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193508 [2015/02/26 05:12]
elddawt Minor edit
193508 [2015/11/09 05:05] (current)
sbw
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 There is a Club that's known to me\\  There is a Club that's known to me\\ 
-Of perepetetic ​people who\\ +Of peripatetic ​people who\\ 
 The open air and freedom woo\\  The open air and freedom woo\\ 
 By mountain top and tumbling sea. By mountain top and tumbling sea.
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 And then there'​s the Berts, so large and well known,​\\ ​ And then there'​s the Berts, so large and well known,​\\ ​
-The "​Der"​ of that ilk for his laughter'​s ​renouned,\\ +The "​Der"​ of that ilk for his laughter'​s ​renowned,\\ 
 For the rafters do ring and the echoes rebound,​\\ ​ For the rafters do ring and the echoes rebound,​\\ ​
 While struggles the "​Her"​ with the President'​s Bone. While struggles the "​Her"​ with the President'​s Bone.
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 And their spirit is young as it always has been. And their spirit is young as it always has been.
  
-(( Page 3 - Unable to read handwitten ​signature - Barney, Barry ? ))+(( Page 3 - Unable to read handwritten ​signature - Barney, Barry ? ))
  
 ---- ----
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 The Paringa homestead had not been lavishly stocked against the possibility of a prolonged rainy seige, but there were sheep grazing in the fields and potatoes growing in the garden so, when the rain increased, we could regard the   ​possibility of being marooned as simply another adventure. The Paringa homestead had not been lavishly stocked against the possibility of a prolonged rainy seige, but there were sheep grazing in the fields and potatoes growing in the garden so, when the rain increased, we could regard the   ​possibility of being marooned as simply another adventure.
  
-We were not marooned, but it teemed so continuously during the night that Mr. Condon reckoned if he did not put us back across the Paringa river at once, it would be impossible to do so later, and as for the guides, well, even then he was doubtful if he could get them down safely. The Otoko is a more difficuly (( sic )) valley than the Mahitahi, for it offers no exit on foot. You start up an the south bank of the Paringa, that is, the bank opposite to Mahitahi, to the aeroplane landing-ground and to civilization. You cross the Paringa, and continue up the Otoko, its tributary, still on the south bank. Thus in summer it is impossible to get out without horses to assist you across the rivers, and by reason of the rivers rising you may not be able to get out at all. Had I realized these difficulties at the time, I do not think I should have consented to the Otoko trip when there was only a week left, and the certainty of missing the Sydney boat if the usual West Coast rain fell at the critical time. We had now only about four spare days, so we sadly agreed to return, debating who was the most to be pitied:- Frank and Harry who had packed up all that stuff in vain, Mr. Condon who had wasted two days away from his work, Marjorie who prefers high-climbing and had given it up this year to go exploring with me, or myself who had waited six years for a holiday and had so far had only four days on the snow, ice and rock.+We were not marooned, but it teemed so continuously during the night that Mr. Condon reckoned if he did not put us back across the Paringa river at once, it would be impossible to do so later, and as for the guides, well, even then he was doubtful if he could get them down safely. The Otoko is a more difficuly (( sic )) valley than the Mahitahi, for it offers no exit on foot. You start up an the south bank of the Paringa, that is, the bank opposite to Mahitahi, to the aeroplane landing-ground and to civilization. You cross the Paringa, and continue up the Otoko, its tributary, still on the south bank. Thus in summer it is impossible to get out without horses to assist you across the rivers, and by reason of the rivers rising you may not be able to get out at all. Had I realized these difficulties at the time, I do not think I should have consented to the Otoko trip when there was only a week left, and the certainty of missing the Sydney boat if the usual West Coast rain fell at the critical time. We had now only about four spare days, so we sadly agreed to return, debating who was the most to be pitied:- Frank and Harry who had packed up all that stuff in vain, Mr. Condon who had wasted two days away from his work, Marjorie who prefers high-climbing and had given it up this year to go exploring with me, or myself who had waited six years for a holiday and had so far had only four days on the snow, ice and rock.
  
