User Tools

Site Tools


193312

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
193312 [2016/12/05 22:15]
vivien [Delilah Meanders]
193312 [2016/12/05 22:41]
vivien [The Log of the Joy.]
Line 190: Line 190:
  
  
-====== The Log of the "​Joy"​. ======+===== The Log of the "​Joy"​ =====
  
 H. Chardon. H. Chardon.
Line 295: Line 295:
  
  
-=====  
-The Jounima Peaks - Yarrangobilly ===== 
  
 +===== The Jounima Peaks - Yarrangobilly =====
 +
 +As we stood an the summit of Mount Bimberi in the Federal Capital Territory, we saw the pointed tops of the Jounima Range rising clear and challengingly across the blue intervening hills and valleys. A few weeks later we had answered their challenge, and were hastening by car from Yass up the lovely vale of Tumut, up the renowned Talbingo mountains to the turn off to the Jounima State Forest, just before Yarrangobilly. The car was parked at the cottage of the officer in charge of the plantation, and we set off through the young pine trees and thence by the blazed track through the bush to the Jounima (branch) creek, where we camped amid the desolation of burnt trees and dead sticks.
 +
 +The forester had predicted rain in a little over twenty-four hours, but there was nothing to show the truth of his prophecy as we scrambled up the hillsides next way through burnt bush with blue sky showing between the brown branches overhead. Eventually we emerged on the first bare rocky top, but it was the lower end, and so we walked to the highest part. We searched in vain for the cairn and then discovered on looking across the next valley that Jounima proper, a bunch of heaped, black rocks, lay still a long way off. Down the slopes we went, across the col and up the rocks, and surely now we were on top. The snow-gum excluded the view, and we climbed each highest group of rocks, still to find there was no cairn. On the final group we caught a glimpse outwards, and there was the elusive Jounima still across yet another valley. Down we plunged through the criss-cross of dead and living snow-gum, mixed up with undergrowth and huge boulders. We were glad to get out onto the heaped up boulders which formed the final route to the top. They provided quite good rock- scrambling, but we were not sorry when we eventually heaved our rucksacks out in front of the cairn. From here, the Jounima Range spread out northward, while away to the east was our old friend, Mount Bimberi, a rounded summit wholly lacking in distinction,​ and away on the south western horizon lay the crystal snows of Jagungal and the Kosciusko (Kosciuszko) Plateau.
 +
 +We left our camping gear at the bottom of the next deep col, and then climbed the steep rocks of Big Plain Bogong. I succeeded in getting one or two quite hair-raising photos of my friend clinging by her eyelids from the face of impossible precipices, just like they do in the pictures of mountaineering journals. Below us lay the marsh and grass of Bull's flats, a delightful upland glade whose choice indicated admirable taste on the part of the bulls who presumably gave it its name, while it in turn apparently gave its name to Bogong above the Big Plain.
 +From Bull's Flats we climbed the Pillared Rocks, not a peaky summit like the other two, but providing the very best rock scrambling we had done in Australia.
 +
 +We had used the limit of our daylight and there was a rush to get back to camp before dark. The wind had risen in the afternoon and we tied an extra stay to the back of the tent, but there was still nothing to show the fulfilment of the forester'​s prophecy. We woke about 4 a.m., to a howling tempest which threatened to carry the tent away. The rain dribbled in freely where out backs touched its sides, and, while the back stay held, the back tent poles had fallen down, so that our feet protruded together with eiderdown sleeping bags. When we put our heads out we found we were in a wilderness of driving mist. There was nothing for it but to pack up and set back by compass, and it takes a lot of faith in science to follow the compass blindly when all your commonsense urges you another way. Once we stopped on the top of some slimy, slippery moss-covered boulders wondering if we dare venture from the direct route to find an easier one for our rubber-soled shoes, when a dreadful thing happened. The mist-curtain parted for a few moments in the valley beneath, and we saw a series of unknown ridges and gullies which were certainly not there when we came, and yet the compass needle pointed inexorably across them. Were we about to plunge down into the pathless gullies between Jounima and Canberra? Ought we to go to the right or the left of the way the compass pointed us? An awful feeling of utter loneliness came over us, alone with the drifting mist, the fury of the storm and the desolate, trackless heights. Then for the fraction of a second the mist parted on the further hill, and we saw the familiar flat-topped rocks across the unknown ridges and valleys, and right in the direction of the compass! Our teeth were chattering in the wet and icy wind, our feet frozen in the snow-drifts,​ but the feeling of desolation had gone, and a warm faith in the compass lighted the way over the phantasmal, non-existent ridges that the mist had conjured up. It is unnecessary to give the details of that wet and windy tramp home, or the hail that came dawn like small bullets when we crossed the flat-topped rocks. We reached the forest plantation in less time than it had taken to come out, feeling that the compass was the most wonderful thing an had ever invented - next to fire!
 +
 +Our bedraggled appearance caused peals of laughter on the part of Mrs.-the-forester,​ but her husband, who had long since resigned himself to heading a search party on the morrow, was too relieved to do more than smile. Needless to say, they were hospitality itself, and two hours later, with their chains on the tyres of our car, we were warm and dry, and on our way home.
  
