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193806 [2015/11/22 02:45]
elddawt Up to page eight
193806 [2015/11/23 00:41] (current)
elddawt Completed. Ready for another pair of eyes.
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 I know that if you are climbing mountains this is mighty poor advice to give. There, you must bend the knees. I know that if you are climbing mountains this is mighty poor advice to give. There, you must bend the knees.
  
-Most of the speed, as well as extra distances and much power comes from the hip swing. And, yet how seldom one sees a walker who uses it. Watch them plod along, thrusting one leg out after another, the hips kept practically on a plane all the while. Put your hips into your walk; let them swing freely with the advanced leg. You will notice that you are covering more ground and covering it more ea,​s4y ​than you ever did before.+Most of the speed, as well as extra distances and much power comes from the hip swing. And, yet how seldom one sees a walker who uses it. Watch them plod along, thrusting one leg out after another, the hips kept practically on a plane all the while. Put your hips into your walk; let them swing freely with the advanced leg. You will notice that you are covering more ground and covering it more easily ​than you ever did before.
  
-Now all you need to master is the use of the upper body, and this is not difficult. Watch your expert walker tick off the miles. You will notic that he puts every muscle he owns into it, from the crown of the head down. You'll notice particularly that he relies upon his arms for much of his speed and lift and form.+Now all you need to master is the use of the upper body, and this is not difficult. Watch your expert walker tick off the miles. You will notice ​that he puts every muscle he owns into it, from the crown of the head down. You'll notice particularly that he relies upon his arms for much of his speed and lift and form.
  
 You should let your arms help you. This means allowing the arms to swing freely; assisting them in their swinging, as a matter of fact. The upper half of the body should be kept erect, never allowed to slump over and become flat-chested. You should let your arms help you. This means allowing the arms to swing freely; assisting them in their swinging, as a matter of fact. The upper half of the body should be kept erect, never allowed to slump over and become flat-chested.
  
-Most sufrering ​is brought about by improperly fitted boots or shoes. When you buy your outdoor footgear, make sure it's plenty big, one size larger than your city shoes, a half size larger at least. As you walk a long distance more blood is pumped into the feet than in your usual, daily life and they swell. Shoes that are fine in town become tight, and pinch, in the hills.+Most suffering ​is brought about by improperly fitted boots or shoes. When you buy your outdoor footgear, make sure it's plenty big, one size larger than your city shoes, a half size larger at least. As you walk a long distance more blood is pumped into the feet than in your usual, daily life and they swell. Shoes that are fine in town become tight, and pinch, in the hills.
  
-((  Note: right margin of page eight of the scanned document is unclear. ​ A bit of guess work needs to be checked.  ))+((  Note: Right margin of page eight of the scanned document is unclear. ​ A bit of guess work.  ))
  
-If you wear shoes with arch supports at home, have arch supports in your outing boots. If not don't have them. If you wear heels in your daily world (( ** )) (( ?? unclear )) go heelless to the wood or you will walk right into trouble. In general, ​s.. heavy soles and rubber heels are the best outing shoes, because they most approximate the shoes to which youtre ac customed. If your feet are hardenr ​use of moccasins, fine, wear them,+If you wear shoes with arch supports at home, have arch supports in your outing boots. If notdon't have them. If you wear heels in your daily w? (( ?? unclear ​- guessed ​)) go heelless to the wood or you will walk right into trouble. In general, ​shoes with (( ?? unclear - guessed )) heavy soles and rubber heels are the best outing shoes, because they most nearly (( ?? unclear - guessed )) approximate the shoes to which you're accustomed. If your feet are hardened to the (( ?? unclear - guessed )) use of moccasins, fine, wear them.
  
-Now I want to give you a little counsel about the care of the feet. If feet are kept properly hardened ​yougli ​never know what blisters are, and blister:: ​are the 'bane of a walkerts ​life,+Now I want to give you a little counsel about the care of the feet. If your (( ?? unclear - guessed )) feet are kept properly hardened ​you'​ll ​never know what blisters are, and blisters ​are the bane of a walker'​s ​life.
  
