User Tools

Site Tools


193605

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
193605 [2015/11/30 01:20]
sbw [Beware of Shi-ing]
193605 [2015/11/30 01:26] (current)
sbw [See Tasmania For Two Shillings]
Line 293: Line 293:
 ===== See Tasmania For Two Shillings ===== ===== See Tasmania For Two Shillings =====
  
-Dot English. +Dot English ​[Dot Butler] 
-" + 
-In a weak moment I happened to mention to our newly-appointed Editress, Miss Hyles (( [sic] "Byles")), that I had just completed a 400-mile bicycle tour of Tasmania of a fortnight'​s duration, and had only spent two shillings for food on the trip. Immediately she pounced on me and demanded an account of my jaunt for the next "​Bushwalker",​ under the heading of "See Tasmania for Two Shillings," ​(( [sic] )) Well, what could I do but obey? Accordingly,​ I submit for your delight my potted tale; but it is not true to lable, for I have not included two shillings spent for accommodation at a guest house on the one wet night of the trip, nor have I counted the cost of the food I took with me from home, namely, 1 lb. butter, 1 lb. dates and sultanas and half a loaf of bread. It pains my sense of rectitude to have to mention, also, that I came by a box of fruit on the boat, all of which would have added somewhat to my expenses had I paid for them myself. However, our Marie, being a lawyer, is also sufficient of a psychologist to know that once you get your public interested, by means of a provocative heading, they will generally finish reading the article, so now that I know I've an audience I will continue my tale.+In a weak moment I happened to mention to our newly-appointed Editress, Miss Byles, that I had just completed a 400-mile bicycle tour of Tasmania of a fortnight'​s duration, and had only spent two shillings for food on the trip. Immediately she pounced on me and demanded an account of my jaunt for the next "​Bushwalker",​ under the heading of "See Tasmania for Two Shillings." ​ Well, what could I do but obey? Accordingly,​ I submit for your delight my potted tale; but it is not true to label, for I have not included two shillings spent for accommodation at a guest house on the one wet night of the trip, nor have I counted the cost of the food I took with me from home, namely, 1 lb. butter, 1 lb. dates and sultanas and half a loaf of bread. It pains my sense of rectitude to have to mention, also, that I came by a box of fruit on the boat, all of which would have added somewhat to my expenses had I paid for them myself. However, our Marie, being a lawyer, is also sufficient of a psychologist to know that once you get your public interested, by means of a provocative heading, they will generally finish reading the article, so now that I know I've an audience I will continue my tale.
  
 I am not going to burden you with a detailed day-to-day itinerary. I would have to spend hours pouring over a map to do this, and so would you, and I know you are just as lazy as I am. I shall, instead, tell you the interesting bits which stand out in my memory, and what I have forgotten is obviously not worthy of remembrance. I am not going to burden you with a detailed day-to-day itinerary. I would have to spend hours pouring over a map to do this, and so would you, and I know you are just as lazy as I am. I shall, instead, tell you the interesting bits which stand out in my memory, and what I have forgotten is obviously not worthy of remembrance.
Line 315: Line 315:
 "It would be if I didn't know about it," he replied, "But now that I know about it I wouldn'​t let you do it". "It would be if I didn't know about it," he replied, "But now that I know about it I wouldn'​t let you do it".
  
-So here was a deadlock. We both just looked at each other. Suddenly a whistle ​Kew. "​Closing-down time," muttered the official one. "​Look,"​ addressing me, "Shove that thing in that shed and we'll see about it in the morning,"​ - which I promptly wasted no time in doing.+So here was a deadlock. We both just looked at each other. Suddenly a whistle ​blew. "​Closing-down time," muttered the official one. "​Look,"​ addressing me, "Shove that thing in that shed and we'll see about it in the morning,"​ - which I promptly wasted no time in doing.
  
 The boat sailed the next evening at 6 o'​clock,​ and as I didn't arrive until ten minutes before she was due out, I had only time to ascertain that Lavinia had gone from the shed; and presumed she had been stowed below, which later proved to be correct. The boat sailed the next evening at 6 o'​clock,​ and as I didn't arrive until ten minutes before she was due out, I had only time to ascertain that Lavinia had gone from the shed; and presumed she had been stowed below, which later proved to be correct.
  
