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193310 [2014/05/22 10:37]
smiffy [Filming Mount Wellington]
193310 [2014/05/22 11:08] (current)
smiffy [Filming Mount Wellington]
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 We left the track, and reached the snowy slopes below the pinnacle about 1 o'​clock. There the snow was literally sprinkled with moving figures, and sprinkled generously - their bright jumpers, scarves, and berets, of every imaginable colour, looked very effective. Some were an skis, looking as much at home on them as we did on our feet. Others were picking themselves up from the ground, looking quite surprised at their sudden downfall. We left the track, and reached the snowy slopes below the pinnacle about 1 o'​clock. There the snow was literally sprinkled with moving figures, and sprinkled generously - their bright jumpers, scarves, and berets, of every imaginable colour, looked very effective. Some were an skis, looking as much at home on them as we did on our feet. Others were picking themselves up from the ground, looking quite surprised at their sudden downfall.
  
-Other parties had toboggans, and how I envied them their sport! However, we found it decidedly pleasant to sit on the top of a slope and slide dawn on the seat of our breeches. They were long slopes, and steep, and we invariably rolled over and over at the bottom, just having enough presence of mind left to crawl out of the way, before other figures came hurtling down on top of us. The more these slides were used the more they resembled a switchback, with their hollows and bumps. The worst part, of course, was climbing up to the top again, and in the slippery snow that was no easy task. Oh it was great to watch the crowd... sliding, tobogganing,​ skiing over the slopes, and always as a background the panorama below, as though it had been painted scenery to set off the figures on the stage +Other parties had toboggans, and how I envied them their sport! However, we found it decidedly pleasant to sit on the top of a slope and slide dawn on the seat of our breeches. They were long slopes, and steep, and we invariably rolled over and over at the bottom, just having enough presence of mind left to crawl out of the way, before other figures came hurtling down on top of us. The more these slides were used the more they resembled a switchback, with their hollows and bumps. The worst part, of course, was climbing up to the top again, and in the slippery snow that was no easy task. Oh it was great to watch the crowd... sliding, tobogganing,​ skiing over the slopes, and always as a background the panorama below, as though it had been painted scenery to set off the figures on the stage
-A few of us left the slopes, and returned to the Track, and went an up to the Pinnacle. There we found the Movie man taking 'long shots'​. The view from + 
-that point(4166 ft.) is much the same as from the Springs, and even more +A few of us left the slopes, and returned to the track, and went an up to the pinnacle. There we found the movie man taking 'long shots'​. The view from that point (4166 ft) is much the same as from the Springs, and even more extensive. On a clear day it is possible to see as far north as Cradle ​Mountain. (I won't attempt any more descriptions of the viewYou will have to come and see it for yourselves.) 
-extensive. On a clear day it is possible to see as far north as Cradle ​Mtn. (I won't attempt any more descriptions of the viewYou will have to come and see it for yourselves.) + 
-At first, the return trip (or slip?) dawn the Track was more difficult than coming up. Dozens of people were still going and coming up the trackThe snow had been so worn it had became very slippery, the rail was much in use, +At first, the return trip (or slip?) dawn the track was more difficult than coming up. Dozens of people were still going and coming up the trackThe snow had been so worn it had became very slippery, the rail was much in use, and we would have had to join the queue and take our time behind the othersMost of our comrades were still skiing, so the two or three of us together, decided to take short cuts back to the SpringsWe tried one or two short distances first: we simply sat dawn on the side of the track, slid under the wire rail and down the slope till we reached the point where the track crossed again below. I remember we were advised not to do this as "there's no knowing where you'll stop", but having successfully tried the short cuts, we decided to risk the long cuts in the same way. The snow seemed to have an intoxicating effect on one! 
--4- + 
-and we would have had to join the Queue and take our time behind the othersMost of our comrades ​,i were still Skiing, so the two or three of us together, decided to take short cuts back to the SpringsWe tried one or two short distances first: we simply sat dawn on the side of the track, slid under the wire rail and down the slope till we reached the point where the track crossed again below. I remember we were advised not to do this as "There's no knowing where you'll stop", but having successfully tried the short cuts, we decided to risk the long cuts in the same way. The snow seemed to have an intoxicating effect on ones +As we tore down those slopes, still on the seat of our breeches, we realised ​how quickly we were travelling, and how difficult it was to pull up. We were only dimly conscious of all the people along the track. ​It would have been quite easy to "​shoot"​ across the track below, especially where the wire was buried, but we were confident that some of the pedestrians would grab us as we shot across their path! As for the tree trunks, bushes, rocks under the snow, we just didn't think of them. Our last slither ​was longer, but we took it in two stages. Keeping a bush in sight about half way down the slope, we again slithered under the wire, and left the track. For a moment I thought I was going to shoot past the bush, (it wasn't a very comfortable thought), but by sticking my heels in the snow, found it possible to reduce my speed enough to enable me to seize the bush and '​anchor'​ on it. I arrived on the track below a few seconds later, grabbing the rail to prevent an enforced continuation of the journey. People coming up the track looked at me in surprise, with a "Where on earth did you come from?" expression on their faces. My abrupt descent upon their track, preventing their progresswas, to say the least of it, sudden. Also, it was a hard welcome. The snow had begun to melt, and for tie first time I hadn't arrived on a softly padded ​cushion! ​I had just picked myself ​up, when someone above announced her departure on the second stage, and probable arrival in a few seconds. She had requested me to stop her downward flight, but while I was making my way to the place she should arrive, another dropped from above without any warning, as I had done, and knocked ​me spinning down the track some yardsAll this of course held up the "​traffic"​ somewhat, and the third' person'​s sudden descent in our midst only increased the general upset. 