-Directions: ​Fr.= your grocer or druggist obtain a ten-pound bag of rook Fa2t, the kind used in fliezing Ico cream. Take a good big double handful of it arid it into a foot-tub, or TAtzkei:, half filled with boiling hot water. Allow the oalt to dissolve while the water cc.,​11-3 ​to room temperature.+Directions: ​From your grocer or druggist obtain a ten-pound bag of rock salt, the kind used in freezing ice cream. Take a good big double handful of it and put it into a foot-tub, or bucket, half filled with boiling hot water. Allow the salt to dissolve while the water cools to room temperature.
  
-Now take this tub or buc;​ket ​and put it underneath your bed or in the corner+Now take this tub or bucket ​and put it underneath your bed or in the corner ​of the sleeping room. Every night before you go to bed, stick your two feet into the brine. Soak them for ten minutes or longer. Start this treatment two weeks before you go on your trp and you wont know you have a pair of feet along.
  
-of the sleeping room. Every night before ​you go to bedstick your two feet ITItn+Other secrets I learned will likewise serve you. Carry the hands suspended long enough and the veins are going to become distorted. Your hands will feel hotpuffy, uncomfortable. I'ts the blood rushing into them. The remedy is simple. Carry something, and change it from hand to hand.
  
-the brine. Soak them for t(Ju minutes or longer. Start this treatment two inrueko before ​you go on your trp and you wont know you have '​a ​pair of feet along,+When you're dead tired, so tired you feel you can't go on another step, take the riding crop, or the stick, or the gun you carry or fishing rodor anything and thrust it through the elbows and across the back. Put your hands in your pockets and "​ride."​ It sounds absurd, but it's true and "You just sit down and ride as you walk."
  
-Other secrets I learned will likewise serve you. Carry the hands suspn6.&​. long enough and the veins are goIng to become distorted. Your hands will feel puffy, uncomfortable. its the bl*od ra3hing into them. The remedy is simple, Carry something, and change it from hand to hand.+===== "​Misty"​ ===== 
 +(Continued ​from page 11)
  
-Vhcmi you're dead tired,, so tired you feel you can't go on another step,+Perhaps ​you have seen them at sunrise. Looking into the east when the mists are rising in Cedar Creek Valley, you will see the golden tinge on the edge of the mists as they float up and away; it is the reflection of the goblins astride their (( ?? unclear - guessed )) backs. And if you face the west you will see the silver reflections of the fairies mingling with the snowy mists. But the funny little gnomes, they seem to enjoy it most of all in the winter. Walking out on Narrow Neck on a misty winter'​s morning, you will hear them howling with delight, with voices like demonsas they goad their (( ?? unclear - guessed )) misty chargers through the protesting gum trees with gale fury. And how they delight in the terrifying surge as the mists sweep off the Neck down into the valley!
  
-the riding crop, or the stick, on the gun you carry or a fishing rod, or anythL. and thrust it through the elbows and across the back. Put your hands in your pockets and "​ride,"​ It sounds absurd, but itls true and "You just sit dawn and ride as you walk."+Thus the vow that Misty made came true!
  
-"​MISTY"​ (Continued from page 11)+----
  
-Perhaps you have seen them at sunrise. Looking into the east when the n4s are rising in Cedar Creek Valle 171 you will see the golden tinge on the edge :Jr mists as they float up and away; it is the reflection of the goblins astrid,3 +===== Stop Press:-- ===== 
- +Extra! Extra! Good news. It is now possible to travel on special week-end excursion tickets on all trains after 12.1 a.m. on Friday. ​Brisbane ​and Melbourne mails excepted. ​=====
-backs. And if you face the west you will see the silver reflections of the fall-1--,) mingling with the snowy mistsQ But the funny little gnomes, they seem to en: 4 Most of all in the winter. Walking out on Narrow Neck on a misty wintervs +
- +
-a you will hear them howling with delight, with voices like demons, as they gc&Z misty chargers through the protesting gum trees with gale fury, And how they in the terrifying surge as the mists sweep off the Neck down into the valleys +
- +
-Thus the vow that Misty made came truel +
- +
-STOP PRESS: EXTRAEXTRA: ​Good news. It is now possible to travel on special week-end excursion tickets on all +
- +
-trains after 12.1 a m. on Friday. ​Prisbane ​and Melbourne mails excepted. +
- +
-- 9 - +
- +
-JUMPING THE RATTLER+
  
 +===== Jumping the Rattler =====
 or or
 +Tramps Through A Stockman'​s Eyes
  
-TRAMPS THROUGH ​STOCKMWS EYES.+By N.A.W. Macdonald.
  