-As we stood an the summit of Mount Bimberi in the Federal Capital Territory, we saw the pointed tops of the Jounima Range rising clear and challengingly across the blue intervening hills and valleys L. few weeks later we had answered their challenge, and were hastening by car from Yass up the lovely vale of Tumut, up the renowned Talbingo mountains to the turn off to the Jounima State Forest, just before 
-Yarrangobilly. The car was parked at the cottage of the officer in charge of the 
-plantation, and we set off through the young pine trees and thence by the blazed track through the bush to the Jour-Jima (branch) creek, where we camped amid the desolation of burnt trees and dead sticks. 
-The forester had predicted rain in a little over twenty-four hours, but there 
-was nothing to show the truth of his prophecy as we scrambled up the hillsides next way throuthe burnt bush with blue sky showing between the brown branches overhead. 
-?in 
-6ventually we emerged an the first bare rocky top, but it VAS the lower end, and so 
-we walked to the highest part. We searched in vain for the cairn and then discovered on looking acfosa, the next valley that Jounima proper, a bunch of heaped, black rocks, 
-lay still a long way off. Down the slopes we went, across the col and up the rocks, and surely now we were on top. The snow-gum excluded the view, and we climbed each highest group of rocks, still to find there was no cairn. On the final group we caught a glimpse outwards, and there was the elusive Jounima still across yet another valley. Down we plunged through the criss-cross of dead and living snow-gum, mixed up with undergrowth and hugh boulders. We were glad to get out onto the heaped up boulders which formed the final route to the top. They provided quite good rock- scrambling, but we were not sorry when we eventually heaved our rucksacks out in 
-front of the cairn. From here, the Jounima Range spread out northward, while away to the oast was our old friend, Mount Bimberi, a rounded summit wholly lacking in distinction,​ and away on the south western horizon lay the crystal snows of Jagungal and the Kosciusko Plateau. 
-We left our camping gear at the bottom of the next deep col, and then climbed the steep rocks of Big Plain Bogong. I succeeded in getting one or two quite hair- raising photos of my friend clinging by her eyelids from the face of impossible 
-precipices, just like they do in the pictures of mountaineering journals. Below us 
-lay the marsh and grass of Bull's flats, a delightful upland glade whose choice indicated admirable taste on the pa-t of the bulls who presumably gave it its name, while it in turn apparently gave its name to Bogang above the Big Plain. 
-From Bull's Flats we climbed the Pillared Rocks, not a peaky summit like the other two, but providing the very best rock scrambling we had done in 4ustralia. 
-We had used the limit of our daylight and there was a rush to get back to camp before dark. The wind had risen in the afternoon and we tied an extra stay to the back of the tent, but there was still nothing to show the fulfilment of the forester'​s prophecy. We woke about 4 a.m., to a howling tempest which threatened to carry the tent away. The rain dribbled in freely where out backs touched its sides, and, while the back stay held, the back tent poles had fallen down, so that our feet protruded together with eiderdown sleeping bags. When we put our heads out we found we were in a wilderness of driving mist. There WAS nothing for it but to pack up 
-and set back by compass-, and it takes a lot of faith in science to follow the compass blindly when all your commonsense urges you another way. Once we stopped on the top of some slimy, slippery moss-covered boulders wondering if we dare venture from the direct route to find an easier one for our rubber-soled shoes, when a dreadful thing happened. The mist-curtain parted for a few moments in the valley beneath, and we saw a series of unknown ridges and gullies which were certainly not there when we came, and yet the compass needle pointed inexorably across them. Were we about 
--21- 
-to plunge dawn into the pathless gullies between Jounima and Canberra? Ought we to 
-go to the right or the left of the way the compass pointed us? An awful feeling of utter loneliness came over us, alone with the drifting mist, the fury of the 
-storm and the desolate, trackless heights. Then for the fraction of a second the 
-mist parted on the further hill, and we saw the familiar flat-topped rocks across the unknown ridges and valleys, and right in the direction of the compass! Our teeth were chattering in the wet and icy wind, our feet frozen in the snow-drifts,​ but the feeling of desolation had gone, and a warm faith in the compass lighted the 
