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193601 [2015/01/16 00:26]
elddawt Completed. Ready for another pair of eyes.
193601 [2015/07/30 03:36] (current)
sbw
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-====== ​"The Sydney Bushwalker" ​======+====== The Sydney Bushwalker ======
  
 A Journal devoted to matters of interest to Members of The Sydney Bush.Walkers,​ Sydney, New South Wales. A Journal devoted to matters of interest to Members of The Sydney Bush.Walkers,​ Sydney, New South Wales.
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 But quite a few members of the Club were camped at Era - some at "Lower Bugville"​ and a select few "Above the Pump". But quite a few members of the Club were camped at Era - some at "Lower Bugville"​ and a select few "Above the Pump".
  
-Various members of the Coast and Mountain Walkers were also camped at Era, although their programme stated "North Era", so there must be something very attractive about this little spot, at anyrate ​to those at the combined campfires, if we can judge by the fervour with which they sang the old song: "Put me on the Train for Era".+Various members of the Coast and Mountain Walkers were also camped at Era, although their programme stated "North Era", so there must be something very attractive about this little spot, at any rate to those at the combined campfires, if we can judge by the fervour with which they sang the old song: "Put me on the Train for Era".
  
 The weather, as is usual at that place and that time of the year, was anything but typically Australian Summer, still those who were lucky enough to be down over the whole holiday period struck some fine days - but has anyone thought of asking the weather man what has happened to Sunny New South Wales that the first week-end of the year should be such as to wash the remaining campers out of Era? The weather, as is usual at that place and that time of the year, was anything but typically Australian Summer, still those who were lucky enough to be down over the whole holiday period struck some fine days - but has anyone thought of asking the weather man what has happened to Sunny New South Wales that the first week-end of the year should be such as to wash the remaining campers out of Era?
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 ===== Dirty Weather on Mount Solitary. ===== ===== Dirty Weather on Mount Solitary. =====
  
-The urge to climb has led to some cold and uncomfortable camps, and August Bank Holiday week end proved no exception. Ninian, Reg and I left by the 6-35 train for Wentworth Falls on Friday night with the intention of climbing Mount Solitary from the North East extremity and exploring generally. We camped that night in the shelter of the pine trees at the sanitorium, and next morning at breakfast the Scot arrived all done up in many layers of shirts, sweaters, and singlets, complete with woollen balaclava and gloves.+The urge to climb has led to some cold and uncomfortable camps, and August Bank Holiday week end proved no exception. Ninian ​[Ninian Melville], Reg and I left by the 6-35 train for Wentworth Falls on Friday night with the intention of climbing Mount Solitary from the North East extremity and exploring generally. We camped that night in the shelter of the pine trees at the sanitorium, and next morning at breakfast the Scot arrived all done up in many layers of shirts, sweaters, and singlets, complete with woollen balaclava and gloves.
  
 The previous day the papers had predicted gales of wind, torrential rain, hail, and dust storms; we had read, shivered, and hoped for the best, but when Scotty averred that light snow had already fallen we jeered - but as if to prove him quite sane, snow began to fall then and there, and we ate our breakfast with the food rapidly freezing on the plates. The previous day the papers had predicted gales of wind, torrential rain, hail, and dust storms; we had read, shivered, and hoped for the best, but when Scotty averred that light snow had already fallen we jeered - but as if to prove him quite sane, snow began to fall then and there, and we ate our breakfast with the food rapidly freezing on the plates.
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 Ed. Ed.
  
-===== Our "​Reporter"​ Interviews the Secretary ===== +===== Our "​Reporter"​(( Jack Debert )) Interviews the Secretary =====
- +
-(( "Jack Dean" (?) Handwriting difficult to read ))+
  
 After months of waiting I rescued her on a free Friday night (so generously donated to club members by an over zealous social committee) at the club. She was surrounded by people and nigh snowed under with a pile of maps. So I dragged her off to a - , was going to write quiet corner, but there never is such a thing at the Sydney Bush Walkers'​ club rooms on a Friday night. ​ Anyway I managed to secure an interview. "What first attracted you to the S.B.W. Club, Dorothy?"​ was my leading question to our present efficient secretary. After months of waiting I rescued her on a free Friday night (so generously donated to club members by an over zealous social committee) at the club. She was surrounded by people and nigh snowed under with a pile of maps. So I dragged her off to a - , was going to write quiet corner, but there never is such a thing at the Sydney Bush Walkers'​ club rooms on a Friday night. ​ Anyway I managed to secure an interview. "What first attracted you to the S.B.W. Club, Dorothy?"​ was my leading question to our present efficient secretary.
  
-"The fact that the world is round and large and that the party I used to go walking with had hied themselves to the four corners of this happy old place commonly known as the world" was the forthcoming reply. Out came my notebook and pencil. Already I was wwming ​to my work. This was going to be an interview worth having. Of course in real life reporters do not produce notebooks when interviewing. If they did the person being interviewed would talk about every subject under the sun other than the one under discussion. But I am not a reporter. I was merely ordered to secure an interview from Dorothy by our exacting editor.+"The fact that the world is round and large and that the party I used to go walking with had hied themselves to the four corners of this happy old place commonly known as the world" was the forthcoming reply. Out came my notebook and pencil. Already I was warming ​to my work. This was going to be an interview worth having. Of course in real life reporters do not produce notebooks when interviewing. If they did the person being interviewed would talk about every subject under the sun other than the one under discussion. But I am not a reporter. I was merely ordered to secure an interview from Dorothy by our exacting editor.
  
