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193803 [2015/11/04 07:22]
thuy14 [WALKING IN THE NEW FOREST]
193803 [2015/11/20 07:43] (current)
thuy14 [NEWS FROM HERE THERE AND EVERYWHERE]
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 |Growing Up with Swag and Billy, by Judex|Page 2| |Growing Up with Swag and Billy, by Judex|Page 2|
 |Walking in the New Forest, by Doreen Helmrich|Page 3| |Walking in the New Forest, by Doreen Helmrich|Page 3|
-|Luck 0' the Woods (A Fantasy)|Page 4|+|Luck O' the Woods (A Fantasy)|Page 4|
 |Nioka, by Flo Allsworth|Page 5| |Nioka, by Flo Allsworth|Page 5|
 |"​Paddy"​|Page 6| |"​Paddy"​|Page 6|
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-LUCK 0' ​TEE WOODS ( A FANTASY). +===== LUCK O' ​THE WOODS (A FANTASY) ​===== 
-There was a man who slaw a tree, + 
-Not for his needs, but wantonly; +There was a man who slew a tree,\\ 
-Not that he needed beam for &​welling) ​Nor grass for kine, nor log for selling, +Not for his needs, but wantonly;\\ 
-Nor bridge to span a chasm oter+Not that he needed beam for dwelling,​\\ 
-Nor fire for hearth, nor plank for floor Not '​or ​just reasons like to these, But only that he hated trees. +Nor grass for kine, nor log for selling,\\ 
-Therefore the dryads came in tears. And little gods with pointed ears, +Nor bridge to span a chasm o'er,\\ 
-And small, plump beasts, all bounce and fus Furry and sonewhat ​fabulous, +Nor fire for hearth, nor plank for floor -\\ 
-And exiled birds with broken cries, And small slim elves with starry eyes. They did not curse him - no, not they, Only they took his luck away. +Not for just reasons like to these,\\ 
-Dire danger came not to his side, +But only that he hated trees.\\ 
-But all his joy in mall things died. + 
-He heard strange ​muttrings ​in the rain, And doors he shut swung wide again, And gear he hoarded went to rot, And spring came and he noticed not. No blossom throve beside his door; The zest that he had knownbefore - Zest of the hungry man at bread, +Therefore the dryads came in tears.\\  
-Zest of the weary man for bed, +And little gods with pointed ears,\\ 
-Zest of the thirsty for clear springs, The morning heart that thoughtless +And small, plump beasts, all bounce and fuss\\  
-sings, Left him, and friendship'​s fount +Furry and somewhat ​fabulous,\\ 
-was dried. +And exiled birds with broken cries,\\ 
-- +And small slim elves with starry eyes.\\ 
-Only a dog kept by his side - +They did not curse him - no, not they,\\ 
-An old dog, grey and tried and wise, With trouble in his dimming eyes, Who wondered, groping in his mind, +Only they took his luck away. 
-s'How man - so wise - could be so blind: + 
-To hoard his money, count his gear, +Dire danger came not to his side,\\ 
-Check off each day, and tell each year, +But all his joy in small things died.\\ 
-And devious long reckonings cast,+He heard strange ​mutterings ​in the rain,\\ 
 +And doors he shut swung wide again,\\ 
 +And gear he hoarded went to rot,\\ 
 +And spring came and he noticed not.\\ 
 +No blossom throve beside his door;\\ 
 +The zest that he had known before -\\ 
 +Zest of the hungry man at bread,\\ 
 +Zest of the weary man for bed,\\ 
 +Zest of the thirsty for clear springs,\\  
 +The morning heart that thoughtless sings,\\ 
 +Left him, and friendship'​s fount was dried. 
 + 
 +Only a dog kept by his side -\\ 
 +An old dog, grey and tried and wise,\\ 
 +With trouble in his dimming eyes,\\ 
 +Who wondered, groping in his mind,\\ 
 +How man - so wise - could be so blind:\\ 
 +To hoard his money, count his gear,\\ 
 +Check off each day, and tell each year,\\ 
 +And devious long reckonings cast,\\
 Yet not to know his luck had passed. Yet not to know his luck had passed.