-way over the phantasmal, non-existent ridges that the mist had conjured up. It is unnecessary to give the details of that wet and windy tramp home, or the hail that 
-came dawn like small bullets when we crossed the flat-topped rocks. We reached 
-the forest plantation in less time than it had taken to come out, feeling that the compass was the most wonderful thing an had ever invented - next to firel 
-Our bedraggled appearance caused peals of laughter on the part of Mrs.-theforester,​ but her husband, who had long since resigned himself to heading a search party on the morrow, was too relieved to do more than smile. Needless to say, they 
-were hospitality itself, and two hours later, with their chains on the tyres of our car, we were warm and dry, and on our way home. 
 Marie B. Byles. Marie B. Byles.
-SOCIAL NOTES. + 
-The previous two months have been, from a social point of view, the most + 
-important in the Club's year, awing to the 6th. Annual Concert, and this year we +===== Social Notes ===== 
-repeated same in aid of the Garawarra Primitive Area Scheme. + 
-Mr. Colefax came along from the Australian Museum and gave a most interesting +The previous two months have been, from a social point of view, the most important in the Club's year, awing to the 6th. Annual Concert, and this year we repeated same in aid of the Garawarra Primitive Area Scheme. 
-and illuminating address to the Members on the Marine Life around Sydney. This + 
-was Mr. Colefaxls ​first visit to our Club Rooms, but we hope it will not be his last. +Mr. Colefax came along from the Australian Museum and gave a most interesting and illuminating address to the Members on the Marine Life around Sydney. This was Mr. Colefax'​s ​first visit to our Club Rooms, but we hope it will not be his last. 
-Perhaps one of the most enjoyable evenings we have spent was that on which Bob Savage showed us his photos taken during his Canoe trip down the Kawmung ​River. This river is probably the most popular with Bush Walkers, and they are never tired of locking ​at pictures of it and talking about it, to say nothing of making trips there as frequently as they can manage. + 
-Our 6th. Annual Concert was from every point of view a great success-. The +Perhaps one of the most enjoyable evenings we have spent was that on which Bob Savage showed us his photos taken during his Canoe trip down the Kowmung ​River. This river is probably the most popular with Bush Walkers, and they are never tired of looking ​at pictures of it and talking about it, to say nothing of making trips there as frequently as they can manage. 
-consensus of opinion is that from a point of view of entertainment,​ the 6th. Annual was by far the best the Bush Walkers have produced to date. The Members of the Boys' Ballet were voted quite the dearest little things, and added further to the Laurels gained last year. The attendance was the largest we have had so far, and + 
-bhe profits are expected to be considerable. On the lath. November the concert +Our 6th. Annual Concert was from every point of view a great success. The consensus of opinion is that from a point of view of entertainment,​ the 6th. Annual was by far the best the Bush Walkers have produced to date. The Members of the Boys' Ballet were voted quite the dearest little things, and added further to the Laurels gained last year. The attendance was the largest we have had so far, and the profits are expected to be considerable. On the 16th. November the concert was repeated in aid of the Garawarra, as mentioned above, and the concert party had he pleasure of playing to another appreciative audience. There will probably be a profit of £7 odd to give to this fund. 
-was repeated in aid of the Garawarra, as mentioned above, and the concert party had he pleasure of playing to another appreciative audience. There will probably be a profit of odd to give to this fund. + 
-The 17th. was spent by Members "​Twirling the Light Fantastic,"​ the evening being a Social and Gift Book Night in aid of our Library. What with Community Singing and the usual small talk at which the Bush Walkers are not backward, they spent a very +The 17th. was spent by Members "​Twirling the Light Fantastic,"​ the evening being a Social and Gift Book Night in aid of our Library. What with Community Singing and the usual small talk at which the Bush Walkers are not backward, they spent a very pleasant evening. Mr. F. Rice's Snapshots entitled "​Familiar Scenes"​ were extremely
-pleasant evening. Mr. F. Rice's Snapshots entitled "​Familiar Scenes"​ were extremely+
