User Tools

Site Tools


193908

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
193908 [2015/12/24 05:28]
tyreless [Memories Of The Numboida]
193908 [2016/01/13 21:49] (current)
tyreless
Line 206: Line 206:
 First and foremost in bushcraft is the art of not becoming lost. I place this first because the leader, in losing his way, takes his companions with him. If he and his party are overdue, as a result, those at home are worried, search parties are sent out, and considerable concern is felt generally for their safety. First and foremost in bushcraft is the art of not becoming lost. I place this first because the leader, in losing his way, takes his companions with him. If he and his party are overdue, as a result, those at home are worried, search parties are sent out, and considerable concern is felt generally for their safety.
  
-Leadership, as in most things, is the important factor. The leader +Leadership, as in most things, is the important factor. The leader should be selected because of his greater knowledge and ability to lead. It is his duty to see that included in equipment are a compass and the best available maps. He should study the map carefully, until a rough picture of the country is in his mind, together with a sound knowledge of the tracks.
-should be selected because of his greater knowledge and ability to lead. It is his duty to see that included in equipment are a compass and the best available maps. He should study the map carefully, until a rough picture of the country is in his mind, together with a sound knowledge of the tracks.+
  
 There are three kinds of hush tracks -- formed tracks, blazed tracks and no tracks! Formed tracks present no difficulty, even to the novice. Blazed tracks are sometimes difficult, owing to their age, their poorness or their insufficiency. The two main points in following a blaze are to look for it well in advance, and to stop when it is lost. Usually one can see two or three chains ahead and pick up distance blazes, and as a result make much better time than by continually searching nearby trees. When you lose the blaze, do not blunder on, hoping to strike it again. The first move is for the leader to stay where he is and send one member of the party to the right and one to the left. The elusive blaze will soon be found. If you intend to return by the same route fix it well by hand blazing. This consists of each member of the party hand-breaking small branches and fern fronds as they walk past. There are three kinds of hush tracks -- formed tracks, blazed tracks and no tracks! Formed tracks present no difficulty, even to the novice. Blazed tracks are sometimes difficult, owing to their age, their poorness or their insufficiency. The two main points in following a blaze are to look for it well in advance, and to stop when it is lost. Usually one can see two or three chains ahead and pick up distance blazes, and as a result make much better time than by continually searching nearby trees. When you lose the blaze, do not blunder on, hoping to strike it again. The first move is for the leader to stay where he is and send one member of the party to the right and one to the left. The elusive blaze will soon be found. If you intend to return by the same route fix it well by hand blazing. This consists of each member of the party hand-breaking small branches and fern fronds as they walk past.
Line 259: Line 258:
 However, if you take the military survey map and follow these directions there is no difficulty. You go round or cross over Mount Hay on the Grose Valley side, where a narrow col (Australian "​saddle"​ Ed.) takes you to a conspicuous rocky pile, Venus Beacon. You pass to the right of this (i.e. on the opposite side to Grose Valley) and also to the right of the next hump, a densely wooded one, and this takes you onto the main ridge, which is some way back from the Grose, and keeps you away from an attractive spur with marvellous views of the Grose but leading you prematurely towards its depths. However, if you take the military survey map and follow these directions there is no difficulty. You go round or cross over Mount Hay on the Grose Valley side, where a narrow col (Australian "​saddle"​ Ed.) takes you to a conspicuous rocky pile, Venus Beacon. You pass to the right of this (i.e. on the opposite side to Grose Valley) and also to the right of the next hump, a densely wooded one, and this takes you onto the main ridge, which is some way back from the Grose, and keeps you away from an attractive spur with marvellous views of the Grose but leading you prematurely towards its depths.
  
-When on the main ridge and past the wooded hump, neglect the first large gully and the second one, and take the third - about 1 1/2 hours' walk beyond +When on the main ridge and past the wooded hump, neglect the first large gully and the second one, and take the third - about 1 1/2 hours' walk beyond Mt. Hay. You can locate this gully on the military survey as the only one whose stream is made to join the Grose. In fact, it has no water in it at all, but that does not matter. From the topography of the country you can locate it as the last gully to join the Grose before its cliffs narrow down into an extraordinarily perfect bottle-neck;​ or as joining the Grose lower down than the two green gullies you can see on the opposite side running straight up from the river to the Mount Caley (or "​Catey"​) plateau.
-Mt. Hay. You can locate this gully on the military survey as the only one whose stream is made to join the Grose. In fact, it has no water in it at all, but that does not matter. From the topography of the country you can locate it as the last gully to join the Grose before its cliffs narrow down into an extraordinarily perfect bottle-neck;​ or as joining the Grose lower down than the two green gullies you can see on the opposite side running straight up from the river to the Mount Caley (or "​Catey"​) plateau.+
  
 =====From "​Sunlit Trails":​-===== =====From "​Sunlit Trails":​-=====
Line 280: Line 278:
 That night we slept peacefully on the banks of the Nymboida. With the dawn came the DAMN flies, and after breakfast eaten on the run, we commenced our trip. That night we slept peacefully on the banks of the Nymboida. With the dawn came the DAMN flies, and after breakfast eaten on the run, we commenced our trip.
  
-The river was three feet below normal summer level and the receded waters had left the granite ​borliers ​covered with slime. What promised to be our best "​canike"​. The banks at this stage were covered with bottle-brush,​ thicker than mangroves on any coastal stream. We struggled eight miles and camped.+The river was three feet below normal summer level and the receded waters had left the granite ​borders ​covered with slime. What promised to be our best "​canike"​. The banks at this stage were covered with bottle-brush,​ thicker than mangroves on any coastal stream. We struggled eight miles and camped.
  
 That night we prayed for rain. That night we prayed for rain.
193908.txt · Last modified: 2016/01/13 21:49 by tyreless