-Mr. Condon put us back across the river whose waters swirled far above the stirrups, and went back to get the guides while we hiked tack to Mahitahi between sun and shower, often wondering, when the sun momentarily lit the mountain, whether it was cowardice or wisdom which had turned us back from the quest of unclimbed peaks. When Frank and Harry arrived back that evening they said that, so far from expecting ** us**, they had not even expected Mr. Condon, and had quite resigned themselves to some days in a wet camp, for the sunlight that had occasiona1ly lit our pathway had never showed itself in the mountain fastnesses, where the storm had raged with unabated fury all night and all day. They had had a difficult time getting out, and once when the water was above his horses head Frank said he had all but made up his mind to jump into the river to save his life, but his foot caught in the stirrup and prevented him. They arrived lack wet and weary, but cheered by the thought of unlimited supplies of hot water in the Candon's bathroom to make up for some of the uncalled for cold baths which nature had meted out during the last twenty-four hours. Frank turned on the hot tap in eager anticipation - and cold water ran out! It was the last straw!+Mr. Condon put us back across the river whose waters swirled far above the stirrups, and went back to get the guides while we hiked tack to Mahitahi between sun and shower, often wondering, when the sun momentarily lit the mountain, whether it was cowardice or wisdom which had turned us back from the quest of unclimbed peaks. When Frank and Harry arrived back that evening they said that, so far from expecting ** us**, they had not even expected Mr. Condon, and had quite resigned themselves to some days in a wet camp, for the sunlight that had occasiona1ly lit our pathway had never showed itself in the mountain fastnesses, where the storm had raged with unabated fury all night and all day. They had had a difficult time getting out, and once when the water was above his horses head Frank said he had all but made up his mind to jump into the river to save his life, but his foot caught in the stirrup and prevented him. They arrived lack wet and weary, but cheered by the thought of unlimited supplies of hot water in the Condon's bathroom to make up for some of the uncalled for cold baths which nature had meted out during the last twenty-four hours. Frank turned on the hot tap in eager anticipation - and cold water ran out! It was the last straw!
  
 In the meantime there was precisely a week left till the date of my departure from Weheka for Christchurch and Sydney, and I did want unspeakably to feel my feet on the snow and ice once again; besides I wanted Marjorie to have at least one decent high climb to take back with her. So I decided - with Marjorie'​s full concurrence,​ for Marjorie, as I have said, is the most unselfishly obliging of people - to go back to Weheka at once, and from there to a civilized alpine hut whence we could retreat on the due date even if bad weather came up. Of course we wanted to return by aeroplane, but we found it was booked up for the Tuesday, and, as we did not want to waste that day, a horse and trap to Karangarua river, and horses thence, were ordered. Once again the moon rose clear and cloudless in a cold, bright, frosty sky with every promise of a perfect morrow. And once again we woke to the sound of rain! It was not serious, but clouds continued to hang over the mountains all day, a consoling thought, for mountaineers,​ although they frequent haunts nearer heaven than ordinary mortals are nevertheless no more angelic, and it would not have been pleasant to think that other folk were climbing when we were not. The horse and trap took us along the grey shingly shoreline where gaunt flax leaves flapped ​ in the wind and the forest was bent low and compacted, and looked like hedges in old-fashioned English gardens. At intervals along the coast were shacks inhabited by gold-washers,​ mostly Maoris and half-castes. The streaks of black sand among the grey are prolific in gold and they wash it in races leading from the numerous streams. Some had cultivated small gardens in the thick rich soil, but for the most part, I was told, they are a happy-go-lucky people with the heretical view of household economy that money should be spent as soon as it is earned and without regard to the future. In the meantime there was precisely a week left till the date of my departure from Weheka for Christchurch and Sydney, and I did want unspeakably to feel my feet on the snow and ice once again; besides I wanted Marjorie to have at least one decent high climb to take back with her. So I decided - with Marjorie'​s full concurrence,​ for Marjorie, as I have said, is the most unselfishly obliging of people - to go back to Weheka at once, and from there to a civilized alpine hut whence we could retreat on the due date even if bad weather came up. Of course we wanted to return by aeroplane, but we found it was booked up for the Tuesday, and, as we did not want to waste that day, a horse and trap to Karangarua river, and horses thence, were ordered. Once again the moon rose clear and cloudless in a cold, bright, frosty sky with every promise of a perfect morrow. And once again we woke to the sound of rain! It was not serious, but clouds continued to hang over the mountains all day, a consoling thought, for mountaineers,​ although they frequent haunts nearer heaven than ordinary mortals are nevertheless no more angelic, and it would not have been pleasant to think that other folk were climbing when we were not. The horse and trap took us along the grey shingly shoreline where gaunt flax leaves flapped ​ in the wind and the forest was bent low and compacted, and looked like hedges in old-fashioned English gardens. At intervals along the coast were shacks inhabited by gold-washers,​ mostly Maoris and half-castes. The streaks of black sand among the grey are prolific in gold and they wash it in races leading from the numerous streams. Some had cultivated small gardens in the thick rich soil, but for the most part, I was told, they are a happy-go-lucky people with the heretical view of household economy that money should be spent as soon as it is earned and without regard to the future.
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 They may have been inferior to those in other years, but to me they formed temples of the ice-goddess,​ blue and silver spires gleaming against the dark sky; I could have worshipped among them for ever. They may have been inferior to those in other years, but to me they formed temples of the ice-goddess,​ blue and silver spires gleaming against the dark sky; I could have worshipped among them for ever.
  