-By N,A.Yr, Macdonald.+I have travelled in most stock trains\\ From both Bourke and Broken Hill.\\ From far up north and way down south\\ From Quambone to Peak Hill.
  
-I have travelled in most stock trains From both Bourke and Broken Hill. From far up north and way down south From QuaMbone to Peak Hill.+And in my time at droving,​\\ ​I have seen a tramp or two\\ Have pitched them out and belted them\\ They'​ve pinched, my tucker too.
  
-And in my time at drovingI have seen a tramp or two+They'​ve broken seals and opened trucks,​\\ ​And got in with the sheep,\\ And sat and watched them smother;\\ Ahit makes you want to weep.
  
-Have pitched them out rad belted them+Yes? the cows are all for comfort,\\ Yet for travelling with the coal,\\ If I ever live to see one,\\ I will eat my stetson whole,
  
-They'​ve pinched, my tucker too.+===== Club Gossip =====
  
-They'​ve broken seals and opened trucks, And got in with the sheep, +On Tuesday, April 26th. Fannie and Vic. Thorsen welcomed a daughter. (Frances ​Allyn).
- +
-And sat and watched t?aem smother; Ah, it makw3 you want to weep. +
- +
-Yes? the cows are all for comfort, Yet for trav2.ng with the coal, If I ever lix') to see one, +
- +
-I will _eat ray stetson whole, +
- +
-CLUB GOSSIP. +
- +
-On Tuesday, April 26th. Fannie and Vic. Thorsen welcomed a daughter. (Frances ​A.Lyn).+
  
 Peter Page has left for England in the Ormonde, and expects to be away six months. Peter Page has left for England in the Ormonde, and expects to be away six months.
  
-On Sunday, May 8th. the S.B.W. was well represented on the official ​14.113 (111,​b ​walk from Wahroonga to Mt. Kuring-gal., via Bobbin Head, when the Junior ​Vialkiy v_rCL was formed. The age limits for ''​Bunyipsi ​were fixed officially at 9 and 15, cy2c4 small girl of 7 did the whole of the inaugural walk on her own feet. The of the large party was Laurie, aged 5, and he walked quite 2A rds. of the IArz:7, Bullyips ​are to have two official walks per month, on the third Saturday and Ch third Sunday. Renee Browne was elected first President of the Bunyip Club+On Sunday, May 8th. the S.B.W. was well represented on the official ​H.H. Club walk from Wahroonga to Mt. Kuring-gai, via Bobbin Head, when the Junior ​Walking Club was formed. The age limits for "​Bunyips" ​were fixed officially at 9 and 15, but one small girl of 7 did the whole of the inaugural walk on her own feet. The youngest ​of the large party was Laurie, aged 5, and he walked quite 2/3 rds. of the way. The Bunyips ​are to have two official walks per month, on the third Saturday and on the third Sunday. Renee Browne was elected first President of the Bunyip Club.
  
-At Sincarpia Camp last week-end Jock Kaske had his sleeping-bag eaten 1-7 rac, while he was in it. (Nos no, not the whole bag). This is plainly a case of 1,L:-LrT th,-3 hand that fed it, as Jock was one of two kindly souls who said: Donit kill it, poor things+At Sincarpia Camp last week-end Jock Kaske had his sleeping-bag eaten by rat, while he was in it. (No, no, not the whole bag). This is plainly a case of biting the hand that fed it, as Jock was one of two kindly souls who said: Don'​t ​kill it, poor thing!
  
-A cheery letter has been received from Jeane and Gordon Mannell, reporting (a) that they are still happy th:​mgh ​marriedand (b) that Jeanets ​first cako was a great success. These two stataments are evadently ​closely connected. Has it ilot been said: Peed the brute? +A cheery letter has been received from Jeane and Gordon Mannell, reporting (a) that they are still happy though ​marriedand (b) that Jeane'​s ​first cake was a great success. These two stataments are evidently ​closely connected. Has it not been said: Feed the brute?
- +
-s;k +
- +
- "​s.;​ +
- +
- , +
- +
-  +
- +
-"​M:​L6TY"​+
  
 +===== "​Misty"​ =====
 (The Story of the Blue Mountain Mists) (The Story of the Blue Mountain Mists)
  
 By Bill Mullins. By Bill Mullins.
  