-A little lass who came racing up, all breathless, to wave me a fond farewell a few minutes before the boat drew out, brought as a parting gift a packet of dried fruits; but as she was not allowed on board she tied it to a streamer I held, and the whole concourse of people watched with bated breath while I carefully drew up the precious packet on its flimsy attachment. As I finally reached out and grakbed ​it a loud cheer rent the air, and the sigh of relief from several hundred throats caused many of the streamers to snap - or was it that the boat was moving out?+A little lass who came racing up, all breathless, to wave me a fond farewell a few minutes before the boat drew out, brought as a parting gift a packet of dried fruits; but as she was not allowed on board she tied it to a streamer I held, and the whole concourse of people watched with bated breath while I carefully drew up the precious packet on its flimsy attachment. As I finally reached out and grabbed ​it a loud cheer rent the air, and the sigh of relief from several hundred throats caused many of the streamers to snap - or was it that the boat was moving out?
  
 Soon the last streamer was snapped, the last eye piped, the last handkerchief waved, and the crowd on the wharf faded from sight and we were Southward bound. Soon the last streamer was snapped, the last eye piped, the last handkerchief waved, and the crowd on the wharf faded from sight and we were Southward bound.
Line 327: Line 327:
 For the next half-hour everyone was too preoccupied with food to be conversational. However, meal over, we all went on deck to become acquainted. For the next half-hour everyone was too preoccupied with food to be conversational. However, meal over, we all went on deck to become acquainted.
  
-While doing the rounds with others from our table, Fate saw fit to arrange a meeting between myself and an attractive young Danish lad. He had taken the trip to get away from women, and I ditto, ditto, ditto. ditto. to get away from men. As we had so much in common, we immediatelt (( [sic] immediately ​)) knew we were soul-mates, and spent the rest of the time together, - that is, except at meal times, for we had been placed at different tables and the Head Steward found he couldn'​t change our places, for reasons known only to himself, but nevertheless suspected by me; for later I saw him so pally with the youth in charge of the ladies'​ bathroom that you'd think they were brother and sister. Now there had arisen an insuperable barrier between this Knight of the Ladies'​ Bathroom and myself, as I shall hasten to explain:+While doing the rounds with others from our table, Fate saw fit to arrange a meeting between myself and an attractive young Danish lad. He had taken the trip to get away from women, and I ditto, ditto, ditto. ditto. to get away from men. As we had so much in common, we immediately knew we were soul-mates, and spent the rest of the time together, - that is, except at meal times, for we had been placed at different tables and the Head Steward found he couldn'​t change our places, for reasons known only to himself, but nevertheless suspected by me; for later I saw him so pally with the youth in charge of the ladies'​ bathroom that you'd think they were brother and sister. Now there had arisen an insuperable barrier between this Knight of the Ladies'​ Bathroom and myself, as I shall hasten to explain:
  
 Naturally, I was travelling light, so was unencumbered with kimino, topcoat, or the like. On the first morning, at the insistence of the second gong which was being violently clashed up and down the corridors, I fell out of my top bunk and made a hasty dash for the adjoining bathroom, draped in a ship's bed-spread. Naturally, I was travelling light, so was unencumbered with kimino, topcoat, or the like. On the first morning, at the insistence of the second gong which was being violently clashed up and down the corridors, I fell out of my top bunk and made a hasty dash for the adjoining bathroom, draped in a ship's bed-spread.
Line 375: Line 375:
 I swallowed this in good faith for the first two days; but my illusions gradually vanished as time went by and I realised that the good road, like the Fata Morgana, retreated always before me as I pursued it. However, I reconciled myself by remembering that I had a whole fortnight in which to cover the journey. The countryside was magnificant (( [sic] magnificent )), and certainly did not warrant one's passing hastily through it. I swallowed this in good faith for the first two days; but my illusions gradually vanished as time went by and I realised that the good road, like the Fata Morgana, retreated always before me as I pursued it. However, I reconciled myself by remembering that I had a whole fortnight in which to cover the journey. The countryside was magnificant (( [sic] magnificent )), and certainly did not warrant one's passing hastily through it.
  
-From Burnie for 25 miles the road follews ​the northern coast-line, giving one views of long stretches of blue ocean dotted with rugged, green-topped islets, and secluded little sandy beaches for swimming.+From Burnie for 25 miles the road follows ​the northern coast-line, giving one views of long stretches of blue ocean dotted with rugged, green-topped islets, and secluded little sandy beaches for swimming.
  