-From there we passed under Paschendale,​ a scree-slope named after the fatal region on the French Front. Before the Great Earthquake these slopes were scrub-covered. Since then the whole hillside has been falling away continuously. And in the night we could hear the thunder of the bombs falling onto the glacier moraine from the heights above. ​Paschemdale ​is a dangerous spot and one does not linger long beneath it, but like many dangerous things it is tempting, for it brings down fresh-faced geological specimens of immunerable (( (sic) )) varieties all ready broken for the collector. Coming back I collected a large number and trustingly gave them to Harry to transport for me. When we rested to take off our crampons Satan led Harry'​s mind to other matters, and the lovely fresh specimens - fully 10 lbs of them - were left behind, a matter in which I suspoet ​the reader'​s sympathies will be with Harry rather than with me!+From there we passed under Paschendale,​ a scree-slope named after the fatal region on the French Front. Before the Great Earthquake these slopes were scrub-covered. Since then the whole hillside has been falling away continuously. And in the night we could hear the thunder of the bombs falling onto the glacier moraine from the heights above. ​Paschendale ​is a dangerous spot and one does not linger long beneath it, but like many dangerous things it is tempting, for it brings down fresh-faced geological specimens of innumerable ​varieties all ready broken for the collector. Coming back I collected a large number and trustingly gave them to Harry to transport for me. When we rested to take off our crampons Satan led Harry'​s mind to other matters, and the lovely fresh specimens - fully 10 lbs of them - were left behind, a matter in which I suspect ​the reader'​s sympathies will be with Harry rather than with me!
  
 From Paschendale we cut across the glacier again and up Purgatory Creek, so-called because Frank first made his way up it when the snow was deep and the sun was hot. This day it was merely a semi-dry gully and beside it grew lingering mountains lilies with their snow-white flowers and their cupped leaves already gathering the rain which had started to fall once more. From Paschendale we cut across the glacier again and up Purgatory Creek, so-called because Frank first made his way up it when the snow was deep and the sun was hot. This day it was merely a semi-dry gully and beside it grew lingering mountains lilies with their snow-white flowers and their cupped leaves already gathering the rain which had started to fall once more.
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 When the alarm woke us at some ghost-haunted hour the rain was heavier and we turned over to sleep again. However, half way through the morning it stopped, and though a damp mist blanketed everything, Frank was not the one to waste a "​fine"​ day. So out we went into the piercing wind and a world of white, and climbed Chancellor Dome, a snowy summit 7000 foot high, while the mist gradually changed to drizzle. The only things we saw were gardens of golden mountain lilies, edelweiss and gentians, and a fleeting glimpse of a shodowy (( (sic)  )), flooded river flowing into a silver sea. When the alarm woke us at some ghost-haunted hour the rain was heavier and we turned over to sleep again. However, half way through the morning it stopped, and though a damp mist blanketed everything, Frank was not the one to waste a "​fine"​ day. So out we went into the piercing wind and a world of white, and climbed Chancellor Dome, a snowy summit 7000 foot high, while the mist gradually changed to drizzle. The only things we saw were gardens of golden mountain lilies, edelweiss and gentians, and a fleeting glimpse of a shodowy (( (sic)  )), flooded river flowing into a silver sea.
  
-All that night, all next day and the next the storm increased in fury, and the dread thunder of Paschendale'​s bombs echoed up the valley. Each gust of wind shook the anchorage of the hut and it seemed impossible that it could not break loose and go hurtling over the precipice. The gale rose higher and higher, water flooded in under the close-fastened doors, and we had to shout to make ourselves heard. And yet there was a water-shortage! Any receptacle placed under the pouring eves would have been blown away as soon as it had been placed there, while to have gone down to the creek a few yards away would have meant getting wet to the skin. Whenever there was a lull Frank and Marjorie continued their arguments about traverses and keas, along with a new one about booking up guides. Harry read dilapidated magazines, and I tried to make up limerics (( (sic) )) with a suitably pathetic note, for example:-+All that night, all next day and the next the storm increased in fury, and the dread thunder of Paschendale'​s bombs echoed up the valley. Each gust of wind shook the anchorage of the hut and it seemed impossible that it could not break loose and go hurtling over the precipice. The gale rose higher and higher, water flooded in under the close-fastened doors, and we had to shout to make ourselves heard. And yet there was a water-shortage! Any receptacle placed under the pouring eves would have been blown away as soon as it had been placed there, while to have gone down to the creek a few yards away would have meant getting wet to the skin. Whenever there was a lull Frank and Marjorie continued their arguments about traverses and keas, along with a new one about booking up guides. Harry read dilapidated magazines, and I tried to make up limericks ​with a suitably pathetic note, for example:-
  