-Many many years ago there dwelt in the Blue Mountains a great number of tiny +Many many years ago there dwelt in the Blue Mountains a great number of tiny silver fairies and golden goblins.
- +
-silver fairies and golden goblins+
- +
-They were all good fairies and happy goblins, for every day of their lives they basked and gambolled in the brilliam, sunlight, with never a care to worry them. Sometimes it rained, but, wonderful indeed, it rained only at night-time when every- +
- +
-one had grown tired of play and had drc,7..Tod off to sleep. None of the folk had +
- +
-seen the rain, and none really wished to stay up and see it, for fear that it would continue to rain after the sun had risen and so spoil their beautiful day, +
- +
-Now living with the goblins wc,s a sad yvong fellow name d Misty Nobody knew +
- +
-why he was called Misty, and only a ftw of the older goblins knew' where he uane fromG He was a strange fellow indeed, and often worried his friends by his apparent unhappiness. In the winter he would sometimes sit on a rock all day, gazing 1.700 at +
- +
-the crags and cliffs that reared up from the valley where he was living. Unhappy he was indeed, for how he yearned to be back amongst his mountain peaks in the Southern Alps I He dreamed, as he sat there with his sad face cupped in his chubby +
- +
-hands, of the happy days he had spent with his sister fairies on the snow peaks, riding on the backs of the great, hog-backed, black clouds that sailed around; and +
- +
-of how, in the summer, they would chase one another throufh the heath and the snow- daisies; and of the glittering stars that gleamed through the spectral snawgums on their evening games with the fireflies. Ohl would he never reach those heights above? Everybody was happy, thought Misty, except his poor self. +
- +
-One night, after such a day of sad pondering, Misty wandered away from the evening circle of games and found his way back to the rock where he was fond of sitting and dreaming. There he sat for hours, watching the stars above; dreaming +
- +
-of the stars of his homeland. Meanwhile the folk had wearied of their games and gone off to bed. Misty stayed for a long time, dreaming, and it was not until just before dawn that he lay down to sleep. Suddenly he awoke with a terrible start. +
- +
-It was raining; but, more terrible, it was daylight. Rain in the daytime That a horrible thought; but it was not a dream, or a thought, it was truel +
- +
-Poor Misty became very frightened, and raced as hard as he could back to the +
- +
-other goblins. Grouped around in little circles, they looked miserable and over- +
- +
-awed by this strange phenomenon Perhaps now, they said, it mould always rain in the daytime. Gone would be their happy days of playing. No more laughing and joking with the sun starts on the creeks and streamsZ No more hiding in the cc,rol fronds of the ferns g Everything mould become wet, and dank, and soaden Is it any wonder that they were all sad? No sun; 1Nhy, they would all dies +
- +
-Misty felt very bad about it all, because he realised that he must have been the cause of it all staying up so late He dared not tell his friends, but he made a vow that he mould bring them a greater happiness, and restore the sunshine, +
- +
-and so dispel all their sadness, So he made this suggestion:​ +
- +
-He Was to watch each day, and ,JaIn i-15 first sunbeam that peeped throush the heavy c]Asuds, then, however slender it might bes he would race up as fast as he could, and mount the ugly clouds, He waald first of all enlist the aid of the gnomes (nasty little people; nevertheless:​ th;8 was a common cause of preservation and all pettiness must be thrust aside), and., aided by these nimble-footed creatures, he mould beat down the clouds to earth; dama into the valley, where no minds could +
- +
-lift them and drive them up agaLn to 3ause more rain. Everybody would get a fear- +
- +
-ful wetting when the cloud burst, but what fun, they said, if Misty could beat those +
- +
-horrid clouds, and let in thej...c nshine againl +
- +
-Only for 0114 day did Misty and the gnomes have to wait, then, just before midday, the sun peeped through, trying to comfort the sad little folk. Calling out +
- +
-h.; +
- +
-to the gnomes, who vmre readyi quick as a firefly Misty raced up the sunbeam, with +
- +
-the gnomes at his heels. High up along the sunbeam they went until they were above the cloud mass. Jumping off, they flayed into their roe with frenzied energy, for they must win to preserve their very lives. There were countless numbers of gnomes, +
- +
-each contorted like a little devil, and howling with rage, hoping thus to scare the ugly clouds.+
  
