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193206 [2018/04/04 21:08]
127.0.0.1 external edit
193206 [2018/04/05 01:53] (current)
tyreless
Line 97: Line 97:
 Arrived at Katoomba at long last, and it was raining very heavily, we walked out of the subway, ignored the snickers of the by-standers,​ turned to the right and after two false starts proceeded along the Great Western Road past the Shell Depot until we came to the Explorers'​ Tree. Here we turned off sharp to the left along a partly made vehicular track and after much travail negotiated the slippery sloppiness of Nelly'​s Glen. This is a delightful prank of nature, almost passable in broad daylight. Arrived at Katoomba at long last, and it was raining very heavily, we walked out of the subway, ignored the snickers of the by-standers,​ turned to the right and after two false starts proceeded along the Great Western Road past the Shell Depot until we came to the Explorers'​ Tree. Here we turned off sharp to the left along a partly made vehicular track and after much travail negotiated the slippery sloppiness of Nelly'​s Glen. This is a delightful prank of nature, almost passable in broad daylight.
  
->From Nelly'​s Glen the walk along Megalong Valley is delightful in comparison. A dry sandy track, a creek on the right most of the way and undulating treed country making the walking almost enjoyable. Arrived at the Church on the top of the hill, we spurned that section of the country over which we had passed before, and cunningly sneaked away to the left along a steadily rising track, our intention being to get into the Cox Valley down the gulley of Breakfast Creek. By this time night had fallen, and probably hurt itself in the process, because it was very black and gloomy, and after some four miles we noticed a twinkling light in the Settler'​s Hut and discovered on enquiry that it was one Duncan, a man who knew all about the country but nothing about the track we should have taken to go to Breakfast Creek. After one hour's wasted consultation with him, we took what we thought were his directions and walked in a wide circle, eventually bringing up at the point where the track leads down Black Jerry to the Cox River. This was a frightful disappointment and we almost decided to turn back, but as the obstacles we had surmounted loomed as great as those which we thought we were going to encounter we decided to push on. By this time, of course, the walk had been robbed of all its enjoyment and we were cold, hungry and wet.+From Nelly'​s Glen the walk along Megalong Valley is delightful in comparison. A dry sandy track, a creek on the right most of the way and undulating treed country making the walking almost enjoyable. Arrived at the Church on the top of the hill, we spurned that section of the country over which we had passed before, and cunningly sneaked away to the left along a steadily rising track, our intention being to get into the Cox Valley down the gulley of Breakfast Creek. By this time night had fallen, and probably hurt itself in the process, because it was very black and gloomy, and after some four miles we noticed a twinkling light in the Settler'​s Hut and discovered on enquiry that it was one Duncan, a man who knew all about the country but nothing about the track we should have taken to go to Breakfast Creek. After one hour's wasted consultation with him, we took what we thought were his directions and walked in a wide circle, eventually bringing up at the point where the track leads down Black Jerry to the Cox River. This was a frightful disappointment and we almost decided to turn back, but as the obstacles we had surmounted loomed as great as those which we thought we were going to encounter we decided to push on. By this time, of course, the walk had been robbed of all its enjoyment and we were cold, hungry and wet.
  
 The mountain at this point drops down in a grade of about two in one, and care must be taken by the walker to ensure that he does not bump the back of his head on his heels as he negotiates the descent. At long last, represented chronologically by 11.30 p.m. we made camp by the Cox. The mountain at this point drops down in a grade of about two in one, and care must be taken by the walker to ensure that he does not bump the back of his head on his heels as he negotiates the descent. At long last, represented chronologically by 11.30 p.m. we made camp by the Cox.
193206.txt ยท Last modified: 2018/04/05 01:53 by tyreless