 "They tell Me that Chancellor Ridge has a view,​\\ ​ "They tell Me that Chancellor Ridge has a view,​\\ ​
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-===== The Great Kowmung ​Conspiricy ​=====+===== The Great Kowmung ​Conspiracy ​=====
  
 When George Dibley, Arthur Yardley and I started out from Bexley at 4.30a.m. on Saturday 29th. Dec. 1934, we were not aware that such a thing as a Great Kowmung Conspiracy existed. But we do now; and if you read to the end of this article ** you ** will become a member of this conspiracy, and as such bound to keep your mouth shut. For it is a conspiracy of silence. When George Dibley, Arthur Yardley and I started out from Bexley at 4.30a.m. on Saturday 29th. Dec. 1934, we were not aware that such a thing as a Great Kowmung Conspiracy existed. But we do now; and if you read to the end of this article ** you ** will become a member of this conspiracy, and as such bound to keep your mouth shut. For it is a conspiracy of silence.
  
-As we had only 4 days for our trip, we went by car direct to Yerranderie,​ arriving at 8.30 a.m. We gave the little mining town "the once over", ate a second breakfast and at 10.30 moved off in the direction of Byrne'​s ​Gap.+As we had only 4 days for our trip, we went by car direct to Yerranderie,​ arriving at 8.30 a.m. We gave the little mining town "the once over", ate a second breakfast and at 10.30 moved off in the direction of Byrnes ​Gap.
  
 The Church Creek route to the Kowmung was our choice, but meeting a bushman named King, we accepted his advice and branched off at the Cedar Creek turnoff, following a good track down to the river, which we reached at 1.30 p.m. The Church Creek route to the Kowmung was our choice, but meeting a bushman named King, we accepted his advice and branched off at the Cedar Creek turnoff, following a good track down to the river, which we reached at 1.30 p.m.
  
-Two or three miles downstream we came to the entrance to the Bulga Denis canyon, where camp was made, between Sunset and Sunrise Bluffs. Thus far, and indeed throughout the entire trip the weather was perfect, being warm and fine. We were loath to leave this lovely spot; but with the dreaded canyon before us we rose early to our task and were away before 8 o'​clock on Sunday morning. The canyon proved a disappointment - and a relief. At no time was the going really rough and though the river was above the usual summer level we had no difficulty in making the ten or twelve crossings necessary to expedite our progress. We were out of the canyon in about 3 hours and had our lunch on a beautiful stretch of the river somewhere near Roots' Route. A pleasant stroll down the easygoing middle ​Kaomung ​to the Cedar Road completed our day's walk.+Two or three miles downstream we came to the entrance to the Bulga Denis Canyon, where camp was made, between Sunset and Sunrise Bluffs. Thus far, and indeed throughout the entire trip the weather was perfect, being warm and fine. We were loath to leave this lovely spot; but with the dreaded canyon before us we rose early to our task and were away before 8 o'​clock on Sunday morning. The canyon proved a disappointment - and a relief. At no time was the going really rough and though the river was above the usual summer level we had no difficulty in making the ten or twelve crossings necessary to expedite our progress. We were out of the canyon in about 3 hours and had our lunch on a beautiful stretch of the river somewhere near Roots' Route. A pleasant stroll down the easygoing middle ​Kowmung ​to the Cedar Road completed our day's walk.
  
-On the following day history repeated itself. We had heard terrible tales of the lower Kownung ​- how rough it was, etc. etc. Again the party moved on its way expecting the worst - and the worst never came. Starting about 8 o'​clock - and allowing an hour for swimming in the delightfully warm river, we reached the Cox at 12.30, in a little under 2½ (( 2.5 )) hours of easy walking. Only the last mile and a half was at all rough and even that was not so bad.+On the following day history repeated itself. We had heard terrible tales of the lower Kowmung ​- how rough it was, etc. etc. Again the party moved on its way expecting the worst - and the worst never came. Starting about 8 o'​clock - and allowing an hour for swimming in the delightfully warm river, we reached the Coxs at 12.30, in a little under 2½ (( 2.5 )) hours of easy walking. Only the last mile and a half was at all rough and even that was not so bad.
  