-Gradually their weight cf numbers begsn to tell, and the cloud started ​to break upLower and lower 1.-k; E:4!k into the valley until only wisps as thin as Vapour floated down. The san gleamed on the valley once more as brilliantly as ever andlong before Misty and the gnomes reached the othersthey could hear+They were all good fairies and happy goblinsfor every day of their lives they basked ​and gambolled in the brilliant sunlight, with never a care to worry themSometimes it rained, but, wonderful indeed, it rained only at night-time when everyone had grown tired of play and had dropped off to sleepNone of the folk had ever seen the rain, and none really wished to stay up and see itfor fear that it would continue to rain after the sun had risen and so spoil their beautiful day.
  
-their ringing cries of joyGnomes ​and goblins, ​traditional enemiesjoined ​hands+Now, living with the goblins was a sad young fellow named MistyNobody knew why he was called Misty, ​and only a few of the older goblins ​knew where he came from. He was a strange fellow indeedand often worried his friends by his apparent unhappiness. In the winter he would sometimes sit on a rock all daygazing up at the crags and cliffs that reared up from the valley where he was living. Unhappy he was indeed, for how he yearned to be back amongst his mountain peaks in the Southern Alps! He dreamed, as he sat there with his sad face cupped in his chubby ​hands, of the happy days he had spent with his sister fairies on the snow peaks, riding on the backs of the great, hog-backed, black clouds that sailed around; and of how, in the summer, they would chase one another through the heath and the snow-daisies;​ and of the glittering stars that gleamed through the spectral snowgums on their evening games with the fireflies. Oh! would he never reach those heights above? Everybody was happy, thought Misty, except his poor self.
  
-with the fairies, and cheered each other because ​of their good fortuneThat evening ​was a memorable one in the valleyEverybody ​was happy once more.+One nightafter such a day of sad pondering, Misty wandered away from the evening circle of games and found his way back to the rock where he was fond of sitting and dreaming. There he sat for hours, watching the stars above; dreaming of the stars of his homeland. Meanwhile the folk had wearied ​of their games and gone off to bed. Misty stayed for a long timedreaming, and it was not until just before dawn that he lay down to sleep. Suddenly he awoke with terrible startIt was raining; but, more terrible, it was daylightRain in the daytime! What a horrible thought; but it was not a dream, or a thought, it was true!
  
-"What would the morrow-bring?",​ thought ​Misty, ​always ​the ponderer; "some new, strange phenomenon ​and more morriese perhaps." He had forgotten for the time being his memories ​of childhood, ​and soon fell asleep ​with the others.+Poor Misty became very frightenedand raced as hard as he could back to the other goblins. Grouped around in little circlesthey looked miserable and overawed by this strange phenomenon. ​Perhaps now, they said, it would always rain in the daytime. Gone would be their happy days of playing. No more laughing ​and joking ​with the sun-starts on the creeks and streams! No more hiding in the cool fronds of the ferns! Everything would become wet, and dank, and soddenIs it any wonder that they were all sad? No sun! Why, they would all die!
  
-Next morning at sunrise ​Misty was up first. He found everything met and sparkling with raindrops. Trues it had rained in t:le nights just as usual. What would the day bring? He Zoolcad up to the heavens with the keen aye of a weather prophet.+Misty felt very bad about it all, because he realised that he must have been the cause of it all staying ​up so late. He dared not tell his friends, but he made a vow that he would bring them a greater happiness, and restore ​the sunshine, and so dispel all their sadnessSo he made this suggestion:
  
-What was this he spied? Whys all about in the valley were things like clouds.+He was to watch each day, and wait for the first sunbeam that peeped throush the heavy clouds, then, however slender it might be, he would race up as fast as he could, and mount the ugly clouds. He would first of all enlist the aid of the gnomes (nasty little people; nevertheless,​ this was a common cause of preservation and all pettiness must be thrust aside), and, aided by these nimble-footed creatures, he would beat down the clouds ​to earth; down into the valley, where no winds could lift them and drive them up again to cause more rainEverybody would get a fearful wetting when the cloud burst, but what fun, they said, if Misty could beat those horrid clouds, and let in the sunshine again!
  
