were most unfriendly. There was no difficulty in climbing down to the river, and the rope was not required in either of these gullies. They are easily accessible to any walker. The last creek is roughly opposite the creek which forms the only way we know - yet - onto Mount Hay from the Grose.+Leaving the creek bed, we climbed over Mt Catey [now called Mt Caley] across another knob and then reached a very green gully [Garrad Gulch] which we had observed from the other side of the Grose and had considered looked very promising. It proved to be the most beautiful of the four gullies we had climbed, being full of tree ferns and lower down we came to a delightful running stream, which, after the murky Grose and other streams we have come to regard as usual this summer, was a real joy. We had lunch in a pleasant spot half way down, beside a pool and surrounded by tree ferns. The only snags in this descent ​were the lower vines and the thorns of the tree ferns. They were most unfriendly. There was no difficulty in climbing down to the river, and the rope was not required in either of these gullies. They are easily accessible to any walker. The last creek is roughly opposite the creek which forms the only way we know - yet - onto Mount Hay from the Grose.
  
 Both these trips proved extremely interesting,​ and undoubtedly to explore new country not knowing whether you will make it or have to turn back and retrace all the ground gained, is indeed the very spice of walking. Both these trips proved extremely interesting,​ and undoubtedly to explore new country not knowing whether you will make it or have to turn back and retrace all the ground gained, is indeed the very spice of walking.
  
 ===== Club Gossip ===== ===== Club Gossip =====
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 George Baker, who broke his ankle while skiing in New Zealand last year, is back in Sydney again with said ankle nearly as good as new. We were pleased to see George at the Re-union. George Baker, who broke his ankle while skiing in New Zealand last year, is back in Sydney again with said ankle nearly as good as new. We were pleased to see George at the Re-union.
194004.txt ยท Last modified: 2019/01/29 23:47 by tyreless