-From the Cedar Road for two or three miles there is a broad easy track (which seems to be a continuation of the road) then a crossing, recross, then stay on the left bank till you reach the Cox.\\ +From the Cedar Road for two or three miles there is a broad easy track (which seems to be a continuation of the road) then a crossing, recross, then stay on the left bank till you reach the Coxs.\\ 
 (By the way: a tip for all intending voyagers - always cross the river where cattle cross. They,​ being resident in the district, know the best crossings). (By the way: a tip for all intending voyagers - always cross the river where cattle cross. They,​ being resident in the district, know the best crossings).
  
-As we munched our lunch and stared at the muddy waters of the Cox it gradually dawned on us that there was a reason for these Kowmung yarns - about it being rough and so forth. It keeps the Kommung ​exclusive for real walkers. You see, the Cox is a kind of highway for anybody who humps a pack from Katoomba or Wentworth Falls; and so it happens that when adventurous youths reach the juncture, they recall the terrible tales, shudder and pass on. The lower mile or so being a bit rough adds colour to the tale and gives an appearance of authenticity.+As we munched our lunch and stared at the muddy waters of the Cox it gradually dawned on us that there was a reason for these Kowmung yarns - about it being rough and so forth. It keeps the Kowmung ​exclusive for real walkers. You see, the Cox is a kind of highway for anybody who humps a pack from Katoomba or Wentworth Falls; and so it happens that when adventurous youths reach the juncture, they recall the terrible tales, shudder and pass on. The lower mile or so being a bit rough adds colour to the tale and gives an appearance of authenticity.
  
 So much for the Kowmung Conspiracy. We toddled down the Cox and encountered some young men loafing just below Black Dog. They enquired about the Kowmung, so we entered into the spirit of the game and told them - just enough to make them give up any idea of tackling it. Their chief concern seemed to be a desire to shoot kangaroos and wallabies so we felt quite justified. So much for the Kowmung Conspiracy. We toddled down the Cox and encountered some young men loafing just below Black Dog. They enquired about the Kowmung, so we entered into the spirit of the game and told them - just enough to make them give up any idea of tackling it. Their chief concern seemed to be a desire to shoot kangaroos and wallabies so we felt quite justified.
  
-Our final camp was on the Cox at Cedar Creek and on New Year's Day we set off over the back track (not marked on Blue Mountains - Burragorang map) which climbs the ridge at the lower side of Cedar Creek and skirts ​Koorowall ​Buttress, to Maxwells in Kedumbah ​Valley. This track is easy to negotiate from the Cox, and cutting off Kill's Defile, saves at least a couple of miles.+Our final camp was on the Cox at Cedar Creek and on New Year's Day we set off over the back track (not marked on Blue Mountains - Burragorang map) which climbs the ridge at the lower side of Cedar Creek and skirts ​Korrowall ​Buttress, to Maxwells in Kedumba ​Valley. This track is easy to negotiate from the Cox, and cutting off Kill's Defile, saves at least a couple of miles.
  
-So our journey draws to a close, (( (sic) )) Most of you have shaken hands with Mr. Maxwell - if not, do so. It's an exciting experience (especially for girls). ​Kedumbah ​Pass is still much the same, thank you, rather warm on a warm day; but we eventually got to the top and so to Wentworth Falls, where ended a really notable trip. You see, everything worked out perfectly, weather, walking conditions, scenery, company, food were all ideal. And no women, either. I've come to the reluctant conclusion that Wally Roots is  right - a buck's trip is best. Let men go walking alone for enjoyment, women'​s place is in the home.+So our journey draws to a close, (( (sic) )) Most of you have shaken hands with Mr. Maxwell - if not, do so. It's an exciting experience (especially for girls). ​Kedumba ​Pass is still much the same, thank you, rather warm on a warm day; but we eventually got to the top and so to Wentworth Falls, where ended a really notable trip. You see, everything worked out perfectly, weather, walking conditions, scenery, company, food were all ideal. And no women, either. I've come to the reluctant conclusion that Wally Roots is  right - a buck's trip is best. Let men go walking alone for enjoyment, women'​s place is in the home.
  
 Edgar Yardley. Edgar Yardley.
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 Why should terrible things happen to Bill Cawood and me at Easter? Why should terrible things happen to Bill Cawood and me at Easter?
  
-Easter 1934 we walked further, had more blisters, and contracted more ptomaine poisoning than all the other Bushwalker'​s ​put together.+Easter 1934 we walked further, had more blisters, and contracted more ptomaine poisoning than all the other Bushwalkers ​put together.
  