 beautiful, and rather gained than lost by being true to title and in every way indeed familiar. The River Scenes were lovely, and some of the '​photos of the Outback Homesteads were delightfully rural. beautiful, and rather gained than lost by being true to title and in every way indeed familiar. The River Scenes were lovely, and some of the '​photos of the Outback Homesteads were delightfully rural.
--22 - + 
-The Club extends its hearty congratulations to Mr. & Mrs. Roots on the latest ​elddition ​to their family, Miss Daphne Vivian; we hope she will prove as good a Aush4Talker ​as Gweneth and Walter junior. +The Club extends its hearty congratulations to Mr. & Mrs. Roots on the latest ​edition ​to their family, Miss Daphne Vivian; we hope she will prove as good a Bush Walker ​as Gweneth and Walter junior. 
-The latest epidemic, as reported by our First Aid Expert, is marriage. Those + 
-suffering from the complaint are:+The latest epidemic, as reported by our First Aid Expert, is marriage. Those suffering from the complaint are: Jess & Tom (Mr. & Mrs. Williams); Oscar & Esme (Mr. & Mrs. Armstrong); Dorman & Jean (Mr. & Mrs. Hardie). We wish these three couples the very best that life has to give, and may they live long to enjoy their wedded happiness. 
-Jess & Tom (Mr. & Mrs. Williams); Oscar & Esme (Mr. & Mrs. Armstrong); Dorman & Jean (Mr. & Mrs. Hardie). + 
-We wish these three couples the very best that life has to give, and may they live long to enjoy their wedded happiness. +The Social Secretary draws Members' ​attention to the forthcoming Annual Xmas Treat for Poor Children to take place on the 17th. December. Subscriptions are urgently needed - 3/- pays one Child'​s ​train fare and also feeds it for the day; also help with the children on the day is necessary, and if some of the men would come along and help it would be greatly appreciated. 
-The Social Secretary draws Membersattention to the forthcoming Annual Xmas Treat for Poor Children to take place on the 17th. December. Subscriptions are urgently needed - 3/- pays one Childts ​train fare and also feeds it for the day; also help with the children on the day is necessary, and if some of the men would come along and help it would be greatly appreciated. + 
-The Federation of Bushwalking Clubs arranged an outing on Sunday 26th. Nov. + 
-to the Garawarra ​Fiimitive ​Area. There were quite a number of people invited to be +The Federation of Bushwalking Clubs arranged an outing on Sunday 26th. Nov. to the Garawarra ​Primitive ​Area. There were quite a number of people invited to be the guests of the Federation. The cars left the G.P.O. Sydney at 2 p.m., and took the party to the Governor Game Lookout, where they walked along the track - a distance of about 2.5 miles - to Bulgo. Here they were given afternoon tea by your Social Secretary, ably assisted by a band of helpers including the 1st. Concord Boy Scouts. There were some short and interesting speeches delivered, and Mr.Atkinson,​ the Secretary of the Federation, read a letter in which he was informed of the grant of 1300 acres to us as a reserve. Cheers
-the guests of the Federation. The cars left the G.P.O. Sydney at 2 p.m., and took + 
-the party to the Governor Game Lookout, where they walked along the track - a +After the speeches, the party, numbering about 50, walked-to Lilyvale where they were given tea, and they generally seemed to enjoy the alfresco ​meals and atmosphere of good comradeship which abounded. 
-distance of about 2i- miles - to Bulgo. Here they were given afternoon tea by your +
-Social Secretary, ably assisted by a band of helpers including the 1st. Concord Boy +
-Scouts. There were some short and interesting speeches delivered, and Mr.Atkinson,​ the Secretary of the Federation, read a letter in which he was informed of the grant of 1300 acres to us as a reserve. Cheers: +
-later the speeches, the party, numbering about 50, walked-to Lilyvale where they were given tea, and they generally seemed to enjoy the al-fresco ​meals and atmosphere of good comradeship which abounded.+
 This outing was also on the Official Programme for Health Week, and from that point of view was an innovation for Walking Clubs. This outing was also on the Official Programme for Health Week, and from that point of view was an innovation for Walking Clubs.
 +
 The Social Secretary extends her very best wishes to all for the happiest of Christmas Seasons and hopes we will all have good weather and good camping. The Social Secretary extends her very best wishes to all for the happiest of Christmas Seasons and hopes we will all have good weather and good camping.
-FOR THE SOCIAL, COMMITTEE,+ 
 + 
 +For the Social Secretary,
 Rene D. Browne, Rene D. Browne,
 Hon. Social Secretary. Hon. Social Secretary.
  
193312.txt · Last modified: 2016/12/05 22:41 by vivien