-Up in the woods were scented ​flowtrs, That waited for the moth-winged hours, And honeyed cups for bees at morn + 
 +Up in the woods were scented ​flow'​rs,\\ 
 +That waited for the moth-winged hours,\\ 
 +And honeyed cups for bees at morn\\
 Love wrought and little trees were born. Love wrought and little trees were born.
-In all these things he had no part - A shadow with a withered heart, + 
-and dry, passed him by. +In all these things he had no part -\\ 
-1931. +A shadow with a withered heart,\\ 
-A husk so empty, shrunk That Death, the reaper, +A husk so empty, shrunk ​and dry\\ 
-- Ella McFadyenPublished in the "​Sydney Morning Herald"​ Centenary Issue, 18thApril, +That Death, the reaper, ​passed him by. 
-17.1ris:ao + 
-earee...m. +- Ella McFadyen 
-Flo Allsworth. + 
-The very name spells charm, and it he s charm - the charm of the Trimbles. About +Published in the "​Sydney Morning Herald"​ Centenary Issue, 18th April, ​1931 
-thirty of us were invited for the wee1c-en(1 ​Jean arranged with the busman ​to drive + 
-us to the farm and we being keen advecates ​of the walking cult were jubilant at having + 
-to do nary a step of walking. I arrived with about a dozen othors ​on the first bus. +===== NIOKA ===== 
-We were welcomed at the gate by Jean and hor Motl..er ​and a few of the superior of our clan who go places in cars. We had picked our ca2,​2sites ​on the sefteet ​spots of grass + 
-in the back yard and had had refreshments ​-Weer -Lhe second bus are7red. We all joined Mrs. Trimble at the gate to welcome the new co=e, lhey had refrue3eaents, picked out the remaining good spots for their tents, and after that we weeeiered ​round the poultry yards and caw paddock, picked out a hill to clifib ​on the morrow, peeled dozens of spuds and shelled innumerable peas, then Morrie ​predoed ​ciaoit ​and some one else a ball and we played games. The dogs thought the ball go wzes eut on for their especial ​benefit and ran themselves almost thin trying to gek, a tooth into the ball, but the ball throwers were "​Olympic standard"​ so the poor dogs didntt ​get a look in. +By Flo Allsworth 
-After our round of games we were ready to live up to the S.B.W. reputation and We certainly did justice to the dinner that was set before us. It is no small task + 
-to feed gach a large party of E.P.els and we havon:t ceased to wonder at Mrs.Trimble'​s wonderful ability. The lads of the party also shuged ​their ability - they had the washing ​1l1 done in a thriee+The very name spells charm, and it has charm - the charm of the Trimbles. About thirty of us were invited for the weekend, ​Jean arranged with the bus man to drive us to the farm and we being keen advocates ​of the walking cult were jubilant at having to do nary a step of walking. I arrived with about a dozen others ​on the first bus. 
-Saturday night was of course sing-song night in fact it was a concert. Ray Bean +We were welcomed at the gate by Jean and her Mother ​and a few of the superior of our clan who go places in cars. We had picked our campsites ​on the softest ​spots of grass in the back yard and had had refreshments ​when the second bus arrived. We all joined Mrs. Trimble at the gate to welcome the new campers. They had refreshments, picked out the remaining good spots for their tents, and after that we wandered ​round the poultry yards and cow paddock, picked out a hill to climb on the morrow, peeled dozens of spuds and shelled innumerable peas, then Morrie ​produced ​quoit and some one else a ball and we played games. The dogs thought the ball game was put on for their special ​benefit and ran themselves almost thin trying to get a tooth into the ball, but the ball throwers were "​Olympic standard"​ so the poor dogs didn'​t ​get a look in. 
-played "The Anvil Chorus"​ as an everturet, ​Alone he did it with the help of a mouth + 
-organ and Mr. Trimble:werb the ortii and louder the anvil or was it +After our round of games we were ready to live up to the S.B.W. reputation and we certainly did justice to the dinner that was set before us. It is no small task to feed such a large party of S.B.W'​s ​and we haven't ceased to wonder at Mrs. Trimble'​s wonderful ability. The lads of the party also showed ​their ability - they had the washing ​up done in a thrice. 