-Easter 1935, Ouch!!! Someone convinced me I should go down the Upper Cox River, there were only shout 200 going and one more was required to make a nice sized party.+Easter 1935, Ouch!!! Someone convinced me I should go down the Upper Coxs River, there were only shout 200 going and one more was required to make a nice sized party.
  
 Of course at Easter, as usual, the party left Sydney on Thursday night, I worked on Saturday morning and followed on with Bill in the afternoon. Of course at Easter, as usual, the party left Sydney on Thursday night, I worked on Saturday morning and followed on with Bill in the afternoon.
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 Bill, being overome with a wave of generosity, pushed half a meat pie under the dog's nose and was immediately sniffed at and treated with utmost contempt. Bill, being overome with a wave of generosity, pushed half a meat pie under the dog's nose and was immediately sniffed at and treated with utmost contempt.
  
-I have had similar experiences to that when attempting to make conversation with a fellow traveller on a long distance train, and somehow that dog's action told me that this trip was not going to be so good Well, about half past the time the train was due to leave it looked as though it had taken two Seidlitz powders without mixing them first, the pressure of people inside bulged it almost to bursting point,+I have had similar experiences to that when attempting to make conversation with a fellow traveller on a long distance train, and somehow that dog's action told me that this trip was not going to be so goodWell, about half past the time the train was due to leave it looked as though it had taken two Seidlitz powders without mixing them first, the pressure of people inside bulged it almost to bursting point,
  
 After much blowing of whistles, clanging of bells and "get aboards"​ the train began to stir itself. Whether it was the tiresome journey or the fact that Bill had surrounded the pies, I don't know, but the dog began thawing and when we reached Penrith three hours after leaving Sydney we took him in and introduced him to Clem and party, the act apparently not being appreciated by the other members of the compartment. After much blowing of whistles, clanging of bells and "get aboards"​ the train began to stir itself. Whether it was the tiresome journey or the fact that Bill had surrounded the pies, I don't know, but the dog began thawing and when we reached Penrith three hours after leaving Sydney we took him in and introduced him to Clem and party, the act apparently not being appreciated by the other members of the compartment.
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 The other forty people in the box compartment that we were transferred to left us at Katoomba, and Bill decided to change into shorts in the compartment when the train had about 100 yards to go to Blackheath Station. I hurriedly convinced him that his actions were unwise and he postponed the operation. Our compartment stopped at the foot of the steps and there was quite a crowd standing outside our door waiting for friends. I have never timed anyone changing his pants, but I'll bet Bill could only have done fifty per cent of the job by the time that our compartment had reached the foot of the steps. The other forty people in the box compartment that we were transferred to left us at Katoomba, and Bill decided to change into shorts in the compartment when the train had about 100 yards to go to Blackheath Station. I hurriedly convinced him that his actions were unwise and he postponed the operation. Our compartment stopped at the foot of the steps and there was quite a crowd standing outside our door waiting for friends. I have never timed anyone changing his pants, but I'll bet Bill could only have done fifty per cent of the job by the time that our compartment had reached the foot of the steps.
  
-Arriving at Mount Victoria we set out along the Great Western Road and were just passing ​Balley ​Heights again when we found we were going the wrong way. After retracing our steps we eventually returned to Mount Victoria and asked a fruit shop proprietor if we were going the right war; we were.+Arriving at Mount Victoria we set out along the Great Western Road and were just passing ​Valley ​Heights again when we found we were going the wrong way. After retracing our steps we eventually returned to Mount Victoria and asked a fruit shop proprietor if we were going the right war; we were.
  
 Well, everything was O.K., we knew the way, we had plenty to eat, and had plenty of time to do it in. Everything was lovely, so it started to rain, and it rained some more, and then it blew; and it blew cold, and along came a motor bike and many motor cars, the contents laughing at us, and more motor bikes, hundreds of them, thousands, millions -------- damn near fifty anyhow. Bill painted pictures of apple orchards we would pass where we could get some fruit and we cheered up a little, I had dreams of hot soup etc., that would be consumed when we met the party, Well, everything was O.K., we knew the way, we had plenty to eat, and had plenty of time to do it in. Everything was lovely, so it started to rain, and it rained some more, and then it blew; and it blew cold, and along came a motor bike and many motor cars, the contents laughing at us, and more motor bikes, hundreds of them, thousands, millions -------- damn near fifty anyhow. Bill painted pictures of apple orchards we would pass where we could get some fruit and we cheered up a little, I had dreams of hot soup etc., that would be consumed when we met the party,
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 A few happy hours were spent around a blazing log fire while voices were raised in song or we listened intently to a lone story teller. At length the sleeping bag lured us away, the fire sent a mellow glow up through the trees, and the sound of the bubbling river with the noises of the night replaced those of song and laughter. A few happy hours were spent around a blazing log fire while voices were raised in song or we listened intently to a lone story teller. At length the sleeping bag lured us away, the fire sent a mellow glow up through the trees, and the sound of the bubbling river with the noises of the night replaced those of song and laughter.
  