 From Devonport on the coast, the road runs inland through typical English countryside - golden fields surrounded by hawthorn hedges, each field holding a neat, well-made haystack; shapely English trees raising their stately heads and adding to the richness of the landscape; convict-built buildings, some in ruins and some as good as the day they wore constructed;​ heaped stone walls, also the work of convict labourers; and blackberries,​ blackberries,​ blackberries. Never before had I seen so many blackberries all at the one time. You could stand in one spot and fill a bucket without taking a step. It might be fair to the Main Roads Board of Tasmania (if any) to admit that my slow rate of progress was due as much to this overplus (( [sic] Dated synonym of surplus )) of berries as to the condition of the roads. My trail through the island was blazed by a track denuded of blackberries,​ just as though a grass-hopper plague had passed through. One might mention, also, that Tasmania is very richly supplied with orchards - a veritable Paradise to the vegetarian. Without stressing the obvious, it is easy to see how a vegetarian with broad vision could easily pass through at practically no expense to herself, moreover, without committing any petty theft. From Devonport on the coast, the road runs inland through typical English countryside - golden fields surrounded by hawthorn hedges, each field holding a neat, well-made haystack; shapely English trees raising their stately heads and adding to the richness of the landscape; convict-built buildings, some in ruins and some as good as the day they wore constructed;​ heaped stone walls, also the work of convict labourers; and blackberries,​ blackberries,​ blackberries. Never before had I seen so many blackberries all at the one time. You could stand in one spot and fill a bucket without taking a step. It might be fair to the Main Roads Board of Tasmania (if any) to admit that my slow rate of progress was due as much to this overplus (( [sic] Dated synonym of surplus )) of berries as to the condition of the roads. My trail through the island was blazed by a track denuded of blackberries,​ just as though a grass-hopper plague had passed through. One might mention, also, that Tasmania is very richly supplied with orchards - a veritable Paradise to the vegetarian. Without stressing the obvious, it is easy to see how a vegetarian with broad vision could easily pass through at practically no expense to herself, moreover, without committing any petty theft.
Line 383: Line 383:
 The road has been mounting steadily all day, and I've been doing a deal of walking up hills. In the early afternoon I struck a trail of tomatoes, apparently shed from a passing cart. I followed them' up hill for about half a mile, collecting the =squashed specimens in a sugar-bag I carried slung on the handlebars for just such scavenging purposes. Like the Man with the Muck Rake, my eyes were never raised above the ground, and my thoughts were following distinctly mundane channels, making laborious calculations as to the marketable value of my unexpected harvest if I swopped (( [sic] )) half of it at the next township for butter or tomatoes butter being worth about 2/- per lb. and tomatoes 2d. per lb. retail. The road has been mounting steadily all day, and I've been doing a deal of walking up hills. In the early afternoon I struck a trail of tomatoes, apparently shed from a passing cart. I followed them' up hill for about half a mile, collecting the =squashed specimens in a sugar-bag I carried slung on the handlebars for just such scavenging purposes. Like the Man with the Muck Rake, my eyes were never raised above the ground, and my thoughts were following distinctly mundane channels, making laborious calculations as to the marketable value of my unexpected harvest if I swopped (( [sic] )) half of it at the next township for butter or tomatoes butter being worth about 2/- per lb. and tomatoes 2d. per lb. retail.
  
-Being so preoccupied,​ I was entirely unprepared for the magnificant ​panorama which suddenly confronted me on topping the rise. About a mile below, the Tamar Valley stretched away into the far distance, with Launceston and its outlying suburbs dotted along its meandering banks like miniature dolls' houses.+Being so preoccupied,​ I was entirely unprepared for the magnificent ​panorama which suddenly confronted me on topping the rise. About a mile below, the Tamar Valley stretched away into the far distance, with Launceston and its outlying suburbs dotted along its meandering banks like miniature dolls' houses.
  