-As we tore dawn those slopes, still on the seat of our breeches, we realised ​haw quickly we were travelling, and haw difficult it was to pull up. We were only dimly conscious of all the people along the track. ​Ifwould ​have been quite easy to "​shoot"​ across the track below, especially where the wire was buried, but we were confident that some of the pedestrians would grab us as we shot across their paths As for the tree trunks, bushes, rocks under the snow, we just didn't think of them. Our last slitHer ​was longer, but we took it in two stages. Keeping a bush in sight about half way down the slope, we again slithered under the wire, Mali left the track. For a moment I thought I was going to shoot past the bush, (it wasn't a very comfortable thought), but by sticking my heels in the snow, found it possible to reduce my speed enough to enable me to seize the bush and '​anchor'​ on it. I arrived on the track below a few seconds later, grabbing the rail to prevent an enforced continuation of the journey. People coming up the Track looked at me in surprise, with a "There on earth did you come from?" expression on their faces. My abrupt descent upon their track, preventing their progresswas, to say the least of it, sudden. Also, it was a hard welcome. The snow had begun to melt, and for tie first time I hadn't arrived on a softly padded ​cushions ​I had just picked myself ​VD, when someone above announced her departure on the second stage, and probable arrival in a few seconds. She had requested me to stope her downward flight, but while I was making my way to the place she should arrive, another dropped from above without any warning, as I had done, and knocked ​MR spinning down the Track some yardsAll this of course held up the "​traffic"​ somewhat, and the third' person'​s sudden descent in our midst only increased the general upset.+
 We finally disentangled ourselves, and the "​procession"​ continued its upward climb. We were quite sorry there was no more snow. I might mention that these "​stunts"​ weren7t photographed,​ as the Camera man was probably still at the Pinnacle taking "long shots"​....,,​and that I had to begin saving up at once for a new pair of breeches. We finally disentangled ourselves, and the "​procession"​ continued its upward climb. We were quite sorry there was no more snow. I might mention that these "​stunts"​ weren7t photographed,​ as the Camera man was probably still at the Pinnacle taking "long shots"​....,,​and that I had to begin saving up at once for a new pair of breeches.
 Needless to say we arrived at the Springs long before the rest of our party, but in good order and condition. Our popular President met us on the verandah, with his never ending chocolate supply. The walk back to Hobart was uneventful. We arrived in toda at 5,30, and we all agreed we'd had our photos taken more in that one day than in our lives before...but it was one of the best day trips we had done...and certainly the cheapestt Needless to say we arrived at the Springs long before the rest of our party, but in good order and condition. Our popular President met us on the verandah, with his never ending chocolate supply. The walk back to Hobart was uneventful. We arrived in toda at 5,30, and we all agreed we'd had our photos taken more in that one day than in our lives before...but it was one of the best day trips we had done...and certainly the cheapestt
 Mary Harrisson, Bellerive,​ Tasmania. Mary Harrisson, Bellerive,​ Tasmania.
--5+ 
-THE CHRONICLES OF AY-N00-MEM.+===== The Chronicles of Ay-Noo-Mem ===== 
 Now it came to pass in the fifth year of the Great Depresh, that a certain man did approach the tents of the Ess Bee Two-Yoos and did say unto them: "Lo l I would fain join your tribe in their wanderings through the wilderness."​ And they did straightway bring him before the Sec and said: "​Beholds This man desireth to join cur tribe."​ Now it came to pass in the fifth year of the Great Depresh, that a certain man did approach the tents of the Ess Bee Two-Yoos and did say unto them: "Lo l I would fain join your tribe in their wanderings through the wilderness."​ And they did straightway bring him before the Sec and said: "​Beholds This man desireth to join cur tribe."​
 And the Sec did look upon him with compassion and did say unto him: "Poor Mut, (which being interpreted is - Thou Fool) turn thou back now, are it be too late, for what thou seekest is hard to do, yes, that which thy heart desires can only be accomplished by the sweat of thy brow." And the Sec did look upon him with compassion and did say unto him: "Poor Mut, (which being interpreted is - Thou Fool) turn thou back now, are it be too late, for what thou seekest is hard to do, yes, that which thy heart desires can only be accomplished by the sweat of thy brow."
193310.txt · Last modified: 2014/05/22 11:08 by smiffy