-It was decided upon to climb over the ridge 500ft. on the right hand bank, and to meet ths Cox on the other side, a decision that we all complied with because it was suggested by our able leader, "​Dunk"​.+It was decided upon to climb over the ridge 500ft. on the right hand bank, and to meet the Cox on the other side, a decision that we all complied with because it was suggested by our able leader, "​Dunk"​.
  
 From the top of the ridge we looked down into the Cox And could see the Jenolan Track winding away towards Megalong, while away in the distance Mount Colong could be seen garbed in blue mist while the Tin Pot Mountains, Black Dog Range and many other mountains, ranges and ridges could be defined. From the top of the ridge we looked down into the Cox And could see the Jenolan Track winding away towards Megalong, while away in the distance Mount Colong could be seen garbed in blue mist while the Tin Pot Mountains, Black Dog Range and many other mountains, ranges and ridges could be defined.
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 Considerable time was spent in lunching near the church in Megalong Valley, then we repacked for the last time, set out for Nellie'​s Glen and thence into Katoomba. Considerable time was spent in lunching near the church in Megalong Valley, then we repacked for the last time, set out for Nellie'​s Glen and thence into Katoomba.
  
-It is a beautiful trip down the Cox, making one oblivious ​ef anything but its beauty, charm and interesting points. I only wish I could say the same about the road walk out, but I suppose it doesn'​t always rain, always blow, and millions of motor bikes and motor cars can't pass there eternally, that's just my Easter luck.+It is a beautiful trip down the Cox, making one oblivious ​of anything but its beauty, charm and interesting points. I only wish I could say the same about the road walk out, but I suppose it doesn'​t always rain, always blow, and millions of motor bikes and motor cars can't pass there eternally, that's just my Easter luck.
  
 Ray Bean. Ray Bean.
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 You would all still be orphans, and unable to get possession of YOUR rightful heritage, and none would even, as now, look at you in the tram or bus, with your ridiculous Pack, and even more ridiculous appearance, and say to someone else - in a half whisper - and with an indulgent smile - "Busk (( [sic] )) Walker"​. And ** could** you, by any other name, look half so ** sweet**?"​ You would all still be orphans, and unable to get possession of YOUR rightful heritage, and none would even, as now, look at you in the tram or bus, with your ridiculous Pack, and even more ridiculous appearance, and say to someone else - in a half whisper - and with an indulgent smile - "Busk (( [sic] )) Walker"​. And ** could** you, by any other name, look half so ** sweet**?"​
  
-For, little Bush Walkers and Hikers (Oh sorry, it slipped out), you are now definitely, by the Federation'​s ​aotivitias, On the Map. See that you stay there. And be thankful to your Auntie Federation. And so, when your grandchild, say 1985 frolics in the surf at Burning Palms, probably wearing the latest 1985 costume of a gum leaf and a brassiere, she may look up the old slopes and say "Dear old Grandaddy. Now if he hadn's (( [sic] )) belonged to the Federation, and Grandma hadn't been one of those funny hikers (Oh Dear, there it is again), and they both hadn't fought together at Garawarra, what might have happened to me? Oh well, let's have another surf roll, or as the dear old things used to say in those days 'A Shoot' - Bless them".+For, little Bush Walkers and Hikers (Oh sorry, it slipped out), you are now definitely, by the Federation'​s ​activities, On the Map. See that you stay there. And be thankful to your Auntie Federation. And so, when your grandchild, say 1985 frolics in the surf at Burning Palms, probably wearing the latest 1985 costume of a gum leaf and a brassiere, she may look up the old slopes and say "Dear old Grandaddy. Now if he hadn'belonged to the Federation, and Grandma hadn't been one of those funny hikers (Oh Dear, there it is again), and they both hadn't fought together at Garawarra, what might have happened to me? Oh well, let's have another surf roll, or as the dear old things used to say in those days 'A Shoot' - Bless them".
  