 "​Dorothea Taylor, who has a kink that way, wrote an article for the "​Australian Naturalist"​. Now a very inquiring sort of a person, by name of Anice Duncan, having read the said article, wrote to Dorothea. So the little Dunc was invited to come for a walk with us. It was on that walk, which was from Lilyvale to Burning Palms, that I first met Frank and you, Jack. Naturally I learned lots about the S.B.W."​ "​Dorothea Taylor, who has a kink that way, wrote an article for the "​Australian Naturalist"​. Now a very inquiring sort of a person, by name of Anice Duncan, having read the said article, wrote to Dorothea. So the little Dunc was invited to come for a walk with us. It was on that walk, which was from Lilyvale to Burning Palms, that I first met Frank and you, Jack. Naturally I learned lots about the S.B.W."​
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 "After long years of office on so many committees and sub-committees,​ do you not feel the strain of public office?"​ "After long years of office on so many committees and sub-committees,​ do you not feel the strain of public office?"​
  
-"I must admit I do. But it is so intensly ​interesting,​ still it is very fatiguing when the meetings are prolonged until 11 p.m."+"I must admit I do. But it is so intensely ​interesting,​ still it is very fatiguing when the meetings are prolonged until 11 p.m."
  
 "Do you prefer long trips with only ladies in the party?"​ "Do you prefer long trips with only ladies in the party?"​
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 Guard them, and thee, forever, from mankind! Guard them, and thee, forever, from mankind!
  
-D. Lawry.+D. Lawry. ​[Dorothy Lawry]
  
 ===== Things We Haven'​t Yet Invented. (No. 1) ===== ===== Things We Haven'​t Yet Invented. (No. 1) =====
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 We made back to camp, prepared tucker of bully beef, rice and bread, dined heartily, and after placing our plates and mugs under drips from the walls, to be washed clean, we yarned around the fire. When later we turned in the mist became heavier, lightning played with increasing frequency, each flash being followed later by a roll of thunder. The lightning became more vivid and the time interval between flash and thunder decreased, while the sound increased. The storm-centre was rapidly approaching our camp cave. The lightning became inceasant (( [sic] ))and the thunder rolled continuously,​ until a sudden flash, brighter than usual, accompanied simultaneously by a terrific crash, caused the air to shake and gave the impression that the solid rock shook also. We lay in our blankets, silent. Two similar crashes occurred in quick succession. I looked at the rocks above our bunks, decided I could do nothing, so attempted to sleep. Fortunately I succeeded. What happened after, may be known to George and Aub.- I haven'​t asked them. A thunderstorm in Sydney is one thing but one at Kanangra is entirely different. We made back to camp, prepared tucker of bully beef, rice and bread, dined heartily, and after placing our plates and mugs under drips from the walls, to be washed clean, we yarned around the fire. When later we turned in the mist became heavier, lightning played with increasing frequency, each flash being followed later by a roll of thunder. The lightning became more vivid and the time interval between flash and thunder decreased, while the sound increased. The storm-centre was rapidly approaching our camp cave. The lightning became inceasant (( [sic] ))and the thunder rolled continuously,​ until a sudden flash, brighter than usual, accompanied simultaneously by a terrific crash, caused the air to shake and gave the impression that the solid rock shook also. We lay in our blankets, silent. Two similar crashes occurred in quick succession. I looked at the rocks above our bunks, decided I could do nothing, so attempted to sleep. Fortunately I succeeded. What happened after, may be known to George and Aub.- I haven'​t asked them. A thunderstorm in Sydney is one thing but one at Kanangra is entirely different.
  
-Monday broke fine but cloudy. We spent the day in photography and rough surveying. One photo necessitated my laying on the stomach and holding the camera over the edge of the walls. I looked down - the vertical drop was 200 or 300 feet, followed by one hugh (( [sic] )) steep talus to the creek away down below. I hope that photo was worth the risk taken. We measured the depth of the gorge by trig. methods. The height from the walls to the creek is 1119 feet. This is also the depth which Kanangra Brook tumbles in a series of waterfalls (the Kalang Falls). Farther dawn Kanangra Creek (the Grand Gorge) the depth beoomes ​greater, awing to the rapid fall in the creek bed.+Monday broke fine but cloudy. We spent the day in photography and rough surveying. One photo necessitated my laying on the stomach and holding the camera over the edge of the walls. I looked down - the vertical drop was 200 or 300 feet, followed by one huge steep talus to the creek away down below. I hope that photo was worth the risk taken. We measured the depth of the gorge by trig. methods. The height from the walls to the creek is 1119 feet. This is also the depth which Kanangra Brook tumbles in a series of waterfalls (the Kalang Falls). Farther dawn Kanangra Creek (the Grand Gorge) the depth becomes ​greater, awing to the rapid fall in the creek bed.
  
 This day we covered practically the whole of the plateau and made a rough survey, to correct existing maps. Whilst sitting on the edge of a wall we were startled by a small hawk which swooped towards us from the rear and rushed past about 10 feet distant. The sound, being unexpected, certainly gave us a start. This day we covered practically the whole of the plateau and made a rough survey, to correct existing maps. Whilst sitting on the edge of a wall we were startled by a small hawk which swooped towards us from the rear and rushed past about 10 feet distant. The sound, being unexpected, certainly gave us a start.
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 So help me bob, So help me bob,
  
-Jack Der Bert.+Jack Der Bert. [Jack Debert]
  
 ===== "A Bloody, Lousy Walk." ===== ===== "A Bloody, Lousy Walk." =====
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 Hon. Social Secretary. Hon. Social Secretary.
- 
  
193601.txt · Last modified: 2015/07/30 03:36 by sbw