 As I stood propped against a post admiring the view, a youth emerged from a nearby store and approached me, wheeling a bike. He was clad in our regulation Bushwalker garb as far up as the neck; but there the similarity ceased, for his head was graced by an immaculate Bond Street model, its noble lines somewhat disfigured by a tattered fly-veil, for Tasmania was supposed to be suffering from a plague of flies. He was holidaying per bike, as I was. Being unwilling to put his hat in his pack, where it might be crushed, he had perforce to wear it. As I stood propped against a post admiring the view, a youth emerged from a nearby store and approached me, wheeling a bike. He was clad in our regulation Bushwalker garb as far up as the neck; but there the similarity ceased, for his head was graced by an immaculate Bond Street model, its noble lines somewhat disfigured by a tattered fly-veil, for Tasmania was supposed to be suffering from a plague of flies. He was holidaying per bike, as I was. Being unwilling to put his hat in his pack, where it might be crushed, he had perforce to wear it.
Line 403: Line 403:
 Miles out of Hobart I met a boy wheeling his bike along. It was the usual story - a puncture and no pump. I offered to race into the next town, about five miles away, and buy him a pump, but he said it wouldn'​t be fair to make me ride an extra ten miles when I had already come so far, and that the walk would do him good. I walked with him for about a mile and found him fine company. As he had already been walking for several hours before I met him, I made a secret resolve to speed ahead, and bring him back a pump after all, so waving a cheery farewell, departed. It was a very small town; but the local store was well-stocked and soon procured me a pump. I left my pack with the storekeeper and raced back to the lad. We had the puncture repaired in a few minutes; but then discovered that the front fork was practically broken through. It would have been dangerous to ride, so it had to be wheeled after all. Miles out of Hobart I met a boy wheeling his bike along. It was the usual story - a puncture and no pump. I offered to race into the next town, about five miles away, and buy him a pump, but he said it wouldn'​t be fair to make me ride an extra ten miles when I had already come so far, and that the walk would do him good. I walked with him for about a mile and found him fine company. As he had already been walking for several hours before I met him, I made a secret resolve to speed ahead, and bring him back a pump after all, so waving a cheery farewell, departed. It was a very small town; but the local store was well-stocked and soon procured me a pump. I left my pack with the storekeeper and raced back to the lad. We had the puncture repaired in a few minutes; but then discovered that the front fork was practically broken through. It would have been dangerous to ride, so it had to be wheeled after all.
  
-My newly-found friend was due back at Hobart the following evening, and the only means of conveyance was the mail-car, at the exhorbit ant price of 15/- for the trip, which sum he did not possess. However, by pooling our brains, we soon formulated a brilliant plan. We put up at the local hotel at l/6 a head, and next Morning sent the damaged bike on to Hobart for 1/-, per the mail car, while we both set out with my bike to do the 25 miles to Hobart.+My newly-found friend was due back at Hobart the following evening, and the only means of conveyance was the mail-car, at the exorbitant ​price of 15/- for the trip, which sum he did not possess. However, by pooling our brains, we soon formulated a brilliant plan. We put up at the local hotel at l/6 a head, and next Morning sent the damaged bike on to Hobart for 1/-, per the mail car, while we both set out with my bike to do the 25 miles to Hobart.
  
 Double-banking was impossible on the equally impossible roads, so we worked on the following system. I would ride the bike down a hill and up the next, at the top of which I would leave it by the roadside and walk on. By the time I was at the bottom of the next hill my rear-man would have reached the bike, and would ride it down the hill and up the next, on whose summit he would leave it for me and walk on. In this way we achieved many miles. We were resting at the bottom of a steep hill, paddling in the creek and eating the interminable blackberry, when a lorry of road-workers pulled up and offered us a lift for six or seven miles. This was very cheering; but the piece of information passed on by one of the men was far from cheering; to wit, that my map was decidedly faulty. (We still had twenty-nine miles to do to reach Hobart.) However, they told us that several timber lorries would be passing through within the two hours, and we could easily get a lift in. So we cheered up again, and sure enough, we hadn't left the road-workers more than a mile behind when a timber lorry pulled up, and we heaved the bike aboard and were driven right into town to the Mail Depot, where my companion of the road regained possession of his vehicle. I accompanied him to the local oxy-welder'​s,​ where he wished to have his bike repaired. Double-banking was impossible on the equally impossible roads, so we worked on the following system. I would ride the bike down a hill and up the next, at the top of which I would leave it by the roadside and walk on. By the time I was at the bottom of the next hill my rear-man would have reached the bike, and would ride it down the hill and up the next, on whose summit he would leave it for me and walk on. In this way we achieved many miles. We were resting at the bottom of a steep hill, paddling in the creek and eating the interminable blackberry, when a lorry of road-workers pulled up and offered us a lift for six or seven miles. This was very cheering; but the piece of information passed on by one of the men was far from cheering; to wit, that my map was decidedly faulty. (We still had twenty-nine miles to do to reach Hobart.) However, they told us that several timber lorries would be passing through within the two hours, and we could easily get a lift in. So we cheered up again, and sure enough, we hadn't left the road-workers more than a mile behind when a timber lorry pulled up, and we heaved the bike aboard and were driven right into town to the Mail Depot, where my companion of the road regained possession of his vehicle. I accompanied him to the local oxy-welder'​s,​ where he wished to have his bike repaired.
193605.txt · Last modified: 2015/11/30 01:26 by sbw