 And then your great great grandchild. What are we thinking of now, and to what dim and distant date are we projecting our minds? To none other than the lst. of April, 2035, and the occasion of the Official Opening, assisted by the latest and most up-to-date squadron of aeroplanes, of the Great Western National Park and Primitive Phantasmagorical Area. The aeroplanes will be used to locate the original pioneering body of surveyors who set out to put the Area onto paper away back in 1958 (( ? Correct or typo for 1985?)) Legend will have had it that they paraded along Narrow Neck one wintry day, and after due ceremony set out with a fierce desire to be really primitive. Their old marching anthem has been lost sight of, but it ended up somehow like this - "We all can be primitive, primitively primitive, (Whoopee). We all can be primitive now"​. ​ Oh, these raw bloods! And then your great great grandchild. What are we thinking of now, and to what dim and distant date are we projecting our minds? To none other than the lst. of April, 2035, and the occasion of the Official Opening, assisted by the latest and most up-to-date squadron of aeroplanes, of the Great Western National Park and Primitive Phantasmagorical Area. The aeroplanes will be used to locate the original pioneering body of surveyors who set out to put the Area onto paper away back in 1958 (( ? Correct or typo for 1985?)) Legend will have had it that they paraded along Narrow Neck one wintry day, and after due ceremony set out with a fierce desire to be really primitive. Their old marching anthem has been lost sight of, but it ended up somehow like this - "We all can be primitive, primitively primitive, (Whoopee). We all can be primitive now"​. ​ Oh, these raw bloods!
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 But I quite forgot about your great grandchild, and her survival is a little uncertain. It seems to be a toss up between her and the mosquitos at the Battle of Maitland Bay. If she wins, and she may do, for all things are possible, she will probably be found waving a bisouit in one hand and a piece of cheese in the other, and singing - But I quite forgot about your great grandchild, and her survival is a little uncertain. It seems to be a toss up between her and the mosquitos at the Battle of Maitland Bay. If she wins, and she may do, for all things are possible, she will probably be found waving a bisouit in one hand and a piece of cheese in the other, and singing -
  
-'​Though the '​mossies are a'​riling ​(( ? Typo for a'​miling?​ )),\\ +'​Though the '​mossies are a'​riling,​\\ ​
 I'll keep the pot a'​Byleing,​\\ ​ I'll keep the pot a'​Byleing,​\\ ​
 For see what my great grand aunt's done for me.\\  For see what my great grand aunt's done for me.\\ 
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 On Friday 5th July, the Sydney Bushwalkers held a Social Evening in aid of the funds of the forthcoming Annual Bushwalkers'​ Ball. This was attended by a large number and the guests enjoyed a programme of dancing, musical items, games and a 1-Act Play, the whole evening being voted a great success. On Friday 5th July, the Sydney Bushwalkers held a Social Evening in aid of the funds of the forthcoming Annual Bushwalkers'​ Ball. This was attended by a large number and the guests enjoyed a programme of dancing, musical items, games and a 1-Act Play, the whole evening being voted a great success.
  
-On the 12th. July about 26 Members of the Club visited the Shanghai Cafe for supper. Great amusement was caused by the attempts of most to use the chop-sticks provided by the management, but as no other implements were supplied the Members had to do the best they could. On 19th. July the first production by the Dramatic Society was put before the Club Members. This took the form of 3 1-Act Plays which were very creditably ​rerformed ​and thoroughly enjoyed by a very large attendance.+On the 12th. July about 26 Members of the Club visited the Shanghai Cafe for supper. Great amusement was caused by the attempts of most to use the chop-sticks provided by the management, but as no other implements were supplied the Members had to do the best they could. On 19th. July the first production by the Dramatic Society was put before the Club Members. This took the form of 3 1-Act Plays which were very creditably ​performed ​and thoroughly enjoyed by a very large attendance.
  
 On the 26th. July, Mr. W.J. Cleary gave an intensely interesting talk to the Members on four of his recent camping trips. Mr. Cleary'​s style is particularly humourous and very attractive and as a result the talk was voted among the best. On the 26th. July, Mr. W.J. Cleary gave an intensely interesting talk to the Members on four of his recent camping trips. Mr. Cleary'​s style is particularly humourous and very attractive and as a result the talk was voted among the best.
  
-The Bushwalkerst ​Ball, held on 30th. July was a great success.+The Bushwalkers' ​Ball, held on 30th. July was a great success.
  
 We extend our heartiest congratulations to Irene Smith and Bill Reilly on their engagement. May every happiness be theirs and every wish of their hearts. We extend our heartiest congratulations to Irene Smith and Bill Reilly on their engagement. May every happiness be theirs and every wish of their hearts.
193508.txt · Last modified: 2015/11/09 05:05 by sbw