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193906 [2015/12/23 21:30]
tyreless
193906 [2016/01/13 21:51] (current)
tyreless
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 =====At Our Own Meeting===== =====At Our Own Meeting=====
  
-Two new members were welcomed at the May meeting when Miss Gladys Roberts and Mr. Alfred Watts were admiitted ​to the Club.+Two new members were welcomed at the May meeting when Miss Gladys Roberts and Mr. Alfred Watts were admitted ​to the Club.
  
 To Maurie Berry goes the honour of being the last of a long line of Room Stewards. The Committee has decided that this office will no longer exist and that, in future, it will be the responsibility of the Social Committee to see that the Clubroom is made ready for lecturers, or whatever form of entertainment that might be on the Social Programme. To Maurie Berry goes the honour of being the last of a long line of Room Stewards. The Committee has decided that this office will no longer exist and that, in future, it will be the responsibility of the Social Committee to see that the Clubroom is made ready for lecturers, or whatever form of entertainment that might be on the Social Programme.
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 Meantime, though we cannot, without long and patient research, bring to light fully his fell and hidden purposes, we may deal with a few statements which manage to rise to the surface of the general morass. Meantime, though we cannot, without long and patient research, bring to light fully his fell and hidden purposes, we may deal with a few statements which manage to rise to the surface of the general morass.
  
-For one thing, he suggests that "​interest is lacking"​ in the monthly Federation report. How, I would like to ask, is this interest to be shown? Are we to sit with bulging eyes, open mouths, and waggling ears, in order to impress him? Assuming we are a demouratic ​institution,​ it appears to me that, having elected a person who is our nearest approach to an expert on the subject, there seems to be little that the mass of members can do. They can criticise their spokesman if they differ from him, admittedly, but if, as is generally the case, they happen to agree with his policy, are they expected to acclaim him loudly and furiously, or is their silence to be construed as indicating that they have no interest in the matter? As for what are called "​disparaging tactics",​ I am very interested in them, never having seen or heard anything to which such a peculiar description could possibly be applied.+For one thing, he suggests that "​interest is lacking"​ in the monthly Federation report. How, I would like to ask, is this interest to be shown? Are we to sit with bulging eyes, open mouths, and waggling ears, in order to impress him? Assuming we are a democratic ​institution,​ it appears to me that, having elected a person who is our nearest approach to an expert on the subject, there seems to be little that the mass of members can do. They can criticise their spokesman if they differ from him, admittedly, but if, as is generally the case, they happen to agree with his policy, are they expected to acclaim him loudly and furiously, or is their silence to be construed as indicating that they have no interest in the matter? As for what are called "​disparaging tactics",​ I am very interested in them, never having seen or heard anything to which such a peculiar description could possibly be applied.
  
 Then there is a plea for "​bigger and better attendances"​ at Club meetings. What this catch-phrase means in this connection is rather beyond me. Bigger, certainly -- but better? Is this some of his sly propaganda to improve our characters an underhand attempt to convert us to "​middle-class morality"?​ Shame! Then there is a plea for "​bigger and better attendances"​ at Club meetings. What this catch-phrase means in this connection is rather beyond me. Bigger, certainly -- but better? Is this some of his sly propaganda to improve our characters an underhand attempt to convert us to "​middle-class morality"?​ Shame!
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 It is only by a guaranteed circulation that the Publication can be a financial proposition - whilst we do not aim at making a profit, let us, at least have a square account at the end of the year. It is only by a guaranteed circulation that the Publication can be a financial proposition - whilst we do not aim at making a profit, let us, at least have a square account at the end of the year.
  
-The response of meMbers ​in creating the record, and the proven popularity of our magazine, is extremely encouraging to the Publication Staff, and on their behalf I sincerely thank members for their excellent support of our work.+The response of members ​in creating the record, and the proven popularity of our magazine, is extremely encouraging to the Publication Staff, and on their behalf I sincerely thank members for their excellent support of our work.
  