-the hammer, and louder still tle corrugated ​ircn, anyway the effect was alright and caused much laughter. After the overture ​Reno pleyed ​the piano and Mr. Trimble sang, then we had choruses doing full justice to the Bush Walking songs. Joan sang and recited the fairy piece ch CUd.Yer ​the concert. ​!Tvius ​the first time I had heard + 
-this piece and it certainly ​seuna:​d ​charming. ​Ion also sang and recited and Jock gave us "​Dangerous Dan Mo rTrew" and so the night wt:​cli; ​on with plenty of singing till the witching hour and then we All erept off to oar tentso +Saturday night was of course sing-song night in fact it was a concert. Ray Bean played "The Anvil Chorus"​ as an overture. ​Alone he did it with the help of a mouth organ and Mr. Trimble'forge - loudly went the organ and louder the anvil or was it the hammer, and louder still the corrugated ​iron, anyway the effect was alright and caused much laughter. After the overture, Rene played ​the piano and Mr. Trimble sang, then we had choruses doing full justice to the Bush Walking songs. Joan sang and recited the fairy piece she did for the concert. ​'​Twas ​the first time I had heard this piece and it certainly ​sounded ​charming. ​Ian also sang and recited and Jock gave us "​Dangerous Dan McGrow" and so the night went on with plenty of singing till the witching hour and then we all crept off to our tents. 
-Sunday morn we were up betigLes ​and after breakfast some of us strolled down the + 
-road. Some found a nice sunny spot and read books others ​inepected ​Mr. Trimblets +Sunday morn we were up betimes ​and after breakfast some of us strolled down the road. Some found a nice sunny spot and read booksothers ​inspected ​Mr. Trimble'​s ​workshop, others played games while those athirst for adventure went on a rat hunt. This is considered an exciting sport for the uninitiated, ​I had better give an outline: 
-workshop, others played games while those athirst for adventure went on a rat hunt. This is considered an exciting sport for the Lnin-1.tiated ​I had hotter gi ve an outline: +First of allone must have a poultry farmthe more fowls the better ​- they make most of the din; then some dogs and good strong waddles and a few picks and shovels, let the dogs into the fowl houses ​and watch the feathers fly. After the dogs have scared most of the wits out of the fowls and they have cleared out of the houses, nose around and see if there are any likely holes then start the pick and shovel work, soon the dogs will start in to dig. Then of course the rats should ​come out and all those armed with waddles give chase. I was in a nice sunny corner of the garden reading "Man Shy", when I heard a terrific ​din and thinking something ​must have happened hastened fowlyard-wards only to see the whole contingent ​leaving, they had only 
-First of all one must have a poultry farm the more fowls the bettor ​- they make most of the din; then some dogs and good strong waddles and a few oieke and shovels, let +caught one and 2 half rats, that was their story, a poor catch, so were seeking permission to do a little ​more hunting in the next farm, permission granted. I went to look on and I saw the whole process except the ratsIt seems the depression has taken its toll on the rats as well as on us. In the peak period I believe there were dozens and a rat hunt was worth while. However I will leave it to the tuffer members. ​I'​d ​rather read
-the dogs into the fowl houses ​seed watch the feathers fly. A_fter ​the dogs have scared ​ + 
-most of the wits out of the fowls and they have cleared out of the houses, nose around and see if there are any likely holes then start the pick and shovel work, soon the dogs will start in to dig. Then of course the re:co elesead ​come out and all those +After lunchMorrie decided to uphold the prestige of the Club by taking us to the hill. There were thirty members when the intention was announced ​and three went a walking. We left via the cow paddock ​climbed ​about a dozen fences and came to ?road crossed that and ? creek then over more fences ​and eventually we came to the water 
-armed with waddles give chase. I was in a nice sunny corner of iho garden reading "Man Shy", when I heard a terrific ​0:,n and thinkil eee,​othne ​must have happened +canal. Climbed the hill along side the canal and were rewarded with one of the most expansive views it would be possible to got around Sydney. Right at our feet was Prospect Dam and a little to the left was Sydney, the Bridge towering over the North Shore area. Morrie picked out quite a lot of landmarks for us in the different suburbs then we looked in the opposite direction and picked out Mounts King George and Hay and further south Colong. It was a beautifully clear afternoon the hill has about 100 trees on it so we have named it 100 Tree Hill - very original. After taking the view in we returned, this time via the road and got back just in time for tea. The non walkers hadn't lazed altogether; some of them had played tennis. 