-Oolds chill fear gripped poor Misty. ​Would these ugly clouds ​never go? Yet, these+Only for one day did Misty and the gnomes have to wait, then, just before midday, the sun peeped through, trying to comfort the sad little folkCalling out to the gnomes, who were ready, quick as a firefly Misty raced up the sunbeam, with the gnomes at his heels. High up along the sunbeam they went until they were above the cloud mass. Jumping off, they flayed into their foe with frenzied energy, for they must win to preserve their very lives. There were countless numbers of gnomes, each contorted like a little devil, and howling with rage, hoping thus to scare the ugly clouds.
  
-were somehow different, They seemed fniendly avid clean, and how white they versa But they seemed ​to be all movingYesl they were moving together to form a mass to block out the sun again! He must call the gnomes ​and do somethingl Ohwhat could he do?+Gradually their weight of numbers begsn to tell, and the cloud started ​to break upLower and lower it sank into the valley until only wisps as thin as vapour floated down. The sun gleamed on the valley once more as brilliantly as ever and, long before Misty and the gnomes reached the others, they could hear their ringing cries of joy. Gnomes and goblins, traditional enemies, joined hands with the fairies, and cheered each other because of their good fortune. That evening was a memorable one in the valley. Everybody was happy once more.
  
-Waitl They were not joining upthey se....ned to be just drifting aimlesslyas if they were blindandgradually they went higher and higher. Misty, ​for a moment, forgot ​his troubles, and. yearned to be on the backs of those free, graceful+"What would the morrow bring?",​ thought Misty, always the ponderer"some newstrange phenomenon and more worriesperhaps." He had forgotten ​for the time being his memories of childhood, and soon fell asleep with the others.
  
-thingsThen, sudden:Vs he remembered how he got WI nameMist S1 Yesthat's+Next morning at sunrise Misty was up firstHe found everything wet and sparkling with raindropsTrueit had rained in the night, just as usual. What would the day bring? He looked up to the heavens with the keen eye of a weather prophet.
  
-what they wrel Misty; of courseNow it all came back to him haw he used to love sporting on the backs of the mist clouds when he was a little fallow in the+What was this he spied? Why, all about in the valley were things like clouds. Cold, chill fear gripped poor Misty. ​Would these ugly clouds never go? Yet, these were somehow different. They seemed friendly and clean, and how white they were! But they seemed to be all moving. Yes! they were moving together ​to form a mass to block out the sun again! He must call the gnomes and do something! Oh, what could he do?
  
-snow- mountains; dashing up the sunbeams ​ad leaping onto the soft, woolly backs of the mist clouds. Why, he mould try it' nowl+Wait! They were not joining up; they seemed to be just drifting aimlessly, as if they were blind, and gradually they went higher and higher. Misty, for a moment, forgot his troubles, and yearned to be on the backs of those free, graceful things. Then, suddenly, he remembered how he got his name. Mists! Yes, that's what they were! Misty; of course. Now it all came back to him how he used to love sporting on the backs of the mist clouds when he was a little fellow in the snow mountains; dashing up the sunbeams ​and leaping onto the soft, woolly backs of the mist clouds. Why, he would try it now!
  
-Calling out to his sleeping ​cenpanions ​to join him, he raced up the-nediVA ​sunbeam, and, in thil twinkling of an eye, was an the back of a mist cima%+Calling out to his sleeping ​companions ​to join him, he raced up the nearest ​sunbeam, and, in the twinkling of an eye, was an the back of a mist cloud.
  
-Soon the others caught the idea and were astride the carefree,: mktotiblkie rtiat clouds, sailing along in great majeeiy; and so they learned ​fromilaskyltowit% *tAi the backs of the mists. (turn to page 81)+Soon the others caught the idea and were astride the carefree, ​stately mist clouds, sailing along in great majesty; and so they learned ​from Misty how to ride the backs of the mists. (turn to page 8.)
  
  
193806.txt · Last modified: 2015/11/23 00:41 by elddawt