 =====Blue Mountains National Park===== =====Blue Mountains National Park=====
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 The gods and Mr. O'​Connor decided we could go. Tomorrow was clear and glorious with sunlight. Two of us, tired of dallying around the chalet where no one ever hurries and time, apparently, stands still, set off across the button grass plain. We climbed into the hills, into a patch of forest green with interlacing boughs, green with moss, where there was no track but a stream gurgling through the undergrowth and rushing over the rocks. A waterfall pours down in a silver torrent. From overhead sunlight filters through the leaves. Up, up we go! A turn and another glorious fall of water. Now we are out on the bare hillside and we find our stream entering the forest by means of a great chute - a swift, silver band cutting clean through the rock. We marvel awhile, then seek our guiding sticks. Alas! There are none. There is our party strung out on the opposite hill, a miniature gorge between us. We take the shortest route, down over a rocky incline and come upon them resting by the wayside. The gods and Mr. O'​Connor decided we could go. Tomorrow was clear and glorious with sunlight. Two of us, tired of dallying around the chalet where no one ever hurries and time, apparently, stands still, set off across the button grass plain. We climbed into the hills, into a patch of forest green with interlacing boughs, green with moss, where there was no track but a stream gurgling through the undergrowth and rushing over the rocks. A waterfall pours down in a silver torrent. From overhead sunlight filters through the leaves. Up, up we go! A turn and another glorious fall of water. Now we are out on the bare hillside and we find our stream entering the forest by means of a great chute - a swift, silver band cutting clean through the rock. We marvel awhile, then seek our guiding sticks. Alas! There are none. There is our party strung out on the opposite hill, a miniature gorge between us. We take the shortest route, down over a rocky incline and come upon them resting by the wayside.
  
-We climb the top of the Plateau and look down on Crater Lake, still, deep +We climb the top of the Plateau and look down on Crater Lake, still, deep and dark with the mountains'​ reflection. Away in the distance are mountain ranges and peaks, some blue, some with mist drifting about them. On the Plateau are pools and tiny streams all amber coloured, while from Katherine'​s Tarn flows a long waterfall into Dove Lake. Ahead stands Cradle Mountain, its great black rocks splashed with snow. Slowly, slipping in snow, crunching it underfoot, the ascent is made. Blue lakes are far below us, the silver ribbons are waterfalls, there is a great amphitheatre of rock, trees sheltering within it. Barn Bluff stands yonder, gaunt and square-topped. Suddenly, from nowhere, a mist comes roiling towards us. The Bluff is curtained, the mist closes in, the world ends with our rocky peak. The gods have given all they intend. Down we go, slipping and sliding. The horizon turns misty gold where the sun sets, a heliotrope flush fills the air. So, in the gathering dusk, we think of the chalet and presently climb the steep, slippery path to its welcome fire.
-and dark with the mountains'​ reflection. Away in the distance are mountain ranges and peaks, some blue, some with mist drifting about them. On the Plateau are pools and tiny streams all amber coloured, while from Katherine'​s Tarn flows a long waterfall into Dove Lake. Ahead stands Cradle Mountain, its great black rocks splashed with snow. Slowly, slipping in snow, crunching it underfoot, the ascent is made. Blue lakes are far below us, the silver ribbons are waterfalls, there is a great amphitheatre of rock, trees sheltering within it. Barn Bluff stands yonder, gaunt and square-topped. Suddenly, from nowhere, a mist comes roiling towards us. The Bluff is curtained, the mist closes in, the world ends with our rocky peak. The gods have given all they intend. Down we go, slipping and sliding. The horizon turns misty gold where the sun sets, a heliotrope flush fills the air. So, in the gathering dusk, we think of the chalet and presently climb the steep, slippery path to its welcome fire.+
  
 =====Federaton News===== =====Federaton News=====
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 Hilda Blunt has just returned from a trip to Cairns - on the "​Manunds",​ of course; that is Rupert'​s ship at present - and she is sparking on all twelve, so very soon now arrangements for this year's Bushwalkers'​ Ball will be in full swing. If you have not yet done so, you can note the date and place in your engagement book right now; Tuesday, August 8th, at Mark Foys. Hilda Blunt has just returned from a trip to Cairns - on the "​Manunds",​ of course; that is Rupert'​s ship at present - and she is sparking on all twelve, so very soon now arrangements for this year's Bushwalkers'​ Ball will be in full swing. If you have not yet done so, you can note the date and place in your engagement book right now; Tuesday, August 8th, at Mark Foys.
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193906.txt · Last modified: 2016/01/13 21:51 by tyreless