-hastened fowlyard-warde e2;e t ee'e 'Jhe 7rvhole ​contingent ​leavin7), they had only +
-caught one and 2 half raL-e that was their story, a poor catch, so were +
-seeking permission to ('​.o ​more hunting in the next farm, permission granted.,. +
-I went to look on and I saw tie whole process except the ratsIt seems the depression has taken its toll on the rats as well as on us. In the peak period I believe there were dozens and a rat hunt was worth while. However I will leave it to the tuffer members. ​ltd. rather read, +
-After lunch Morrie decided to uphold the prestige of the Club by taking us to the hill. There were thirty members when the intention was aanounced ​and three went a +
-walking. We left via the caw paddock ​olimbcd ​about a dozen fences and came to ? road crossed that and ? creek then over more fo=es and eventually we came to the water +
-canal. Climbed the hill along side the canal and were rewarded with one of the most expansive views it would be possible to got around Sydney. Right at our feet was Prospect Dam and a little to the left was Sydney, the Bridge towering over the North Shore area. Morrie picked out quite a lot of landmarks for us in the different suburbs then we looked in the opposite direction and picked out Mounts King George and Hay and further south Colong. It was a beautifully clear afternoon the hill has about 100 trees on it so we have named it 100 Tree Hill - very or:Lginal. After taking the view in we returned, this time via the road and got back just in time for tea. The non walkers hadn't lazed altogether; some of them had played tennis.+
 After tea we had another sing-song until the bus called for us, then we sang very heartily, "For They are Jolly Good Fellows",​ and said good bye to "​Nioka"​ all hoping Jean's family will let us come again sometime. After tea we had another sing-song until the bus called for us, then we sang very heartily, "For They are Jolly Good Fellows",​ and said good bye to "​Nioka"​ all hoping Jean's family will let us come again sometime.
-TEE STORY OF TEE FRIEZE + 
-Now in the City of Sydney in the land of Aus there lived a man named Jack the + 
-son of John and he was a scribe. And as he worked diligently at his desk he heard +===== THE STORY OF THE FRIEZE ​===== 
-a voice which said unto him: "Jock thou son of John" , and he lifted his head and turned himself about but he saw no man save his brother scribes who were bent over their tasks. And he said unto himself: "Lo some foolish person joketh, yea cloth he think to pull my leg." But even as he thus spake, he again heard the voice + 
-saying: "​River ​flaws, Bush gro, Wind blows."​ +Now in the City of Sydney in the land of Austhere lived a man named Jackthe son of John and he was a scribe. And as he worked diligently at his desk he heard a voice which said unto him: "Jack thou son of John", and he lifted his head and turned himself about but he saw no man save his brother scribes who were bent over their tasks. And he said unto himself: "Lo some foolish person joketh, yea doth he think to pull my leg." But even as he thus spake, he again heard the voice 
-And Jack the son of J01'.n eg'​reA. ​prodigiously and resumed his labours, until his appointed hours of lelour wre don. Then returned he to his dwelling place and fed. +saying: "​River ​flows, Bush grows, Wind blows."​ 
-Having thus refreshed ​]-e_r:Iscif, he sat in a comfortable place and mused within himself on the strange voice he lu..d heard. And lo he saw a vision of men doing splendid things. Yea men :i,y1 tieLy ships sailing on unchartered seas and men exploring the frozen wastes at the Ilieemost ​ends sf the earth.+ 
 +And Jack the son of John sighed ​prodigiously and resumed his labours, until his appointed hours of labour were done. Then returned he to his dwelling place and fed.  
 + 
 +Having thus refreshed ​himself, he sat in a comfortable place and mused within himself on the strange voice he had heard. And lo he saw a vision of men doing splendid things. Yea men in tiny ships sailing on unchartered seas and men exploring the frozen wastes at the uttermost ​ends of the earth. 
 And he said, "Lo these are men", and his soul yearned within him: "Oh that I could do as these men do." And he said, "Lo these are men", and his soul yearned within him: "Oh that I could do as these men do."
-Then he heard a voice swing: "Theu fool hast thou not thy mother and thy + 
-sister to keep, haw is it posrenle ​for thee to ven.{mre ​then into the wilderness?"​ +Then he heard a voice saying: "Thou fool hast thou not thy mother and thy sister to keep, how is it possible ​for thee to venture ​then into the wilderness?"​ 
-And he said: "​Alas ​vozilyS ​Thou sayest ​soothe+ 
-This thrilling story will be continued in our next issue. If you can't wait +And he said: "​Alas ​varily! ​Thou sayest ​sooth." 
-came and have a look at the Frieze in Faddy:s place and read the story for yourself. + 
-PALLIY+This thrilling story will be continued in our next issue. If you can't wait, come and have a look at the Frieze in Faddy's place and read the story for yourself. 
-Camp Gear for 'Walkers, + 
-022111 +F.A. PALLIN,\\ 
-327 George St., Sydney.+Camp Gear for Walkers,\\ 
 +327 George St., Sydney.\\
 Opp. Palings. Opp. Palings.
-NEWS FROM HERE THERE AND EVERTVHERE + 
-Preserving ​Th:figs +===== NEWS FROM HERE THERE AND EVERYWHERE ===== 
-The Wild Life Preservation Society acts as a watch-dog for the State, ever on the look-out to prevent destruction of native flora and fauna, and the work it does for us + 
-is beyond praise. This year it has widened ​ibs activities and purchased a piece of land at Avalon ​aS a fauna and flora reserve; it hopes by this means to educate public opinion in the appreciation of wild life. If you are ever that way you should inspect +**Preserving ​Our Wild Things** 
-the reserve and see the giant angophora in the middle of it. + 
-Mountaineering in New Zealand+The Wild Life Preservation Society acts as a watch-dog for the State, ever on the look-out to prevent destruction of native flora and fauna, and the work it does for us is beyond praise. This year it has widened ​its activities and purchased a piece of land at Avalon ​as a fauna and flora reserve; it hopes by this means to educate public opinion in the appreciation of wild life. If you are ever that way you should inspect the reserve and see the giant angophora in the middle of it. 
 + 
 +**Mountaineering in New Zealand** 
 A crop of newspaper cuttings brings vividly before one the keen interest taken by the N.Z. public in mountaineering and the consequent prestige and influence of the mountaineering clubs. Will bushwalking ever have the same prestige in N.S.W.? A crop of newspaper cuttings brings vividly before one the keen interest taken by the N.Z. public in mountaineering and the consequent prestige and influence of the mountaineering clubs. Will bushwalking ever have the same prestige in N.S.W.?
-Our own party'​s exploits do not figure in these cuttings, although they have 
-climbed seven peaks in wonderful weather. The most spectacular feat recorded is that 
-of Marjorie Edgar Jones who made the second ascent of Dampier and climbed a couple of other major peaks on the way back. It was a long and arduous climb, the party being 
-on the go for 32 hours. Marjorie'​s is the second ascent; the first was made by a Sydney girl, Freda Du Faur, 24 years ago, and her account of it may be read in "The Conquest of Mount Cook" which is in our library. 
-Fatal Accident in the Tararua Tramping Club 
  
-January'​s issue of "The Tararua Tramper"​ tells the tragic story of haw Norm Dowling was killed on Mount Evans. It happened at the end of a long and successful climb when they were nearly back at camp. He was leading, slipped and fell headlong +Our own party'​s exploits do not figure in these cuttings, although they have climbed seven peaks in wonderful weather. The most spectacular feat recorded is that of Marjorie Edgar Jones who made the second ascent of Dampier and climbed a couple of other major peaks on the way back. It was a long and arduous climb, the party being on the go for 32 hours. Marjorie'​s is the second ascent; the first was made by a Sydney girl, Freda Du Faur, 24 years ago, and her account of it may be read in "The Conquest of Mount Cook" which is in our library. 
-dragging the others with him3 They crashed on to a rocky shelf and then on to a snow-slope. It was a fall of 500 feet and the marvel is not that the leader was + 
-killed, but that the other two survived. We extend our sincere sympathy to our friends of the Tararuas on the lose of one of their ablest members. +**Fatal Accident in the Tararua Tramping Club** 
-Londoners Protect their Open Spaces + 
-The movement for the preservation of the wild lands seems to be spreading everywhere. Our friends, the So-Pats(Southern Pathfinders) devote a very large part of their Annual Report to this subject and it is interesting to see that their work does not stop at propaganda, as with us, but extends to collecting substantial sums of +January'​s issue of "The Tararua Tramper"​ tells the tragic story of haw Norm Dowling was killed on Mount Evans. It happened at the end of a long and successful climb when they were nearly back at camp. He was leading, slipped and fell headlong dragging the others with him. They crashed on to a rocky shelf and then on to a snow-slope. It was a fall of 500 feet and the marvel is not that the leader was 
-money. Their report is accompanied by a friendly letter telling among other things of the, TD1?-1r,,r ",r1a curtrv ​inn Md-r-elc,d n-re miap tramp: +killed, but that the other two survived. We extend our sincere sympathy to our friends of the Tararuas on the loss of one of their ablest members. 
-Walking Club in Western Australia + 
-Victoria, N.S.W. ​Rnr3. Tasmnia7C'?​171 ​to /:CW'S 1-Id a monopoly of walking activities, but uP that n. akigc2.,1 bc.; fc in Australln, started by a member of the Melbourne ​Nomen/s Walking Club. +**Londoners Protect their Open Spaces** 
-We have been pleased to welcome to Sydney and to our walks Miss Eileen Bass of the Tararua Tramping Club. She was introduced by Mr. Jock Macpherson whom some of /IR mat milen he '​TAMA ​in Svanev ROTIle ​time avn- + 
-NEAT SHALL WE IN) WITH TEE POLE-CUTTERS?​+The movement for the preservation of the wild lands seems to be spreading everywhere. Our friends, the So-Pats (Southern Pathfinders) devote a very large part of their Annual Report to this subject and it is interesting to see that their work does not stop at propaganda, as with us, but extends to collecting substantial sums of money. Their report is accompanied by a friendly letter telling among other things of their Christmas Dinner which is held in a country ​inn and prevailed by a five mile tramp
 + 
 + 
 +**Walking Club in Western Australia** 
 + 
 +Victoria, N.S.W. ​and Tasmania seem to have had a monopoly of walking activities, but we hear that a walking club has at length been founded ​in Western Australia, started by a member of the Melbourne ​Women's Walking Club. 
 + 
 +**Visitor** 
 + 
 +We have been pleased to welcome to Sydney and to our walks Miss Eileen Bass of the Tararua Tramping Club. She was introduced by Mr. Jock Macpherson whom some of us met when he was in Svdnev some time ago.  
 + 
 +**WHAT ​SHALL WE DO WITH THE POLE-CUTTERS?​ 
 By Dorothy Lawry. By Dorothy Lawry.
-Man is the most destructive of all animals. Of course, he is also the most + 
-constructive,​ but we do not want artificial rockeries, or concrete promenades, in +Man is the most destructive of all animals. Of course, he is also the most constructive,​ but we do not want artificial rockeries, or concrete promenades, in the bush
-the bush:+
 Most of the destruction of our heritage is so obvious, and rouses such righteous indignation in the breasts of all nabure-lovers,​ that the details hardly need stressing here - deliberate firing of the bush by graziers; cutting of living trees by Most of the destruction of our heritage is so obvious, and rouses such righteous indignation in the breasts of all nabure-lovers,​ that the details hardly need stressing here - deliberate firing of the bush by graziers; cutting of living trees by
 ' vandals and thoughtless youngsters just for the joy of it; shooting of helpless birds ' vandals and thoughtless youngsters just for the joy of it; shooting of helpless birds
193803.1446621777.txt.gz · Last modified: 2015/11/04 07:22 by thuy14